30 years ago, the world’s first cyberattack set the stage for…

first_img Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 By Scott Shackelford, Associate Professor of Business Law and Ethics; Director, Ostrom Workshop Program on Cybersecurity and Internet Governance; Cybersecurity Program Chair, IU-Bloomington, Indiana University. Editor’s Note: This article first published on theconversation.com.Back in November 1988, Robert Tappan Morris, son of the famous cryptographer Robert Morris Sr., was a 20-something graduate student at Cornell who wanted to know how bigthe internet was – that is, how many devices were connected to it. So he wrote a program that would travel from computer to computer and ask each machine to send a signal back to a control server, which would keep count.The program worked well – too well, in fact. Morris had known that if it traveled too fast there might be problems, but the limits he built in weren’t enough to keep the program from clogging up large sections of the internet, both copying itself to new machines and sending those pings back. When he realized what was happening, even his messages warning system administrators about the problem couldn’t get through.His program became the first of a particular type of cyber attack called “distributed denial of service,” in which large numbers of Internet-connected devices, including computers, webcams, and other smart gadgets, are told to send lots of traffic to one particular address, overloading it with so much activity that either the system shuts down or its network connections are completely blocked.As the chair of the integrated Indiana University Cybersecurity Program, I can report that these kinds of attacks are increasingly frequent today. In many ways, Morris’s program, known to history as the “Morris worm,” set the stage for the crucial, and potentially devastating, vulnerabilities in what I and others have called the coming “Internet of Everything.”Unpacking the Morris wormWorms and viruses are similar but different in one key way: A virus needs an external command, from a user or a hacker, to run its program. A worm, by contrast, hits the ground running all on its own. For example, even if you never open your email program, a worm that gets onto your computer might email a copy of itself to everyone in your address book.In an era when few people were concerned about malicious software and nobody had protective software installed, the Morris worm spread quickly. It took 72 hours for researchers at Purdue and Berkeley to halt the worm. In that time, it infected tens of thousands of systems – about 10 percent of the computers then on the internet. Cleaning up the infection cost hundreds or thousands of dollars for each affected machine.In the clamor of media attention about this first event of its kind, confusion was rampant. Some reporters even asked whether people could catch the computer infection. Sadly, many journalists as a whole haven’t gotten much more knowledgeable on the topic in the intervening decades.Robert Tappan Morris, in 2008. Trevor Blackwell/Wikimedia, CC BY-SAMorris wasn’t trying to destroy the internet, but the worm’s widespread effects resulted in him being prosecuted under the then-new Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. He was sentenced to three years of probation and a roughly US$10,000 fine. In the late 1990s, though, he became a dot-com millionaire – and is now a professor at MIT.Rising threatsThe internet remains subject to much more frequent – and more crippling – DDoS attacks. With more than 20 billion devices of all types, from refrigerators and cars to fitness trackers, connected to the internet, and millions more being connected weekly, the number of security flaws and vulnerabilities is exploding.In October 2016, a DDoS attack using thousands of hijacked webcams – often used for security or baby monitors – shut down access to a number of important internet services along the eastern U.S. seaboard. That event was the culmination of a series of increasingly damaging attacks using a botnet, or a network of compromised devices, which was controlled by software called Mirai. Today’s internet is much larger, but not much more secure than the internet of 1988.Some things have actually gotten worse. Figuring out who is behind particular attacks is not as easy as waiting for that person to get worried and send out apology notes and warnings, as Morris did in 1988. In some cases – the ones big enough to merit full investigations – it’s possible to identify the culprits. A trio of college students was ultimately found to have created Mirai to gain advantages when playing the “Minecraft” computer game.Fighting DDoS attacksBut technological tools are not enough, and neither are laws and regulations about online activity – including the law under which Morris was charged. The dozens of state and federal cybercrime statutes on the books have not yet seemed to reduce the overall number or severity of attacks, in part because of the global nature of the problem.There are some efforts underway in Congress to allow attack victims in some cases to engage in active defense measures – a notion that comes with a number of downsides, including the risk of escalation – and to require better security for internet-connected devices. But passage is far from assured.Aircraft problems get thoroughly investigated, resulting in public reports and recommendations for the industry to improve performance and safety. NTSB via APThere is cause for hope, though. In the wake of the Morris worm, Carnegie Mellon University established the world’s first Cyber Emergency Response Team, which has been replicated in the federal government and around the world. Some policymakers are talking about establishing a national cybersecurity safety board, to investigate digital weaknesses and issue recommendations, much as the National Transportation Safety Board does with airplane disasters.More organizations are also taking preventative action, adopting best practices in cybersecurity as they build their systems, rather than waiting for a problem to happen and trying to clean up afterward. If more organizations considered cybersecurity as an important element of corporate social responsibility, they – and their staff, customers and business partners – would be safer.In “3001: The Final Odyssey,” science fiction author Arthur C. Clarke envisioned a future where humanity sealed the worst of its weapons in a vault on the moon – which included room for the most malignant computer viruses ever created. Before the next iteration of the Morris worm or Mirai does untold damage to the modern information society, it is up to everyone – governments, companies and individuals alike – to set up rules and programs that support widespread cybersecurity, without waiting another 30 years. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Please enter your comment! LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your name here Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate TAGStheconversation.com Previous article7 ways to teach civil discourse to studentsNext articleUpdating Breaking News: Wekiva High School lockdown lifted Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR The Anatomy of Fear You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitterlast_img read more

