Belarus website editor slapped with heavy fine

first_img Help by sharing this information May 27, 2021 Find out more March 4, 2019 Belarus website editor slapped with heavy fine Organisation RSF_en May 28, 2021 Find out more News News “We welcome opening of criminal investigation in Lithuania in response to our complaint against Lukashenko” RSF says Receive email alerts Newscenter_img to go further Reporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns the heavy fine that a court in Minsk imposed today on Maryna Zolatava, the editor of the leading news website Tut.by. The fine is just one more attempt to intimidate the few remaining independent media outlets in Belarus, RSF said.Convicted of “negligence” for allegedly letting her staff use the dispatches of the state-owned news agency BelTA without a subscription, Zolatava was ordered to pay a fine of 7,650 rubles and court costs of 6,000 rubles, or a total of more than 5,600 euros – the equivalent of the average annual salary in Belarus.Zolatava and a dozen other journalists were held for several days after raids on Tut.by and the independent news agency BelaPAN last August, when the pro-government media subjected both media outlets to an intense smear campaign. Zolatava, who had faced a possible five-year jail term, was the only one to be tried on criminal charges. Her colleagues were ordered to pay damages to BelTA without being tried.“This heavy fine constitutes the latest act of intimidation against the last independent media outlets in Belarus,” said Johann Bihr, the head of RSF’s Eastern Europe and Central Asia desk. “The way the authorities persisted with this case, which was out of all proportion from the outset, shows their determination to undermine the state media’s rivals. It is high time the international community, especially the European Union, took steps to end the escalating crackdown in Belarus.”During the trial, the defence insisted that Tut.by’s articles were systematically posted after BelTA’s dispatches had been published – a quarter of an hour after their publication for subscribers.Several journalists said they had been pressured to provide testimony for the prosecution. The IP addresses used to access the BelTA website are shared not only by Tut.by’s journalists but by all visitors to Tut.by’s art gallery. Zolatava and her colleagues learned in the course of this case that their phones had been tapped, in violation of the confidentiality of their sources. Zolatava’s trial came amid efforts by the Belarusian authorities to tighten their grip on the media. They include a draconian new media law, blocking of leading news sites and an unprecedented wave of fines against independent journalists. Belarus is ranked 155th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2018 World Press Freedom Index. BelarusEurope – Central Asia Condemning abuses InternetFreedom of expressionEconomic pressureJudicial harassment News RSF at the Belarusian border: “The terrorist is the one who jails journalists and intimidates the public” Russian media boss drops the pretence and defends Belarus crackdown Follow the news on Belarus BelarusEurope – Central Asia Condemning abuses InternetFreedom of expressionEconomic pressureJudicial harassment June 2, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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Planned Parenthood Launches New Telehealth Service That Connects Patients to Care Through a Private, Secure Video

