Top Adventure College Tournament – Final Round

first_imgWhat’s the best outdoor school in the Southeast and mid-Atlantic? We’re asking you to decide! The Blue Ridge Outdoors Top Adventure College Tournament puts colleges and universities in head-to-head matchups. The 32 schools were selected for their outdoor clubs and curricula, commitment to the outdoors and environmental initiatives, the quality of their outdoor athletes and programs, and their opportunities for adventure. Each week winners advance to the next round.Will your alma mater take the tournament crown?Vote Now: https://www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/best-adventure-school/last_img

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Museums Train Docents to Deal with Evolution Skeptics

first_imgBeing a museum docent wasn’t supposed to be this hard.  Many have always led peaceful groups of compliant tourists through the halls of science, telling their near-memorized lines without incident: Sixty million years ago, the dinosaurs were wiped out by a meteor, but their descendants are still with us today.  Anyone know who those might be?  Yes Johnny?  Birds!  That’s correct. Very good!  Now, according to the New York Times, growing numbers of museum visitors are challenging the evolutionary explanations and asking questions that indicate they’re not buying the story.  This has led to a new “cottage industry,” according to Eugenie Scott of the NCSE, of training guides for guides, teaching them how to deal with such situations.    The training emphasizes non-confrontational yet firm emphasis on the difference between science and faith: to be “polite but firm.”  Docents are warned against challenging visitors’ religious beliefs directly.  Instead, they are told to say things like, “The landscape tells a story based on geological events, based on science,” or “this is a science museum, and we deal with matters of science.”  They are warned against antagonizing Bible-believing Christians who argue that the world is only a few thousand years old; after all, they paid the admission fee and have just as much right to visit the museum as anyone else.  Dr. Scott in her sessions teaches docents not to avoid the word “evolution” or be defensive, but simultaneously not to slam the door in the face of believers.  “Your job is to help them, to explain your point of view, but respect theirs.”  The manuals encourage them to practice with memorized responses.    Tom Magnuson at Access Research Network found one such docent guide online on the front page of the Paleontological Research Institution, entitled “Evolution and Creationism: A Guide for Museum Docents.”  It explains how to respond to a complaints about natural selection or other evolutionary mechanisms:The question of whether evolution occurs is separate and different from the question of how evolution occurs.  The evidence is overwhelming that evolution has occurred – that it is a satisfactory explanation for the observations we make about the history, order, and diversity of life….    Questions or debates about evolutionary mechanism have nothing to do with our confidence in whether evolution occurred.   (Italics in original, bold added.)Later in the document, one of the answers seems more firm than polite.  The question is, Is it true there is lots of evidence against evolution? No.  Essentially all available data and observations from the natural world support the hypothesis of evolution.  No serious biologist or geologist today doubts whether evolution occurred; debate continues, however, among scientists about the mechanisms by which evolution occurred.The response to the question on intelligent design is also instructive.  Doesn’t the complexity/design of nature imply an intelligent designer?Science deals only with material causes of material phenomena.  Nothing we can observe in nature requires a supernatural designer; we therefore defer to material processes to explain what we see in nature.The document denounces the idea that evolution is a religion.  At the bottom, it refers to the National Center for Science Education, indicating that the NCSE probably provided content or advice for the publication.    The guide warns against arguing with convinced creationists, saying “you can’t win.”  The docent can try to deflect the question, agree to disagree, claim ignorance, or state that the museum is not the place to discuss “philosophy, religion or politics” but only “science” or “state-of-the-art scientific knowledge.”  If all else fails, the docent can say, “Please excuse me.  I have to go to the restroom.”    The Times says that the American Museum of Natural History is about to open “the most in-depth exhibition ever” of Darwin and his work.  Already, curators and staff are gearing up to deal with visitors who will challenge the presentations.This is a golden opportunity for informed visitors.  The Darwin Party has published all their Talking Points, and all that is needed is to formulate good follow-up questions aimed at them.  The Talking Points are so vapid and uninformed, this should be easy.  For instance, look at the way they treat this question: How do you know evolution happened a long time ago?By examining fossils and comparing them to organisms alive today.  In the Museum exhibits, for example, a short film about Cornell professor Amy McCune shows how she uses fossil fish to study how evolution happened in what is now the Connecticut River Valley around 200 million years ago.  She collects fossils from different layers and compares them to fish alive today and tries to conclude how evolution may have produced the patterns of similarity and difference she observes.This is a non-answer.  One has to assume evolution and long ages to believe it.  At most, it only demonstrates microevolution, which is not the issue.  The same fossils, layers and comparisons with live fish could be used by a knowledgeable creationist to argue against evolution and long ages and, instead, for a worldwide flood that sent many species into extinction.  The Darwinist answer confirms that evolutionary “science” is merely a storytelling enterprise by ideologues intent on force-fitting fragmentary observations into a preconceived belief system.  The blindness of evolutionists to their own circular reasoning is astounding.  The question was, How do you know evolution happened a long time ago?  The answer was, “Because evolution happened a long time ago.  See these 200-million-year-old fish?”  Surely the Darwinists could do better if better answers were available.    