June 5, 2018 Police Blotter

first_imgJune 5, 2018 Police Blotter060518 Decatur County 911 Report060518 Ripley County Jail Report060518 Decatur County Fire Report060518 Decatur County Law Report060518 Decatur County Jail Report060518 Decatur County EMS Reportlast_img

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Ministry of Culture, Youth and Sport staff offers full support to Ramson

first_imgRECENTLY appointed Minister of Culture, Youth and Sport, Charles Ramson Jr, was given all assurance by staff members at the entity, that he will receive their fullest support. It was Ramson’s first meeting with his staff yesterday, following which he was given a tour of the Ministry’s Main Street, Georgetown office by Permanent Secretary, Melissa Tucker.“Ramson received all assurances that the Ministry’s staff stands ready to support him in advancing the development of Culture, Youth and Sport in Guyana,” the Ministry said via a statement on their facebook page. Ramson hinted at some key changes with regards to  sports and culture as administered in Guyana, and urged all to get on board.According to new Minister, he’s looking forward to working with the team at the Ministry and thanked them all in advance for their  support. (Rawle Toney)last_img read more

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Hundreds turn out in opposition towards oyster farming licences for Ballyness Bay

first_imgHundreds of people turned out in west Donegal last night in opposition towards proposals for oyster farming licences on Ballyness Bay in Cloughaneely.More than 700 showed for the public meeting in Falcarragh that was organised by the ‘Save Ballyness Bay’ committee.A petition that was set up to raise community awareness regarding the proposed multiple applications for aquaculture licences in Ballyness Bay registered almost 3000 signatures. A spokesperson for the group said: “(There was an) amazing turnout for the Save Ballyness Bay Public Meeting in Falcarragh.“Thank you to all who attended and all those that we’re unable to come along but were there in spirit.”The proposed aquaculture licence applications in Ballyness Bay have sparked concern among locals who fear the development will negatively impact the natural area and tourism.Ballyness Bay as a Special Area of Conservation due to its important features and the unique wildlife species that it shelters. Community members are worried about the ecological damage that any future development could cause. They are also concerned about the impact on jobs if the industrial site affects the beauty of the area and harms tourism. The ‘Save Ballyness Bay’ action group is calling on the Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Mr Michael Creed T.D to reconsider allowing the bay to be used by the shellfish farming industry.The Falcarragh Tidy Towns Committee, Clean Coast Committee, the Cloughaneely Angling Association and many individuals have written to the Minister to express their concerns. Máire Uí Bhaoill of the Tidy Towns organisation wrote: “This is an underprivileged area economically where we depend to a large degree on tourism and on our natural beauty to attract visitors to the area. “As a community we are outraged that anyone should presume to threaten what is precious and delicate to us without any consultation or indeed any regard for us, something that will have negative implications on our local area both socially and economically, as well as aesthetically.”Hundreds turn out in opposition towards oyster farming licences for Ballyness Bay was last modified: August 12th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Ballyness BaySave Ballyness Baylast_img read more

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Underground Oceans Can’t Last Forever