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In case you missed it: The Apopka news week in review

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate 5 stories that shaped Apopka’s news week:OC Commissioner Christine Moore shares her top 5 things she loves about our District 2Join Dr. Anthony Fauci and Rep. Val Demings this monthApopka: You have a ‘right to know’, reminds Orange Co. Clerk of Court during Sunshine WeekUpdating Breaking News: Fatal crash on State Road 44 in Volusia County kills two Apopka womenOC announces vaccine eligibility for ages 40+, online help for mental health, free transportation expanded and more The Anatomy of Fear Please enter your comment! TAGSapopkaICYMIIn Case You Missed ItnewsTop StoriesWeek in Review Previous articleCity of Apopka announces Summer Camps 2021; UF/IFAS Extension Orange Co. 4-H / S.T.E.M. Summer Camp registration now openNext articleApple vs. Samsung SmartPhones: A Comparison for Identifying the Better One Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 center_img Please enter your name here Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter People enjoying beautiful Kelly Park in Apopka You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

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Santander to support National Citizen Service for three years

first_img“Through our new community programme, The Discovery Project, we’ll be working with NCS to help young people build their knowledge and skills with work focused support and training. NCS Action Day is a fantastic way for young people to build on what they learn on the programme and give back to their local communities. We are very pleased to be working with NCS and it’s great to have been able to kick off our partnership at such a fantastic project.”The Discovery Project is Santander’s new flagship community programme that aims to benefit 1 million people in the UK over the next 5 years. The initiative is designed to inspire people to have confidence in the future by giving them the skills, knowledge and support to explore the opportunities today’s fast-changing world has to offer.  169 total views,  3 views today Howard Lake | 7 March 2016 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Santander to support National Citizen Service for three years Santander has pledged to support the National Citizen Service for the next three years. The bank will provide event sponsorship, work experience placements for NCS graduates, and opportunities for its staff to volunteer to share their knowledge and skills.National Citizen Service offers all 16 to 17 year olds across England and Northern Ireland a four-week programme providing participants with skills for work and life and the opportunity to volunteer with a community project that they create.Michael Lynas, CEO, NCS Trust said:“In the past two years, NCS participants have given an incredible eight million hours to improve their communities and NCS Action Day is all about celebrating this. We’re so pleased to be working with Santander as a partner – working together we will be able to support young people to make an even greater impact.”NCS Action DaySantander staff marked NCS Action Day last week by volunteering for a day to help West London charity Only Connect, the criminal justice charity that equips young people with new skills.Santander staff join National Citizen Service participants to volunteer on NCS DayElsewhere over 80 social action projects organised by more than 2,000 teenagers were celebrated on NCS Action Day.Simon Bray, Retail Divisional Managing Director at Santander said: Advertisementcenter_img  170 total views,  4 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis14 Tagged with: corporate Volunteering AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis14last_img read more

