Jobs saved

first_imgLocal backlash over Aer Lingus threat Previous articleMother-of-five stages Council sit-inNext article€320,000 award for crash victim who avoided foxes Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie TAGSfeaturedFine GaelSenator Tony MulcahyShannonTransaero NewsLocal NewsJobs savedBy Alan Jacques – April 23, 2015 661 Facebook THE Shannon-based Transaero aircraft maintenance firm has emerged from High Court protection after a three-month period of examinership succeeded in saving the jobs of 230 employees and 40 contract workers. Congratulating the company’s management and staff, local Fine Gael Senator Tony Mulcahy said it was a hugely positive story as it secured the future of a significant aircraft maintenance facility but also gave confidence to other operators considering investment in Shannon. “It is important that Transaero’s customers and suppliers are also acknowledged for their support for the company. This important Shannon operation can move forward with confidence and I am particularly delighted that job security has now been confirmed.” RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR No vaccines in Limerick yet WhatsApp Printcenter_img Walk in Covid testing available in Limerick from Saturday 10th April Email Linkedin Twitter Advertisement Shannon Airport braced for a devastating blow Is Aer Lingus taking flight from Shannon? New high-end jobs for Shannonlast_img read more

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Team discovers new MRSA treatment

first_imgA team of researches led by Professor Shahriar Mobashery and Mayland Chang developed an antibiotic to combat Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, a strain of a certain species of bacteria that is resistant to a considerable number of conventional modern antibiotics.“MRSA is a multi-drug resistant version of a very common bacterium called staph aureus,” Mobashery said. “Staph aureus grows in our skin, grows in our noses, and has been with humanity for a very long time. However, this version, which is drug resistant, first appeared in 1962 in the U.K. and has become a global problem.”Mobashery said understanding the biochemical properties of MRSA that allow it to resist the effects of conventional antibiotics gave them valuable information and resources to develop an antibiotic to respond to the problem.“How does this organism have these biochemical properties that make it so difficult for treatment? That is a question my lab concerns itself with,” Mobashery said. “We want to understand the basis for the drug resistance this very difficult organism has developed over the many decades after its appearance.“When we understand some of the details of the biochemical event, can we subvert them in a way that leads to the demise of the organism? The answer to that question is yes, and we have come up with strategies that lend themselves to specifically addressing the methods that MRSA has devised for resistance,” he said. “We are actually able to take that and turn [them] around to … kill the organism.”Mobashery said finding and developing the drug to exploit the weaknesses he and his team found in MRSA was a massive computational undertaking, narrowing  over 1.2 million candidates to just 118 compounds.“1.2 compounds were so called ‘docked’ and ‘scored’ and … then, out of a collection of 2,500 compounds that had promise, we did some further analysis on which one of those were worthy of pursuit because not all of them were easy to synthesize. So we wanted to ideally buy some of these compounds,” he said.“We ended up choosing the 118 compounds … because they were commercially available and synthetically accessible.”Mobashery said the compounds were observed to effectively destroy MRSA in mice infected with the bacteria and that he saw a promising future for his work with the organism with the help of the University and collaboration with other researchers,” Mobashery said.“In principle, the University is very much interested in exploring whether companies will step up and move this class of molecules forward into clinical trials. That is something we won’t be able to do ourselves and we need partners and that’s a possibility. But research is ongoing on MRSA because of our broad interest in this organism and I’ve been at it for something like a dozen years and I trust that in a dozen years I’ll still be at it.”Tags: antibiotic, drug-resistant bacteria, Mayland Chang, MRSA, Shariar Mobasherylast_img read more

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Dorms begin to decorate for Christmas season