first_img(Visited 46 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 If Pluto and Enceladus have oceans under the crust, why are they still liquid after billions of years?You can’t see them, but they must be there. Oceans under the crusts of planets and icy moons, inferred from orbital mechanics and geology, serve as working hypotheses to explain anomalies found by space probes. They were not predicted before the spacecraft sent back photos of weird surfaces. Enceladus and Pluto are recent candidates for oceanic worlds.Scientists on the New Horizons team have started considering an underground ocean at Pluto. In “Present-day subsurface ocean on Pluto?” Science Daily infers hidden sloshing seas from surface features that would have been different without a global ocean under the crust. Conor Gearin writes on New Scientist, “Pluto must have liquid ocean or it’d look like an overripe peach.” Telltale wrinkles of a shrunken, dry crust are not apparent. According to Astrobiology Magazine, this was not exactly a ho-hum expectation of planetary science:“That’s amazing to me,” Hammond said. “The possibility that you could have vast liquid water ocean habitats so far from the sun on Pluto — and that the same could also be possible on other Kuiper belt objects as well — is absolutely incredible.”Science Daily doesn’t answer how such an ocean could survive for billions of years, but New Scientist takes a stab at that problem, saying that Francis Nimmo pondered the possibility back in 2011. He “argued that the dwarf planet’s icy shell could insulate an ocean,” and now feels vindicated by Pluto’s findings. Astrobiology Magazine suggests that “exotic ices” might be good insulators, provided the crust is 260 km thick or more.Planetary scientists have been toying with subsurface oceans at Enceladus for the last decade since Cassini found geysers erupting (see Space.com review of Saturn’s 2nd moon). “An ocean lies a few kilometers beneath Saturn’s moon Enceladus’s icy surface,” Science Daily announced from indirect indications and physical models. The new estimate is much thinner (5 km) than initially modeled (30-60 km). Ideas about whatever Enceladus has under its crust are evolving faster than the crust itself.Back at Pluto another astonishing discovery has been refined: a super-canyon on the moon Charon that is longer and deeper than the Grand Canyon. It’s five times as deep as Arizona’s, Astrobiology Magazine says, and 150 miles longer – remarkable for a world much smaller than Earth. Another record may be set: “There appear to be locations along the canyon’s length where sheer cliffs reaching several miles high occur, and which could potentially rival Verona Rupes on Uranus’ moon Miranda (which is at least 3 miles, or 5 kilometers, high) for the title of tallest known cliff face in the solar system.”Geologists and mineralogists should take a look at Space.com‘s article about graphite. Apparently several solar system worlds have generated this pencil-lead form of carbon, including Mercury, asteroid Ceres, and Pluto’s moon Charon. “Graphitized carbon forms when carbon is heated to high temperatures in the absence of oxygen,” the article explains. Therein lies a puzzle: carbon was found on Charon, but not on Pluto. Cassini scientist Amanda Hendrix can’t explain it; it blows away her theory about how graphite forms from the solar wind.Hendrix called these results surprising. Radiation from the solar wind should be significantly weaker at Charon than it is at Ceres, because Charon lies, on average, about 10 times farther from the sun than Ceres does. If the moon’s surface is covered with graphite, she said, “it likely formed a different way.“With all the talk of water, water everywhere, hydrobioscopy can’t be far behind. New Scientist remarks, “Pluto probably has a rocky seabed, which could provide the chemicals needed for life.” And Science Daily, less concerned about keeping water liquid for billions of years, comments, “This suggests that there is a strong heat source in the interior of Enceladus, an additional factor supporting the possible emergence of life in its ocean.” The focus should be on what kind of heat source could last for billions of years.These findings should represent severe problems for old-agers. Oceans on tiny icy worlds or dwarf planets should not last for billions of years, to say nothing of geysers. Nor should deep, sharp-sided canyons. So instead of looking clueless, planetary scientists change the subject to talk about how life might have ’emerged’ out there. This is like a fast-talking athlete distracting attention by committing a foul while he tells a funny joke to the referee.last_img read more

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Consider formulating a river regulation policy: HC to Maharashtra

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Meet the Man Who Preserved Decades of NBA History