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A 34-year-old dad, a professor and young newlyweds among the 20 killed in limo crash

first_imgPeter R. Barber/The Daily Gazette of Schenectady, N.Y.(ALBANY, N.Y.) — A 34-year-old dad, a college professor and young newlyweds were among the 20 killed in a limo crash in upstate New York.Authorities have released the identities of the 20 victims of Sunday’s accident, including the 17 limousine passengers who all died, the driver and two pedestrians.The limousine was carrying the 17 passengers to a birthday party when it crashed into a parked Toyota Highlander in Schoharie, a town about 40 miles away from Albany. The SUV then struck two pedestrians nearby.The two pedestrians who died were identified by New York State Police as 46-year-old Brian Hough of Moravia, New York, and 70-year-old James Schnurr of Kerhonkson, New York.Hough was an assistant professor of geology at the State University of New York in Oswego, his biography shows. Schnurr was Hough’s father-in-law, ABC New York station WABC-TV reported.The limo passengers were identified by New York State Police as:Axel J. Steenburg, 29, and Amy L. Steenburg, 29, of Amsterdam, New YorkThe couple had just married in June, and the group was out celebrating Amy Steenburg’s 30th birthday, WABC-TV reported.Richard M. Steenburg, 34, of Johnstown, New YorkHe leaves behind a 10-year-old daughter and 14-year-old stepson, according to WABC-TV.Allison King, 31, of Ballston Spa, New YorkMary E. Dyson, 33, of Watertown, New YorkRobert J. Dyson, 34, of Watertown, New YorkAbigail M. Jackson, 34, of Amsterdam, New YorkMatthew W. Coons, 27, of Johnstown, New YorkSavannah D. Bursese, 24, of Johnstown, New YorkPatrick K. Cushing, 31, and Amanda D. Halse, 26, of Halfmoon, New YorkCushing and Halse had been dating for about a year, family told ABC News.“She was such a charismatic person and she just wanted to make sure everyone was happy and I’m so grateful that she was my sister out of everyone else on this earth,” Karina Halse said of her sister on “Good Morning America.”Erin R. McGowan, 34, and Shane T. McGowan, 30, of Amsterdam, New YorkThe couple had married earlier this year, family told ABC News.Amanda Rivenburg, 29, of Colonie, New YorkAdam G. Jackson, 34, of Amsterdam, New YorkRachael K. Cavosie, 30, of Waterford, New YorkMichael C. Ukaj, 33, of Johnstown, New YorkThe driver, 53-year-old Scott Lisinicchia of Lake George, New York, did not have the appropriate driver’s license required to drive a vehicle that can hold more than 15 occupants,A law enforcement official told ABC News.Community members held a candlelit vigil Monday night to honor the victims of the crash.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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California marks one year since deadliest wildfire in state history

first_imgToa55/iStock(PARADISE, Calif.) — It was one year ago that flames ignited in a parched, wooded area in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada in Northern California before sunrise. Within days, that wildfire would become the deadliest, most destructive in the state’s history.The so-called Camp Fire spread across 240 square miles over the course of 18 days, decimating communities in its path. Nearly 14,000 homes were destroyed and 85 people died from the catastrophic blaze, mostly in the Butte County town of Paradise.Ceremonies will be held in Paradise and other communities affected by the Camp Fire on Friday to mark the one-year anniversary. There will be 85 seconds of silence to remember the 85 lives lost.The extreme heat of the fast-moving fire, which turned entire neighborhoods into ash, made it difficult for authorities to find the remains of those who died.One person out of the 85 victims is still unidentified, and little is known about the individual, even after a year. The Butte County Sheriff’s Office says it’s a man from Concow, a small mountain hamlet nestled in the woods just east of Paradise.Few of the homes that burned to the ground have been rebuilt in the past year. Many residents remain displaced in nearby communities, while others have moved out of the region.Investigators determined that the blaze was sparked by power lines owned and operated by the Pacific Gas and Electric Co., also known as PG&E. The San Francisco-based utility company filed for bankruptcy in January as it grapples with lawsuits following the Camp Fire and other devastating wildfires that its equipment ignited or likely ignited in recent years.Last month, PG&E preemptively cut power to millions of residents in Northern California as high winds, which contribute to wildfires, moved through the Golden State. The company said in a statement at the time that it turned off power “to protect public safety” as gusty winds and dry conditions bring “a heightened fire risk.”Fed up with the embattled utility company, 22 mayors and other local leaders from across the region have proposed to turn PG&E into a customer-owned cooperative.“There is a better way,” they wrote in a letter to the California Public Utilities Commission on Monday, “and we want you to consider it.” Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Great flights by great snipes: long and fast non-stop migration over benign habitats

