Draft decree would end online anonymity, force foreign Internet firms to censor

first_imgNews to go further April 27, 2021 Find out more Organisation RSF_en VietnamAsia – Pacific Vietnam sentences journalist Tran Thi Tuyet Dieu to eight years in prison April 22, 2021 Find out more News Three more independent reporters arrested in Vietnam RSF laureates support jailed Vietnamese journalist Pham Doan Trangcenter_img News VietnamAsia – Pacific Follow the news on Vietnam April 13, 2012 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Draft decree would end online anonymity, force foreign Internet firms to censor Receive email alerts Reporters Without Borders calls on the Vietnamese authorities to abandon plans for a decree that would increase online censorship to an utterly unacceptable level and exacerbate the already very disturbing situation for freedom of expression in Vietnam.According to information provided by the banned pro-democracy movement Viet Tan, which Reporters Without Borders has verified with various sources, the government intends to issue the decree in June. Entitled “Decree on the Management, Provision, Use of Internet Services and Information Content Online,” it would reinforce the already considerable legislative arsenal deployed against dissidents.Using a deliberate vague language that would allow arbitrary interpretation, the current draft of the decree suggests that the government wants to pressgang Internet companies, including foreign ones, into helping it to reinforce online censorship and control of Internet users. Google and Facebook could be among the foreign companies affected.As well as developing the privatization of censorship, it could criminalize any expression of dissident views and reporting of news that strays from the Communist Party official line. It also seeks to prevent journalists, bloggers and netizens from using the protection of pseudonyms when reporting online.Reporters Without Borders urges the Internet companies concerned to resist the government’s pressure to turn them into the accomplices of its censorship. By making them locate servers and data centres in Vietnam, the decree could force them to install filtering and self-censorship systems and to reveal information about their Vietnamese users.Reporters Without Borders would also like to point out to the Vietnamese government that the proposed new provisions could have a negative impact on the economy. Imposing restrictions on the operations of Internet companies could slow growth in a sector that is important for the economy, especially if foreign companies were forced to terminate the services they provide to Vietnamese users because of the draconian conditions imposed.By creating trade barriers, the decree could also be odds with the undertakings that Vietnam has given to the World Trade Organization and the Trans-Pacific Partnership which is currently being negotiated between several countries including Vietnam and the United States.In its current form, the proposed decree would:- Force Internet users to use their real names.- Ban Internet users from “abusing the Internet” to oppose the government, reveal confidential government information or spread defamatory information.- Force foreign companies that provide online services such as social networking, blogging, discussion forums and chat to cooperate with the Vietnamese government and provide it with the information it needs to crack down on activities banned by the decree. It could also force them to locate data centres in Vietnam and open offices there.- Make all news websites subject to government approval and force them to comply with existing media laws. Website administrators would have to report any banned online activities to authorities. Those responsible for “personal” blogs would have to post their names and contact information and would be held accountable for the content they posted.In order to head off any destabilization attempts in the wake of the Arab spring, the government has reinforced repressive measures and controls in recent months, relying above all on surveillance and arrests, as well as increased online filtering.Vietnam is on the Reporters Without Borders list of “Enemies of the Internet.” With a total of 18 netizens currently detained for expressing their views freely online, it is the world’s third biggest prison for bloggers and cyber-dissidents, after China and Iran. Help by sharing this information News April 7, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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Ayacucho-based journalist still being harassed and threatened five months after escaping targeted explosion

first_img February 10, 2017 Find out more to go further April 1, 2020 Find out more Help by sharing this information China’s diplomats must stop attacking media over coronavirus reporting Follow the news on Peru December 4, 2019 Find out more PeruAmericas RSF_en Latin American media: under control of families, economic and political elites Receive email alerts Latin America’s community radio – a key service but vulnerable News News News News Organisation Reporters Without Borders calls on the police to reinstate the protection which Elías Navarro Palomino, La República’s correspondent in the southern city of Ayacucho, had been getting until January. Navarro has continued to receive constant threats since dynamite was exploded near his home last September. Elías Navarro Palomino, the editor of the local weekly Línea Roja and correspondent of the national daily La República, has told Reporters Without Borders he is still being threatened five months after he was the target of dynamite explosion (see release of 4 October 2006). In the latest incident, two strangers came looking for him at his home in the southern city of Ayacucho at night and questioned neighbours about him.“The authorities clearly do not understand the extent of the danger to which Navarro has been exposed since the 30 September bombing and the many threats and attacks he has received before and afterwards,” Reporters Without Borders said. “The protection he was getting until January should be extended. And we are surprised the investigation into the September incident has not produced any result.”The National Association of Journalists (ANP) reported that two unidentified women knocked on the doors of Navarro’s neighbours on the night of 24 February trying to locate where he lives. They asked one neighbour: “Does Elías Navarro Palomino, the La República journalist, live here? In the house opposite, they said he does.” The neighbour finally told them where he lived. The two women immediately knocked on Navarro’s door and asked his young daughter, who opened, if he lived there. They went on to ask how many people lived there and if any members of the family were away on a trip. After interrogating the girl, they asked her to fetch an adult. But by the time Navarro came to the door, they had fled.“I have constantly been threatened by telephone since the 30 September bombing,” he told Reporters Without Borders. “I had police protection until the end of January, but not any more. So I have to be on the watch, especially at night, when I sometimes see suspicious people prowling around my home. All this is linked to my reporting on corruption. I am very worried for myself and my family.”Navarro is convinced that all of this is linked to his work as a journalist. He also says be is “worried about the fate of the Peruvian press.”In the 30 September incident, a dynamite charge was set off near his home after he reported on a case of alleged embezzlement in a savings and loans cooperative based in Santa María Magdalena. He had been attacked and threatened prior to that. March 1, 2007 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Ayacucho-based journalist still being harassed and threatened five months after escaping targeted explosion PeruAmericas last_img read more