His hobby nonetheless might have stalled decades ago if he hadn’t connected with his best single box-score source, a kindred spirit who collected NBA stats for a living: Harvey Pollack. The Philadelphia 76ers’ director of statistical information has been working in pro basketball since before the NBA, debuting with the league’s forerunner, the Basketball Association of America, in 1946. The two men aren’t clear on when they began collaborating. Pfander said in a telephone interview he thinks it was 1956; Pollack, who is 92, recalled that they started working together when he expanded his annual NBA stats book in the 1970s. They met at most a few times, but they communicated at least a dozen times each year by phone and mail.Pollack, who has worked for the Sixers since the team’s first season in 1963-64, was also collecting box scores for every game, though his collection didn’t go back as far as Pfander’s. Pollack would send Pfander his book of box scores, and Pfander would send back results of his data analysis — tidbits such as when the league’s millionth point was scored. That archival work helped when the NBA marked later milestone league totals. “He’s the one who started with it,” Pollack said. “That was his idea. I’ve kept it alive ever since.”Pollack put many of these small discoveries in his annual books, always crediting Pfander, whose stats were meticulously calculated and, before he started using a computer, meticulously handwritten, with a fountain pen. “He has the best handwriting you have ever seen,” said his daughter Colleen Greff.Pfander said he used to check the box scores Pollack sent, to make sure the numbers added up. Then he would generate 33 or 34 different stats for Pollack in return. Pollack said his latest book includes at least 40 stats furnished by Pfander.Filling holes in the recordPart of the fun of sports is measuring today’s players and teams against their predecessors, and you can’t do that without a complete record of what past players did. Every sport’s fan base includes completists, people who feel unsettled by the lack of certainty in the records.Ten years ago, Justin Kubatko founded the website Basketball-Reference.com as a resource for fans who want to know every detail about basketball history. Seven years ago, he left his job teaching statistics at Ohio State University to work full time on basketball stats.Before he connected with Pfander, Kubatko had game-by-game data on his site going back only to the mid-1980s.“I’m a completist,” Kubatko said in a telephone interview. “It did kind of bug me. We had 40 years of information that was just not there. I was also a realist. I knew there was really no easy way to acquire that data.”Kubatko doesn’t recall when he first heard of Pfander’s box-score collection — perhaps from the discussion boards at the basketball analytics site APBR.org, where Pfander has been a frequent topic of discussion. “I got his contact information, we talked for a few weeks, we worked out a deal, and we bought what he had,” Kubatko said. “He is an extremely generous and extremely nice man.”By this time, Pfander had digitized his box scores, scanning and sorting them — meticulously, of course. The disk Kubatko received, in 2008, had folders for each year and subfolders for months and for days. Even so, the box scores were saved as images, not spreadsheets or databases, so it wasn’t easy to add them to a stats database.Kubatko sat on the trove for at least a year. “Then we said, ‘You know what, this is kind of silly,’” he recalled. “People are probably interested in what we have as it is.” He wrote a script to link the team abbreviations Pfander used with those on the site and to pair each scan with that game’s unique Basketball Reference ID. Then he fixed the mismatches that arose from errors in the box scores or in the site’s schedule data.In January 2012, Kubatko announced that Basketball Reference now had every box score for every NBA game. His blog post credited Pfander, “who did the lion’s share of the work for this project.” At Grantland a few days later, Robert Mays wrote about the pair and Pfander’s unlikely collection.Fans wouldn’t be able to work with the old stats, though, until Kubatko could get the games into the database. He found Sean Wrona, a champion competitive typist, who “keyed in all this stuff for us off the scans, and we paid him to do that,” Kubatko said. “He did the first several seasons we put out there. All I’ll say is I found a more efficient way to handle the other seasons.”Wrona said in an email1Presumably typed quickly: He’s been clocked above 250 words per minute. that each box score took him about 10 minutes, or just five when it was abbreviated and missing some statistical categories. “Accuracy is far more important than speed for archival work (unlike for competitive typing, where raw speed is far more important), so I don’t come close to my peak typing speed while archiving, but it still helps,” Wrona said. He continues to do data-entry work for Sports Reference, Basketball Reference’s parent company.Wrona’s typing was the fastest part of the project. To merit inclusion in the database, a box score had to make sense: Players’ numbers had to add up to team totals, for instance. Newspaper box scores are the first draft of basketball statistical history. Kubatko estimated that each season had about 100 errors. He could resolve most using online news databases. Kubatko also sought help from his readers, posting on the blog his “most wanted” list for box scores where the sum of players’ scores didn’t equal the team total.The NBA steps inKubatko’s effort to build a publicly accessible archive of the game’s history made slow but sure progress.2In October 2012, Kubatko announced partial box scores were available for the 1982-83 and 1983-84 seasons. In December, Basketball Reference’s database stretched to 1981-82. The next month, he’d added one more year. By March of last year, the database went back to 1976-77, the first year after the NBA merged with the American Basketball Association. Last March, he announced a big breakthrough: The database now went back to 1964-65.Since then, the work has stalled: Basketball Reference has added just one more year. One reason is that Kubatko left Sports Reference in August, citing “creative differences.”3He retains a stake in the company, and is, as of earlier this month, an NBA consultant, through his company, Statitudes LLC.Sports Reference’s founder and president, Sean Forman, says the work to fill in the remaining 18 years of box-score data continues, but it isn’t a priority. That’s because the NBA itself announced in February 2013 that it had posted the box score for every game, all the way back to 1946-47, to NBA.com. “We want to be first on things,” Forman said. “Now that the NBA already has that data up, it’s a little bit less of an impetus.”So where did the NBA get that data? It always had “thorough statistical records,” league spokesman John Acunto said, but hadn’t figured out how to best publish most of them online until partnering with SAP, the tech company that powers the NBA’s revamped stats site. Before the site relaunch last year, the NBA offered game-by-game stats online going back only to 2007, Acunto said.Pfander’s box-score archive was one source the league used to fill gaps. “We have acquired from Pfander and others additional references and sources to cross-reference and validate