first_imgMigratory land birds perform extreme endurance flights when crossing ecological barriers, such as deserts, oceans and ice-caps. When travelling over benign areas, birds are expected to migrate by shorter flight steps, since carrying the heavy fuel loads needed for long non-stop flights comes at considerable cost. Here, we show that great snipes Gallinago media made long and fast nonstop flights (4300-6800 km in 48-96 h), not only over deserts and seas but also over wide areas of suitable habitats, which represents a previously unknown migration strategy among land birds. Furthermore, the great snipes achieved very high ground speeds (15-27 ms(-1)), which was not an effect of strong tailwind support, and we know of no other animal that travels this rapidly over such a long distance. Our results demonstrate that some migratory birds are prepared to accept extreme costs of strenuous exercise and large fuel loads, even when stopover sites are available along the route and there is little tailwind assistance. A strategy of storing a lot of energy before departure, even if migration is over benign habitats, may be advantageous owing to differential conditions of fuel deposition, predation or infection risk along the migration route.last_img read more

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Hybrid lettings agency due to launch later this year to ‘take on’ Purplebricks

first_imgHome » News » Agencies & People » Hybrid lettings agency due to launch later this year to ‘take on’ Purplebricks previous nextAgencies & PeopleHybrid lettings agency due to launch later this year to ‘take on’ PurplebricksAccommocation.co.uk founder Aaron Short claims his more landlord and ‘generation rent’ friendly online model will prevail.Nigel Lewis6th September 201803,022 Views A new hybrid estate agency due to launch later this year has said it expects to succeed in breaking into the private rented sector where other hybrids including Purplebricks have so far failed to make substantial progress.Speaking at last night’s PropTechDen pitching event organised by LiFE Ventures at Google’s start-ups bootcamp in central London, Acccommodation.co.uk founder Aaron Short (pictured, above) said hybrid estate agents had so far not made much headway in the lettings market.He also cited Purplebricks, which he said only listed approximately 4,000 rental properties but had nearly 21,000 sales properties in the UK.“Purplebricks is growing very fast but the rental part of its business doesn’t seem to be moving as quickly as the sales part, which is maybe because lettings is such a long term play,” he said.“The way we will stand out from Purplebricks is to have local accommodation managers recruited from local letting agents, and what they will do is build relationships with our landlords.”Generation rentAaron also said Purplebricks is not appealing to ‘generation rent’ and that his new platform will do so with its more ‘whole process’ tech approach and app, he claims.Accommodation.co.uk was started up last year and at launch will have spent 18 months getting ready to go to market. It is due to launch officially during the final three months of this year, although its website is already live.It offers landlords an online property and tenant management suite, while renters get a mobile phone app and welcome pack. But it will advertise its properties traditionally via Zoopla, OTM, Rightmove and SpareRoom.The company says it is also due to offer accommodation through its own property portal in 51 cities across the UK.hybrid lettings agent Purplebricks Aaron Short accommodation.co.uk September 6, 2018Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