The talking points provide nothing new (see 09/02/2005 commentary).  Most of them revolve around “science” vs “faith.”  The published guide perpetuates the myth that evolution is a fact of science (even if the mechanism is hotly debated), and anything that doubts naturalistic explanations is ipso facto “religious.”  This is a setup for any logical thinker, because it is another circular argument.  Ask, how can a theory without a mechanism be considered scientific?  How can one call evolution, a hypothesis (their own word) with no agreed-on mechanism, a fact without first assuming it is a fact?  How can one declare what is scientific and what is not with mere definitions?  If I discuss only scientific evidence in rebuttal, how can you assume I have a religious motivation without reading my mind?  How can I know you don’t have an equally philosophical motivation to deny design?  Surely you are not insinuating that a Christian is incapable of reasoning from evidence or caring about the truth, or that materialists are more unbiased, are you?  What if the true answer lies outside natural causes – what if it really was designed?  Wouldn’t that prevent naturalism from ever finding the right answer?  Eventually, the discussion must return to the observable evidence.  That is not where the Darwinians want the discussion to go.  When forced, the museum curator may point to all the exhibits of intelligently-designed organisms on the wall, and say, “See?  There is the evidence, right there.  Look at those peppered moths, for instance.”  Now we can get somewhere.    In the film The Triumph of Design, Phillip Johnson looks forward to the day when students will respond to the evidence for peppered moths, finch beaks and the other usual Darwinist propaganda fare, with informed follow-up questions like, “Yes, we know about that.  We know the peppered moth story was a fraud, and that it did not really prove anything about macroevolution.  We know about Darwin’s finches, and that the changes to beak size showed no long-term trend; that does not demonstrate macroevolution, either.  Where is the evidence that macroevolution occurred?”  One can sympathize with a teacher’s sudden urge to go to the restroom.    All this being said, the last thing any reasonable person wants is for a poor, well-meaning docent to end up sobbing in the restroom over an “extremely argumentative or confrontational” visitor.  Want to destroy any chance for progress against Darwinism?  Just be a mean-spirited, dogmatic, unkind, loudmouth disputer trying to make the docent or curator look foolish in front of other people.  For a Christian, who believes in loving one’s neighbor and sharing good news, nothing is uglier, and nothing will backfire faster.  The goal is to encourage discussion, to build bridges to other people – to appeal to their sense of logic and integrity.  Long-shut doors need to be opened so the fresh air and sunshine can come in.  Let the Darwinists be the ones culpable of shutting off discussion.  Let them be the dogmatists.  Let their tactics backfire against the evident congeniality and reasonableness of their opposition.  The firm but gentle pressure of an increasing number of thoughtful, informed visitors will have its healing effect over time.  Many of these docents are volunteers or poorly paid workers just trying to do their job.  (This is true, sometimes for summer hires, or leaders of cave tours who, without any formal training in geology, simply parrot scripts that glibly describe formations as x million years old.)  If such workers are merely repeating what they were told to say, it’s not fair to pin the blame for all of Dogmatic Darwinism on them as individuals.  Yet unwarranted claims should not go unchallenged, either, whether from trained curators or untrained volunteers.  What to do?    One productive approach might be to speak with the docent alone, before the tour.  Let’s call the docent Linda.  Introduce yourself with a friendly greeting (it must be genuine, not forced), and let her know your point of view.  Reassure her that you are not there to argue; instead, say that both of us know that Darwinism is a controversial subject.  Let Linda know you respect scientific evidence.  Explain that many times evidence can be interpreted in more than one way, and that you just want the scientific evidence to be able to speak for itself as much as possible, and for problems or controversies to be acknowledged.  Ask Linda’s permission to present an alternative explanation for the fossil series, rock layers or whatever.  If she agrees, this takes the pressure off her to talk about it (and possibly misrepresent it) in front of the group.  If you are given the chance, be brief and accurate.  Don’t steal the show.  Hopefully you came prepared with knowledge specific to the display.  If she doesn’t want you to speak, at least she will know that an informed visitor is present, and that awareness may temper her dogmatism.    Whatever happens, express kindness, appreciation and diplomacy at all times.  Show respect.  Compliment the things that are good about the museum.  Most people are more influenced by the way you say something than what is actually said.  Be real and transparent.  Don’t speak beyond your knowledge, but don’t settle for pat answers, bluffing or evasion, either.  The normal civil manners – waiting one’s turn, not interrupting, not attacking another’s character or motives – these should all be second nature.  If you can communicate an informed, knowledgeable position in a winsome manner, you may find others in the group – maybe even Linda – crowding around you after the tour wanting to hear more, and thanking you for speaking up.  Another unobtrusive way to influence the museum is to write polite but firm statements on response cards about dogmatic exhibits.  Here’s another: infiltrate the ranks.  Sign up to be a museum docent and ask the hard questions to the trainer in the “dealing with creationists” class.  This could neutralize Dogmatic Darwinism before it affects hundreds of visitors.  If the museum retaliates by forbidding non-Darwinists from joining the museum volunteer docent staff and requiring a statement of faith, call the ACLU.  When they decline, well, you have a story for the local newspaper, and perhaps a case for the ADF.  Readers may wish to write in with their own suggestions and experiences.(Visited 31 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Tips for Shooting with the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera

