Michael’s massive money drive for cancer support

first_imgLimerick on Covid watch list RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Advertisement Print Linkedin WhatsApp TechPost | Episode 9 | Pay with Google, WAZE – the new Google Maps? and Speak don’t Type! Facebook NewsCommunityHealthMichael’s massive money drive for cancer supportBy Bernie English – August 9, 2019 274 Emailcenter_img Twitter Housing 37 Compulsory Purchase Orders issued as council takes action on derelict sites Michael Quinlan presenting a cheque for €9,420, the proceeds of his daffodil day fundraising 2019 to Paul Clements Supporter Services Officer irish Cancer society. This was the largest amount Michael has raised in his 31 years fundraising for Daffodil Day. To date he has raised €137,920A LIMERICK MAN who has lost eight relatives to cancer has raised a massive €137,920 for cancer support services.Michael Quinlivan (67) from Thomondgate has been fundraising for the Irish Cancer Society for the last 29 years.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Last week, he presented his latest cheque to the Irish Cancer Society for €9,420, the proceeds of the Daffodil Day fundraiser and his largest year’s collection so far.And he has good reason to be aware of the pain, loss and suffering caused by the disease having lost his dad, his brother, his uncle and five cousins to cancer.“There is not one person you speak to who hasn’t been touched by this in some way,” he told the Limerick Post.One person so affected is his sister-in-law ‘Dollie” Quinlivan whose husband died from cancer.Michael sells daffodils and Society merchandise in the Milk Market on four Saturdays in March to coincide with Daffodil Day.“After her husband died, Dollie went and sat her driving test at 72 years of age and passed it. She drives down to give me a break at the Milk Market and drives me home afterwards with any unsold merchandise,” Michael explained.Michael began his fundraising by selling daffodils in the Revenue Commissioners office where he worked. He was also selling merchandise and that went down well.“People wanted to do more than just buy a flower, so I brought in things like mugs and keyrings and trolley discs. It meant people had something they could use for the money they gave”.And now that the Revenue service has been decentralised, his former colleagues have branched out and they are now selling daffodils and merchandise for his fundraising efforts.From in-house sales, Michael moved on to selling his flowers at Colbert train station.“I go up around 5.30am to catch the early commuters,” he explained. The €8,500 he raised this year would have been even more if Daffodil day hadn’t coincided with the Irish Rail day of industrial action.“This money helps people with cancer to stay in their own homes with home nursing and night nursing. That mean’s a lot to someone with cancer and their families,” he told the Limerick Post. TAGSCommunityhealthLimerick City and CountyNews Limerick Post Show | Careers & Health Sciences Event for TY Students Shannon Airport braced for a devastating blow Previous articleLimerick Post Show | Greg O’Shea lands back from Love IslandNext articleResidents in row over Mill Road plans Bernie Englishhttp://www.limerickpost.ieBernie English has been working as a journalist in national and local media for more than thirty years. She worked as a staff journalist with the Irish Press and Evening Press before moving to Clare. She has worked as a freelance for all of the national newspaper titles and a staff journalist in Limerick, helping to launch the Limerick edition of The Evening Echo. Bernie was involved in the launch of The Clare People where she was responsible for business and industry news. Local backlash over Aer Lingus threatlast_img read more

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Russia: Moscow Schoolchildren Visit Northern Fleet

first_imgGroup of Moscow schoolchildren arrived at Northern Fleet (NF). Soon they will visit the flagship of Russian Navy – aircraft-carrying cruiser Admiral Flota Sovetskogo Soyuza Kuznetsov.Visiting the aircraft carrier which was recently deployed to the North Atlantic and the Mediterranean, schoolchildren will chat with sailors and officers participated in that long-range cruise, familiarize with the ship, living and service conditions of naval mariners.The visit of Moscow schoolchildren to Admiral Kuznetsov is arranged under trilateral patronage agreement between the carrier’s commanding staff, Hero of the Soviet Union N.G. Kuznetsov Foundation, and administration of 1465-th Education Center named after Admiral N.G. Kuznetsov (Moscow).According to NF Deputy Commander for Personnel Affairs RADM Anatoly Minakov, that agreement was tied in order to cooperate in patriotic education of the younger generation. Recently, it was a 5-year anniversary of the agreement. Throughout this time, the fleet hosts Moscow guests and offers them museum excursions and on board trips.When in the Murmansk region, schoolchildren will visit not only aircraft carrier Admiral Kuznetsov but NF Marine Regiment deployed next to Norwegian border. They will get acquainted with different types of small arms and watch service conditions of conscription servicemen.Several days of the visit to Murmansk region will be full of cultural events. Moscow kids will meet with Severomorsk schoolchildren, visit NF Museum, its branch K-21 submarine, Naval Aviation Museum, Murmansk Regional Museum, and other cultural institutions.[mappress]Naval Today Staff , March 28, 2012; Image: mengxiang View post tag: Northern View post tag: fleet Back to overview,Home naval-today Russia: Moscow Schoolchildren Visit Northern Fleet Russia: Moscow Schoolchildren Visit Northern Fleet View post tag: Moscow View post tag: Schoolchildren Share this articlecenter_img View post tag: Navy View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Visit March 28, 2012 Training & Education View post tag: Navallast_img read more