first_imgIt’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas on campus. Though there may not be snow on the ground, many dorms have already begun to get into the Christmas spirit by decking the halls with unique decorations.Rosie LoVoi From the outside, passersby can see Breen-Phillips Hall’s Christmas spirit shining through candles in the windows that are put out every year after Thanksgiving, Ashley Huffman — Breen-Phillips’ president — said.However, Breen-Phillips residents get more excited about competitive holiday-themed section decorating, Huffman said.“Each section will choose a theme, and everyone in the section decorates the whole hallway with that theme,” Huffman said. “We have judges come in and pick a winning section. … This year, we’re announcing the winner at a Christmas Party.”Past themes have included “Creaster” (a blend of Christmas and Easter), Harry Potter and naughty and nice. Most of the decorations are handmade, Huffman said.“The candles look really pretty when you see them on the quad, but [it’s] especially the decorations in the sections people really like,” Huffman said. “It’s cool to see, but it’s also cool to see all the sections because all the girls can work together and have fun doing that together.”Pasquerilla West Hall celebrates the holiday season with a tradition not to be found anywhere else on campus: a lighting and decorating ceremony of the bush located in the center of the roundabout in front of the dorm.“We have the ugly bush lighting ceremony every year around Christmas time,” Allison Huffman, Pasquerilla West’s president, said. “Everyone stands in a circle around the ugly bush, and we count down to the lighting of the bush. Once the lights are plugged in, everyone sings our ugly bush song to the tune of ‘O’ Christmas Tree.’ After singing, we go inside and have a memory night and look at all of the pictures from the past semester.”This year, Pasquerilla West will light the ugly bush Tuesday.“The ugly bush is unique to PW, so I think that a tradition only we have makes the girls in PW feel special and connected to something,” Huffman said. “It is also just a weird tradition, but it is fun and brings us all together.”The McGlinn shamrock shines as the dorm’s own Christmas star for the Christmas season. The shamrock was made by a student around 10 years ago to rival O’Neil’s signature “O wreath,” McGlinn president Madeline Petrovich said.“Around 10 years ago, a girl in McGlinn actually made it when she wanted to put something up for Christmas,” Petrovich said. “She made it with wires  and put the lights on. I guess it fell apart, but the workers who put it up fixed it, and they still put it up every year. … It goes up every year around Christmas.”Though the shamrock, made of garland, wires and lights in the shape of a giant shamrock, isn’t a traditional Christmas symbol, it has become one for the dorm over the years, Petrovich said. This year, the shamrock will be put up on Dec. 5.“Most people really appreciate it when you’re walking back from the library at an ungodly hour for finals and you turn around the corner on South Dining Hall and you see it,” Petrovich said. “It’s very nice, kind of calming. You’re like, ‘Alright, it’s Christmas.’”Tags: christmas, decorations, dormlast_img read more

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Chaput Family Farms to hold ‘Cow Power’ open house October 8

first_imgChaput Family Farms, Vermont Electric Cooperative, Inc. and Central Vermont Public Service will host a free Cow Power Open House Oct. 8 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the farm at 2473 Route 105 East in North Troy. Farm tours, renewable energy information and a free picnic lunch will be available.Chaput Family Farms began generating power from cow manure on Aug. 3, 2010, and is expected to produce about 1.6 million kilowatt-hours of electricity annually. It is the third farm in VEC’s service territory producing clean renewable energy from cow manure through collaborative efforts of VEC and the CVPS Cow Powerâ ¢ program. The farm is the seventh to join CVPS Cow Powerâ ¢. It is expected to provide enough energy for nearly 250 homes.‘The project is beneficial on so many levels for our dairy operation,’ said Reg Chaput. ‘We’re excited to be producing electricity and we want to share this excitement with our friends, neighbors and vendors. This will be a fun and educational day for people of all ages.‘We also appreciate the grants from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Vermont Clean Energy Development Fund, CVPS Renewable Development Fund and the Vermont Agency of Agriculture,’ Chaput said.‘USDA Rural Development is committed to helping farmers develop renewable energy systems that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions and protect the environment,’ said Molly Lambert, USDA Rural Development state director. ‘Projects like the Chaput Family Farms anaerobic digester facilitate the growth of a strong rural economy by providing a steady source of clean energy and providing real opportunities for the next generation, so that Vermont remains a great place to live, work and raise a family.’Chaput Family Farms is a partnership of Reg and Mike Chaput, and was the result of the consolidation of four farms owned individually by Mike, Reg, and their father, Leo.Chaput Family Farms milk about 830 cows every day and have over 1,000 other dairy animals on the farm, including new calves and other young stock. Chaput Family Farms has been recognized over the years with numerous Milk Quality Awards and was awarded a Vermont Dairy of Distinction award in 2007. In 2010 it also became the first dairy operation in Vermont to receive the Governor’s Award on Workplace Safety.VEC worked closely with the Chaputs on the interconnection process. ‘It’s important for us to ensure there are no adverse impacts to our system or other VEC members’ service quality,’ said Dean Denis, VEC Distribution Manager and Project Manager for the Chaput project. ‘We are pleased that through collaborative efforts of Chaput Family Farms, VEC and CVPS, a third farm in the Co-op’s territory is generating clean renewable energy.’The farm’s new digester will provide electric energy to the Vermont grid, while CVPS Cow Powerâ ¢ will purchase renewable energy certificates and all environmental attributes of the energy production system. CVPS customers can choose to receive all, half or quarter of their electrical energy through Cow Power, and pay a premium of 4 cents per kilowatt hour. It goes to participating farm-producers, to purchase renewable energy credits when enough farm energy isn’t available, or to the CVPS Renewable Development Fund. The fund provides grants to farm owners to develop on-farm generation.CVPS provided Chaput Family Farms a grant of $100,000 to help underwrite start-up costs through its Renewable Development Fund.Soruce: CVPS. 10.6.2010last_img read more

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