first_imgBlackmagic Design is shipping the new Pocket Cinema Camera. Here are a few tips for getting started with the innovative cam!Blackmagic is tearing up the pro video camera market, with new cams at incredibly low prices.  In the following video tutorial, CheesyCam got their hands on a new Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera and shares a few things to watch out for.A few tips and takeaways from this Pocket Cinema Camera overview:Get fast SD cards.  Slow cards will result in dropped frames or simply not work.Solid state drives provide a good recording alternative over SD cards.Video output is via micro HDMI.Due to the small profile, you may need to step up the body (with cage or platform) for a lens to clear a mount or tripod.There are no audio meters in-camera.You cannot format cards in-camera.Battery can only be charged in-camera.  You will need to purchase an external charger if you want to charge batteries multiple batteries (or out of camera).Get more details on the CheesyCam site!Have you purchased a Pocket Cinema Camera?Share your advice/thoughts in the comments below!last_img read more

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Pacquiao easily makes weight, Horn ‘feeling better’

first_imgManny Pacquiao, center, weighs in, Tuesday, July 1, 2017, in Brisbane, Australia. Pacquiao, is putting his WBO welterweight world title on the line Sunday, July 2, against the 29-year-old Australian Jeff Horn. (AP Photo/John Pye)BRISBANE, Australia—Manny Pacquiao didn’t even bother to remove his socks and inhale when he stepped into the weigh scale on Saturday. He knew he’ll make it in a breeze.When it was Jeff Horn’s turn, however, the Australian challenger approached it with caution and took a deep breath before boarding, not daring to look at what it registered.ADVERTISEMENT Pagasa: Kammuri now a typhoon, may enter PAR by weekend Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Other than that, the weigh-in for the “Battle of Brisbane” proceeded smoothly as all 14 boxers, including Filipinos Jerwin Ancajas and Joven Dapidran, made the cutoff weights on their first attempts.READ: Weighing game: Horn still over 7 pounds overweight for battleFact is, Pacquiao had the luxury of having a little breakfast at his suite before proceeding to the venue.“Everything’s well, it’s a good weight,” said Roach as Pacquiao missed his desired weight by half a pound.In contrast, Horn came too close to being over, said Roach, who saw Horn immediately eat a banana and gulp down fruit juice after his weight was announced.ADVERTISEMENT READ: Jeff Horn starving, still overweightHorn had to starve himself, taking only sips of water Thursday and little salad Friday night to shed 7.8 pounds and make weight.“It’s never easy to cut that many kilos, but I’m feeling a lot better now, putting fluids back in,” said Horn in the podium interview.According to trainer Glenn Rushton, he was certain that Horn will be able to hurdle the scales.READ: Pacquiao’s title on the line vs Horn in ‘Battle of Brisbane’ “He has never failed to make weight. Never,” said Rushton, who bared that Horn will slowly rehydrate and will climb the ring Sunday between 71 to 72 kilos (156 to 158) pounds.Rushton said there was no secret reducing formula, it so happened that Horn perspires profusely. So after doing his gym routines on sweat suits and having a hot bath, Horn was ready to go early Saturday.While Horn was having a crash diet on fight week, Pacquiao was having an eating binge. Wolfing down three full meals everyday so as not to appear emaciated during his face-off with Horn.READ: Relaxed and restingAs it turned out, it was Horn who looked haggard and pale, though not exactly physically drained. What ‘missteps’? Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ LOOK: Jane De Leon meets fellow ‘Darna’ Marian Rivera LATEST STORIES Pacquiao, on the other hand, appeared vibrant and fresh as he threw away the short, T-shirt, jogging pants and jacket he was wearing at the podium.