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Author delivers lecture on free speech

first_imgDr. Keith Whittington never expected to write on the topic of free speech. As Whittington introduced himself before his lecture on his new book, “Speak Freely: Why Universities Must Defend Free Speech,” on Thursday afternoon, he explained that he set aside projects more related to his specialty in constitutional interpretation to focus on an issue he could no longer ignore.“I think it’s critically important that we collectively think seriously about what it is we want universities to do and what that implies about how we ought to conduct ourselves on campuses and what we ought to tolerate and engage in on college campuses,” Whittington said.Whittington spoke as part of the Constitutional Studies’ effort to delve into American society’s conflicted attitude toward free speech and how it affects the conversations on college campuses. Whittington said that the issue of free speech is not a new one but that the American people have been grappling with its implications for as long as public opinion surveys have been used in research.“Regardless of what kind of audience you ask, whether it’s the mass public or lawyers or college students or the like, overwhelmingly Americans tend to say that they value free speech, they value the First Amendment, they value tolerance, they think all those things are very important,” he said. “But then when you start pressing them on, ‘Well, what about this particular example of speech that you find particularly repellent?’ well, then they start trying to carve out exceptions.”This dilemma, Whittington said, is part of the challenge of living in a liberal democracy, and it requires us to accept that supporting free speech means tolerating speech that is at times troubling. Whittington said this tolerance is especially important on college campuses, where the pursuit of knowledge is tantamount.“In the context of a university in particular, we’re particularly concerned with trying to press forward to better understand the world,” he said. “And pressing forward to better understand the world means leaving lots of space open for people to make mistakes, for people to ask hard questions, for people to come to uncomfortable answers in response to those hard questions. Universities lose a lot of their value if they can’t get to that anymore.”Throughout his lecture, Whittington discussed the importance of having an open environment conducive to what he called “robust intellectual inquiry,” which means issues of free speech and universities are intimately connected both for that reason and for the danger of allowing universities any power that could be used to suppress speech.“I think campus officials will do what they’ve always done, which is try to suppress speech they find particularly embarrassing and that they think might provoke public controversy and might draw unwanted news attention,” Whittington said. “That will stretch across a wide range of different conversations. That will sometimes mean silencing speakers on the right but also mean silencing speakers on the left. It will sometimes mean silencing minority speakers and sometimes it will mean silencing other kinds of speakers.”An attack on any kind of free speech, Whittington said, is an attack on all free speech; a speaker with views outside the norm can still have something to contribute to the conversation. Yet controversy for controversy’s sake, Whittington said, should never be the goal of inviting a speaker to campus.“When we’re making decisions about whom to invite to campus to speak, the goal should be neither to stack the deck with our closest allies nor to sprinkle in the most extreme provocateurs,” Whittington said. “The goal should be to make available to the campus community at large thoughtful representatives of serious ideas.”That responsibility to choose speakers wisely lies with both faculty and students since students deserve to have power over the debates in which they engage. Whittington said protest is a form of intellectual exploration and advocacy and that students have a right to protest, as long as their efforts do not destroy the free speech of others.“It’s perfectly reasonable to protest those ideas, to complain about those ideas, to have a public conversation about whether or not the given speaker has good ideas or bad ideas, whether or not it’s a good idea to invite a given speaker to campus and the like,” Whittington said. “But disruptions, disinvitations, tearing down signs, throwing out papers are all efforts to quash the communication of ideas and shut down the free exchange of ideas among students and others on the college campus rather than to advance that free exchange of ideas by advancing better ideas in their stead.”Ultimately, Whittington argued, university administration, faculty and students must allow themselves to be challenged in order to continue the debates integral to the purpose of the university.“If students are to prepare themselves to critically engage the wide range of perspectives and problems they will encounter in the world across their lifetimes, they must learn to grapple with and critically examine ideas they find difficult and offensive,” Whittington said. “ … Recognizing and respecting the principles of free speech is challenging, but there is no alternative if we are dedicated to pursue truth. And ultimately, to pursue truth is the noble and important mission of the modern American university.”Tags: Free speech, keith whittingtonlast_img read more

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