first_img Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * 25 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it STAFF REPORT Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Business News Subscribe faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Donald CommunityPCC- COMMUNITYVirtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Community News Planned Parenthood Launches New Telehealth Service That Connects Patients to Care Through a Private, Secure Video STAFF REPORTS Published on Friday, April 10, 2020 | 11:33 am Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. STAFF REPORT First Heatwave Expected Next Week Community Newscenter_img EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Make a comment More Cool Stuff CITY NEWS SERVICE/STAFF REPORT Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Top of the News HerbeautyWeird Types Of Massage Not Everyone Dares To TryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyCostume That Makes Actresses Beneath Practically UnrecognizableHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyStop Eating Read Meat (Before It’s Too Late)HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWant To Seriously Cut On Sugar? You Need To Know A Few TricksHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 Countries Where Men Have Difficulties Finding A WifeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyAmazing Sparks Of On-Screen Chemistry From The 90-sHerbeautyHerbeauty Community News Planned Parenthood Pasadena & San Gabriel Valley (PPPSGV) has expanded health care access amidst the coronavirus crisis, by successfully launching telehealth services. Telehealth allows patients to access high-quality, affordable health care from a trusted Planned Parenthood medical provider via a computer, laptop, tablet, or smartphone. PPPSGV joins other Planned Parenthood affiliates in providing telehealth services, and was the first California affiliate to connect patients to care through video conferencing during the coronavirus crisis. So far, more than 1,000 patients have been served via telehealth.“We know that our patients’ sexual and reproductive health care can’t wait. As we weather this challenging time together, we don’t want the communities we serve to worry about their birth control, learning pregnancy options, or accessing Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) tests and cancer screenings,” said Sheri Bonner, President & CEO of PPPSGV. “We are doing everything we can to bring services directly to our patients and provide them with the information and care they need in a timely and personalized way. We’re committed to connecting patients to care — no matter what.”Patients can access many Planned Parenthood services from the comfort and safety of their homes through telehealth, including talking to a Planned Parenthood provider through Zoom video conferencing. PPPSGV is committed to answering questions, managing prescriptions, and addressing sexual and reproductive health care needs, remotely. Birth control prescriptions, TransCare appointments, UTI evaluation, Emergency Contraception, and electronically prescribed treatments are currently available through telehealth.Telehealth is helping meet the needs of patients as PPPSGV is currently only accepting urgent in-person visits, which include STI treatment and abortion services at health centers, to keep patients and staff safe. PPPSGV has resumed STI testing at two health centers. Patients can once again receive express testing for gonorrhea, chlamydia, syphilis and HIV from the Baldwin Park and Pasadena health centers.Planned Parenthood encourages everyone to follow the latest guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and local public health officials to reduce the risk of getting any respiratory virus or spreading one to others. This includes washing your hands often with soap and water, avoiding close contact with people who are sick, and practicing social distancing.The safety and health of patients, our staff, and our broader communities remains our highest priority as our country faces an unprecedented public health crisis. Self-isolation and social distancing are ways we can care for ourselves and each other. PPPSGV is also following public health guidance and is asking all patients to wear masks or cloth face coverings when they have appointments in our health centers. Our health is connected, and we can all do our part and take care of ourselves, our health, and our community.For more information about telehealth or to make an appointment, visit PPPSGV.org.About Planned Parenthood Pasadena & San Gabriel ValleyPlanned Parenthood Pasadena & San Gabriel Valley has been serving Northeast Los Angeles and the San Gabriel Valley since we were founded in 1933, 86 years ago. Our mission is to provide broad public access to sexual and reproductive care through: (1) convenient, affordable, and culturally fluent medical services; (2) sex and relationship education for young people, teachers, parents, and the general public; and (3) local, state, and federal advocacy efforts that support these services. Last year, our four health centers in Pasadena, Eagle Rock, Alhambra, and Glendora provided nearly 155,000 birth control services. In 2020, we expanded our services to the Baldwin Park community.“Our service area extends from Glendora to Glendale, and from the San Gabriel Mountains to the San Bernardino freeway, home to 24 communities and a diverse population of 1.4 million people.” Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

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Are Housing Databases Overshadowing Agents?

first_img Previous: Inventory Shortages & Affordability Leading Some Homeowners to Renovate Next: Navigating Safe Harbors and HOAs  Print This Post Are Housing Databases Overshadowing Agents? The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily January 15, 2018 1,855 Views Share Save Home / Daily Dose / Are Housing Databases Overshadowing Agents? in Daily Dose, Featured, Market Studies, News Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago About Author: Nicole Casperson databases HOUSING mortgage 2018-01-15 Nicole Casperson Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Tagged with: databases HOUSING mortgage Nicole Casperson is the Associate Editor of DS News and MReport. She graduated from Texas Tech University where she received her M.A. in Mass Communications and her B.A. in Journalism. Casperson previously worked as a graduate teaching instructor at Texas Tech’s College of Media and Communications. Her thesis will be published by the International Communication Association this fall. To contact Casperson, e-mail: [email protected] Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago At a California Association of Realtors (CAR) recent panel discussion, real estate agents, brokers, and multiple listing service (MLS) operators expressed their concerns that housing databases are causing agent-run property listing services to become unnecessary.Real estate agents utilize MLS’s to serve as the source of information about homes for sale, property details, and insider information to consumers. However, according to a recent article by Mercury News, commercial websites such as Zillow, Redfin, and realtor.com are changing the game. “The world of big data doesn’t seem to have come to the MLS in any meaningful way,” David Silver-Westrick, a Partner at San Clemente-based Keller Williams OC Coastal Realty told Mercury News. “We’re missing the boat on lots of big data opportunities. To the extent that consumers have better tools than we do, we just become irrelevant.”Therefore, CAR is making an effort to create a future for real estate agent run MLS sites, which will help the association meet its 12-year-old goal of forming a single, statewide database in California—the state currently has over 40 MLS’s.Creating a single database for an entire state comes with its concerns, the article notes that during CAR’s panel discussion, two challenges were brought up. The first is the question: Where’s the data coming from? Without a clear direction of where the information is coming from, MLS problems can include inaccurate and outdated data.“As someone who lists and sells real estate, I need it to be more efficient,” said Jeanne Radsick, a real estate agent with Century 21 Tobias Real Estate in Bakersfield. “I need to not have to go to multiple sources to find what I’m looking for.”Another issue, which is attributed in the article as the main issue, is politics. The challenge is figuring out who controls the information—the broker or the MLS? Also, a lot of jobs are at stake under a single MLS system.“These changes in the environment, particularly on the consumer side, have given the consumer … the ability to have information that is equivalent, if not superior, to what the agents have,” said Joel Singer, CEO of the State Realtor Association. “The question is can this current structure survive? Or perhaps the question is should this current structure survive if it doesn’t alter.”The statewide MLS effort has so far led to the creation of the Diamond Bar-based California Regional Multiple Listing Service, which currently represents most of Southern California and the Bay Area.To view the full article, click here. Related Articles Subscribelast_img read more