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games View comments Creamline survives Adamson in PVL Open Conference opener Pacquiao checked in under at 146 pounds, while Horn, after an anxious second as the pin swayed back and forth, posted 147, the welterweight limit.READ: Pacquiao, Horn make weight for fight FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsHorn’s supporters, who dominated the crowd of a few hundred crammed at a function room of Suncorp Stadium, shouted “Hornet! Hornet! Hornet!” which is the challenger’s moniker.Not to be outdone, Pacquiao’s entourage countered “Manny! Manny! Manny!” China furious as Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong Cayetano to unmask people behind ‘smear campaign’ vs him, SEA Games MOST READ Another vape smoker nabbed in Lucenalast_img read more

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Hughes introduces bill awarding veterans with university credit

first_img Categories: Hughes News 22Jan Hughes introduces bill awarding veterans with university credit State Rep. Holly Hughes, R-Montague, next week will introduce legislation to award university academic credits to veterans who have completed college-level training in their years of military service.“Michigan’s veterans have provided an irreplaceable service to our state and our country,” said Hughes, vice chair of the Committee on Military and Veterans Affairs. “As citizens whose rights are protected by these brave men and women, it is the least we can do to aid their transition back into civilian life.”House Bill 4060 gives veterans the opportunity to use their college-level training gained from military service to apply for academic credits at universities across the state.“Our veterans fought for our freedoms during their service,” she said. “We owe it to them to award these academic credits they so rightly deserve.”Currently, veterans are often required take all classes under a curriculum at colleges and universities, despite possible overlap from their military training. Some colleges and universities already offer credit for military service, but this information is not made readily available to veterans when they enroll.Similar legislation was passed last year giving veterans community college credits for their training, and was designated Public Act 483 of 2014.###Hear more from Rep. Hughes on this legislation:+Rep. Holly Hughes, R-Montague, on university credit for military servicelast_img read more

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Video advertising technology specialist YuMe has r

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Telecom Italia has launched a broadbanddelivered

first_imgTelecom Italia has launched a broadband-delivered subscription video-on-demand service under the Cubovision brand.The service officially launched yesterday and the Italian telco has inked content deals with providers including CBS Studios, which will make a range of programming available via a branded on-demand channel on the service.The programming deal with CBS, which was concluded on a non-exclusive basis, gives streaming service Cubovision a range of US TV series including NCIS, Dexter and 90210. Classic CBS-distributed series including Twin Peaks and Star Trek: Enterprise will also be available on the service.
“With its launch in Italy, Cubovision is focused on adding significant quality to the entertainment choices available to Italian consumers, while providing a valuable new channel, increased consumer reach, adding “value creation” to the entire offer of TV programming from Telecom Italia” said Paolo d’Andrea, head of Innovative VAS, Telecom Italia.last_img read more

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Ukrainian cable operator Volia has upgraded its ne

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Could we prevent Alzheimers disease by treating herpes

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Common medications to treat heartburn linked to increased risks for kidney failure

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