our information,” Acunto said.Pete Palmer, a veteran sports statistician, said he and Pfander collaborated on using the box-score collection to correct errors in the league’s records. Palmer said that Pfander also sold his box scores to the statisticians at the Elias Sports Bureau.4“As I remember it, some of the box scores were hard to read and Dick had to prepare typed files for Elias,” Palmer said by email.Steve Hirdt, a statistician at often-secretive Elias, declined to comment on whether the company worked with Pfander. “It’s just not something we discuss,” he said by phone.The legend retiresPfander is far from the only amateur completist to aid sports historians. Pollack, of the Sixers, credited regular contributions from other basketball enthusiasts in his book over the years. David W. Smith has led a team of volunteers in the ongoing, ambitious effort to fill the record of every Major League Baseball play. Wrona built an online auto-racing database for a dozen series. Forman cited the contribution of Ed Washuta, who entered minor league baseball stats over a century old. “Pfander is an exemplar in that he has produced such a tremendous set of data for the public,” Forman said.The work of filling and correcting the NBA statistical record goes on. Many of the older box scores contained only field goals made, free throws made and points scored for each player. And some box scores are missing players, such as these on NBA.com. Fans often write to the league to suggest corrections, which it makes when appropriate, Acunto said. Sports Reference similarly invites corrections from readers.Pfander, a user of the site, continued to help Sports Reference’s efforts after shipping his data. “Some of those older scans are really poor,” Kubatko said. “It was very hard to read some of them. He was trying to find replacements for those, and occasionally he would send us stuff that would give us a better scan.” Pfander also did some digitizing work himself, typing old box scores into Microsoft Word documents — Word tables were his instrument of choice for organizing his digital data. “He was committed, definitely,” Kubatko said.5Pfander also sent along his ABA box scores, and inputting those is another project waiting to be completed.The work could go on forever. “You’re never going to get a perfect set of box scores,” Kubatko said. “It’s just not going to happen.”Today, though, Pfander is no longer actively working on NBA statistics. In November 2012 — just as Basketball Reference’s effort to input his data was gaining momentum — Pfander had surgery for a brain aneurysm. Afterward, he was confused, “and he actually made the joke, something about, you should never have brain surgery during NBA season, because it just messes up all the statistics,” his daughter Colleen recalled.Later that month, on his 78th birthday, Pfander suffered a stroke. The stroke has affected his short-term memory, Pfander and his children say. They tell him that the speech he gave at his wife’s memorial service was the best they’ve ever heard, and he laments that there’s no recording for him to listen to and remind him of what he said.The stroke also has interrupted Pfander’s statistical work. He continues to watch the NBA from his current home at a care facility but, he said, “I’ve had some physical setbacks, and I just don’t do it anymore.” He added, “I started a couple of different times, and I guess I’d say I don’t have the interest in making all those copies of box scores and then filling in the blanks so that I can add ’em up and see strings of double-figure scoring and things like that.”His daughter Julaine has cleaned up his computer’s desktop so that it has just two folders, one of them labeled “basketball stats.” She’s also backed up his data onto an external hard drive. It’s all ready for him to dive back in. “He doesn’t seem to want to do that,” she said. “Part of me thinks he worries that if he doesn’t do it exactly right, he might mess something up. He knows he has all this great data out there, and the last thing he would want to do is not do it the way he used to do it.”“It’s so sad now,” Colleen said. “It was such a passion for him, oh my goodness, he could not bear to fall behind. Now the desire to do statistics is just not there.”If he never revisits basketball stats, Pfander’s legacy is secure, and that’s some comfort. “I think he was probably happy that all of this work he had done — because he had really done it for really personal reasons — he was happy that it would be able to reach a larger audience, and that other people would be able to benefit from the work he had done,” Kubatko said.Of his hobby’s role in completing the Basketball Reference database, Pfander said, “It makes me feel that it was useful.” Dick Pfander has spent most of his life collecting and analyzing box scores from every NBA game since the league’s founding. He did most of his work in solitude, by hand, before the age of personal computers. And he did it simply for his own pleasure, surrounded by supportive family members who cared neither about basketball nor statistics, let alone their intersection.Today, his analog hobby is paying digital dividends for stats-obsessed basketball fans. His work has helped fill gaps in the league’s statistical record for both its official website and the leading independent reference site. The project continues — but without Pfander.An all-consuming “job”Pfander started clipping box scores from newspapers as a teenager in Battle Creek, Michigan, in the late 1940s. He did it during high school, after his marriage to Colette Waterman, through jobs as a teacher and with the Defense Department, through the birth of his three children, and through Colette’s death, in 2009.On vacations, Dick and Colette would travel to places where “he thought there might be a newspaper of use to him” in the local library’s archive, his daughter Julaine Eddy said in a telephone interview. “She’d drop him off and go do things around town while he sat in front of the microfiche machine.”Pfander’s children say they and their mother didn’t share his passion for NBA stats, but they didn’t resent it. It was just one way he expressed his love for basketball and for statistics. He also refereed basketball games and compiled the stats for local youth baseball tournaments and swim meets. He didn’t mind that none of his children played basketball or got into stats.Most of all, he sat in front of the television, “going back and forth between watching the basketball and working on the stats,” said his son, Greg. “It never bothered me that he did it — it was his thing. It just seems like that’s my dad, that’s what he always did.”Julaine’s memory of her father working on his stats is vivid. “Dad had this huge desk at home, and it was him sitting at that desk. The TV was visible from that desk, and he sat there and worked,” she said. “And as a kid, you think, ‘That must be a job he’s doing.’”Why did he do it? Pfander, 79, isn’t expansive on the topic. “It was a hobby for me,” he said in an interview last week. “It was a fun thing for me to do.” He considered himself a statistician long before NBA teams started hiring statisticians. “I had always been interested in statistics,” Pfander said, and “I kind of liked doing statistical-type things.”He added, “I don’t think anybody would do all that unless they enjoyed it.” Dick Pfander Courtesy of Colleen Greff read more