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Yule traditions deep rooted

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORERose Parade grand marshal Rita Moreno talks New Year’s Day outfit and ‘West Side Story’ remake160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! PASADENA – It was an innocent mistake the year the Rev. Canon Michael Bamberger did not use “O Come All Ye Faithful” as the entrance hymn during Christmas services. Innocent, but it caused a stir. Bamberger quickly discovered the importance of the carol’s placement at the Episcopal Church of the Ascension in Sierra Madre. Phones rang with reminders from parishioners for weeks after the holiday, he said. “It was as if the world ended,” he said. “I heard about it for weeks; calls, disappointment, people saying, `It just wasn’t quite the same.”‘ Bamberger, like other clergy members, says that Christmas traditions are forged in the memories of past celebrations. And some can never be changed. In a year when some churches are bucking tradition by canceling services on Christmas day – so people can spend time with family – other pastors say traditions must be honored. “Christmas is a time when there’s an awful lot of religious and emotional attachment,” Bamberger said. “You can add new stuff, but you better be careful taking away stuff.” Local clergy from mainline denominations say that Christmas traditions, although they might seem unimportant, build community in their congregations through shared experience and a connection to family memories. For regulars, the traditions are almost as important as the holiday itself. And even visitors who only attend churches during Christmas or Easter have strong feelings and expectations, pastors said. The clergy, which often move between congregations, discover the treasured traditions quickly. The Rev. Mark Kliewer came to Westminster Presbyterian Church of Temple City in November, so he’s still learning the members’ preferences. So far, Kliewer’s desire to start singing Christmas carols in early December was met with praise. He was told the previous pastor waited until Christmas, to the disappointment of many. Candlelight is an essential aspect of many Christmas services, though it must be handled with care. Terry Tuvey Allen, pastor of Trinity Lutheran Church in Pasadena still remembers the time her brother set the advent wreath on fire. It was the 1950s and Allen was a toddler. Her older brother was serving as an acolyte and somehow ignited the wreath. The older men jumped from their seats and “stomped it down,” she said. The service ended. Allen said the first year she was at Trinity she considered leaving out the candlelight ceremony. She was told, “Don’t even think about it,” by her worship and music committee. “I think people would say it just didn’t feel like Christmas if we didn’t sing `Silent Night’ and light candles,” Allen said. The tradition goes back more than a century to the Norwegian, Swedish and German roots of the denomination, Allen said. But it’s not just a historical link. The tradition is alive in “the collective memory of Christmas that we all have,” Allen said. “They’re touching their roots,” she said. “It’s so beautiful and the church is dark and all the lights. People calm down for a minute. They have a sense of peace about them and a sense of awe and mystery and that there really is more to life than what we think about all year. That pause gives space to the sacred.” Not all traditions carry such emotional sentiment. Some are just fun, like at Christ the Shepherd Lutheran Church in Altadena, where the congregation calls out requests to the organist at the Christmas day service. The all-request Christmas worship is unique and suits the style of the congregation, said Pastor John Kauffman. The church has about 60 in attendance on a given Sunday, an almost equal mix of Caucasians and African Americans, with about 10percent being gay or lesbian, he said. There are former Catholics, Baptists, Lutherans – people who like gospel music and those who do not. “We really try to do patchwork worship,” Kauffman said of the Christmas service. “It depends on who’s here and who raises their hand first when we take requests.” [email protected] (626)578-6300, Ext.4461last_img
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