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Colombia to get access to NATO technology to fight terrorism

first_img Colombia’s Armed Forces and National Police both have an excellent reputation for being effective and efficient in fighting global terrorism and domestic crime, Ortiz said. That reputation is why security officials from other countries seek training from Colombia’s military and police forces, he explained. “Colombia has played an increasingly prominent role in police training in Central America and has also built stronger ties with countries like Mexico, Peru and Chile through the Pacific Alliance,” Ortiz said. “There is nothing strange about Colombia looking to strengthen ties with both its existing Latin American partners as well as NATO member countries.” Colombia is not the only country whose security forces are known internationally. In recent years, the Armed Forces of Argentina and Chile have also provided support to NATO troops in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Ortiz pointed out. Access to NATO technology When finalized, the agreement could give Colombian security officials access to advanced NATO technology, such as advanced computer simulations of maritime interdictions. Colombia and NATO have no training exercises or other activities scheduled. Colombian officials and NATO representatives will discuss the best way to maximize go forward with the accord, said Alexander Vershbow, NATO deputy secretary general. “We welcome Colombia’s interest in cooperating with NATO,” said Alexander Vershbow, NATO Deputy Secretary General. “While there is no immediate plan for establishing a formal partnership between the Alliance and Colombia, we are exploring the possibility of carrying out specific activities together.” The agreement will help Colombian security forces fight global terrorism, Pinzón said. “This agreement gives us the possibility to exchange information with an organization comprising the 28 most-recognized democracies in the world,” Pinzón said. “These countries can also gain access to Colombia’s experience in the fight against drug trafficking and terrorism.” International cooperation Access to advanced technology Colombia a ‘global player’ Colombia will not be able to become a member state of NATO because of its geographic location, Ortiz said. Colombia is a member of the Union of South American Nations (UNASUR), which is similar to NATO, Ortiz said. “It´s quite straightforward really. A stronger alliance with NATO offers Colombia access to (NATO’s) computer simulations advanced technological development techniques and its best practices in relation to transparency, humanitarian operations and strengthening the army,” Ortiz said. “On the other hand Colombia offers a wealth of expertise in using combined military and police tactics to root out terrorists in both remote rural enclaves and urban jungles.” In addition to computer simulations, NATO has other technology that could be helpful to Colombian security forces. For example, in September 2013, NATO tested a device which stops the vehicles of suicide bombers before they reach their targets. The device uses a high-intensity electromagnetic beam to turn off engine vehicles. Testing of the device is scheduled to be completed in 2014, according to published reports. center_img Colombia recently took an important step toward finalizing a cooperation agreement with the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) involving the sharing of intelligence to fight international terrorism. On Sept. 11, 2013, Defense Minister Juan Carlos Pinzón presented a bill to Congress to approve the ratification of the cooperation agreement. That accord was informally reached on June 25, 2013, when Colombia’s Defense Ministry signed the cooperation agreement with NATO. “If we can achieve peace, the army will be in a place where it will be able to distinguish itself internationally as well. We are already doing it on many fronts,” Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos said after the accord was signed. The cooperation agreement was signed four months after Colombian security officials attended NATO’s annual Building Integrity conference, held in February 2013 in Monterrey, California. By Dialogo October 30, 2013 Over the past decade, Colombian security forces have provided training in how to battle global terrorism to officials in Afghanistan and countries in Latin America, the Caribbean, Europe, and West Africa, according to Pinzón. Colombian security forces have trained more than 15,000 soldiers and police officers from more than 40 countries in how to fight drug trafficking and extortion and how to engage in maritime interdiction and jungle combat. The Colombian Armed Forces and National Police have earned a reputation for fighting terrorism, explained Roman Ortiz, the director of Decisive Points, a Colombian national security and defense affairs company. For decades, Colombian security forces have battled the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and the National Liberation Army (ELN). “Colombia is now moving fast as a global player in exporting security know-how, built up through 50 years battling drug traffickers and organized crime groups,” Ortiz said. In October 2013, Colombia hosted a global conference in International Humanitarian Law (IHL) and an General Assembly meeting of Interpol, in Cartagena. The primary threats faced by NATO countries include nuclear proliferation, terrorism, cyber-attacks, organized crime, drug trafficking, and the volatility within failed states, according to Carmen Romero, NATO Deputy Spokesperson. “No country or organisation can deal with these challenges on its own and that is why NATO is working with countries around the globe that share the same values and security concerns as NATO,” said Romero. “Colombia has strong expertise in counter-narcotics and counter-insurgency operations and we look forward to developing our dialogue with Bogota in these areas,” said Romero. Increasing prominencelast_img read more

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