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Premier pipes up on crime again

first_img Husband arrested for murder in Long Island, Bahamas Recommended for you Nationwide manhunt launched after shooting victim dies Related Items:crime, premier rufus ewing TCI Police Commissioner says absolute focus is reducing crime, gives some insight into the decreases recorded Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 30 Sept 2015 – Premier Honorable Rufus Ewing says he continues to be disturbed by the mounting violence. The senseless loss of life and especially that of our young people is unsettling and vexatious. The premier said there is a national security council being formed jointly by the Office of the Premier and the Governor’s Office. The media statement came in as police were holding a press conference in regards to reports of a violent stabbing in Five Cays. Up to production time there was no further information on that story.last_img read more

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19 Arrests Made in AntiCrime Operations

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppBahamas, May 17, 2017 – Nassau – Consistent with the Commissioner’s Policing Priorities for 2017, large teams of police officers conducted intensified anti-crime operations in several Policing Divisions across New Providence on Tuesday 16th May 2017.Yesterday’s operations was designed to disrupt crime groups and to target persons involved in criminal activities, such as Drugs and Firearms, Persons wanted for various criminal offences, Prolific Offenders, Persons wanted for Outstanding Court Warrants and motorists operating in Breach of the Traffic Laws.The operations resulted in 19 persons arrested for a number of Criminal offences, and Traffic offences; and outstanding Court WarrantsAdditionally, 254 drivers were cited for various traffic violations.#magneticmedianews#19arrestsmadeinbahamas Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:#19arrestsmadeinbahamas, #magneticmedianewslast_img read more

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Sailors from USS Bonhomme Richard helping out in the community

first_img KUSI Newsroom, Sailors from USS Bonhomme Richard helping out in the community 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – U.S. Navy sailors from the USS Bonhomme Richard, an amphibious assault ship and the third American warship to bear the name, will hold a handful of community relations events throughout the county today to meet with members of the community.The Navy dubbed the day of events “13/13 Day,” representing the ships 13 departments doing 13 different events around the county.More than 1,100 sailors are expected to participate in the event to share their pride in serving on the USS Bonhomme Richard, which arrived in San Diego after spending six years based in Sasebo, Japan, and build a rapport with county residents.Six of the ship’s departments will hold beach cleanup events at Silver Strand, Mission Beach, Presidio Park, Pacific Beach, Coronado Beach and La Jolla Cove.Several departments will also hold cleanup events in Balboa Park and the Chula Vista Veterans Home. Two departments are expected to collaborate with Meals on Wheels and the Boys and Girls Club. Posted: May 15, 2019 Updated: 11:07 AM May 15, 2019 KUSI Newsroom Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter #BHR is taking over San Diego right now!! #RevGators from 13 departments are doing 13 community relations projects across the city at the same time!! Check out some of the photos! pic.twitter.com/or0paHJmBi— USS Bonhomme Richard (@LHD6BHR) May 15, 2019last_img read more

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Teslas Models S and X wont be seeing big changes anytime soon

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