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Spate of petty thefts at St Hugh’s

first_imgA series of pidge thefts at St Hugh’s has put students and staff on alert over the past week. Multiple instances have seen items being stolen from pidges and people’s belongings going missing in college.Venkat Kondragunta, the college’s JCR President, told Cherwell, “There has been a small increase in the past few weeks of informal, word-of-mouth complaints about students’ personal belongings going missing in college. This is obviously unacceptable if it turns out to be more than just ‘they used some of my milk for a cup of tea’.“We have set up a formal procedure of reporting such incidences in the hope of gauging the extent of the issue.” Kondragunta added that the JCR is currently liaising with college staff to prevent further thefts.The Swan, the St Hugh’s JCR newspaper, has run an announcement informing students of the procedure for reporting thefts.In a statement to Cherwell, a spokesperson for St Hugh’s said, “As a community we take any report of theft seriously, and the College, JCR and MCR work closely together to investigate and resolve any such reports.”Theodora Bradbury, a student at St Hugh’s, stated, “The general feeling in the JCR is disgruntlement; we have had quite a bit of food theft as well recently so people are a bit upset.“That said,” she continued, “as the Vice President said that only one person has officially reported a theft to her so far, and between the lack of reporting and difficulty of knowing whether something’s been taken from your pidge or just got lost in the post, it’s uncertain as to whether we can really take useful action to deal with the issue.”St Hugh’s has previously experienced some petty theft. Large amounts of food were stolen from the residence’s kitchens in Michaelmas, term which led to intervention from the college.last_img read more

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News story: Inside the Foreign Office: BBC series 2018

Brexit information on GOV.UK Nigeria and the UK Mongolia and the UK Exporting is GREAT Karen Pierce – Holding Russia to account at the United Nations Ben Merrick: dealing with Mother Nature’s destruction after Hurricane IrmaFind out more about the work of the Foreign Office that features in episode 3: Dan Chugg – Posted to Burma: a country on the edgeFind out more about Foreign Office work that features in episode 1: Three of our ambassadors in the first episode have published articles on the FCO Blog to provide an update on their roles: Our worldwide Travel Advice Two of our diplomats who feature in this episode have published articles on the FCO Blog to give a more in-depth look at what we do around the world. Forced marriage support and guidance How the UK government responded to Hurricanes Irma and Maria Catch up on Brave new world on the BBC iPlayer. Our Mission to the United Nations in New York Russia and the UK Ukraine and the UK Burma and the UK Permanent Under-Secretary Sir Simon McDonald on Twitter Catherine Arnold – Mongolia: small embassies can have a big impact The Foreign Office cat Palmerston also appears in this episode.Episode 1: Keeping power and influence Sophie Lott: how the Forced Marriage Unit saves lives Consular Affairs Director Julia Longbottom talk about how we help UK citizens abroad:Consular servicesEpisode 2: Brave new world Forced Marriage Unit caseworker Sophie Lott and our Overseas Territories Director Ben Merrick have published articles on the FCO Blog to provide an update following this episode. working for the Foreign OfficeFind out more about working for the Foreign & Commonwealth OfficeSocial media view the Open University’s Inside the Foreign Office resources explore inside the Foreign Office with our interactive virtual tour of our iconic headquarters in London and fascinating embassies and residences around the world read the FCO Blog with contributions from our staff around the world Judith Gough – Frontline diplomacy: our woman in Ukraine More about the Foreign Office Catch up on Keeping power and influence on the BBC iPlayer. BBC Television has made a 3-part documentary series about the Foreign & Commonwealth Office. The BBC filmed our staff in London and around the world from summer 2017 to summer 2018, following our work to protect British people, and promote UK prosperity and influence overseas.This page provides links to find out more about the themes and the people featured in the series. You can follow the conversation on Twitter through #InsideTheForeignOffice.Episode 3: Brits in trouble Catch up on Brits in trouble on the BBC iPlayer. Laure Beaufils – Colourful, vibrant, booming Lagos: UK trade with NigeriaFind out more about the work of the Foreign Office that features in episode 2: follow the hashtag #InsideTheForeignOffice follow us on: Twitter Facebook Instagram read more

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Jon Fishman To Appear On Episode Of ‘Maine Cabin Masters’

first_imgJon Fishman has been a true asset to his community since he moved back to Maine a few years ago. In addition to serving on the Lincolnville Board of Selectment, the Phish drummer has also renovated and reopened one of the town’s historic general stores and continues to host a show called The Errant Path on a local community radio station.Now it looks like Fishman will get the chance to represent his town on national television when he and his wife, Briar Fishman, are featured on the DIY Network program Maine Cabin Masters. The pair appeared in a preview for the upcoming episode which was posted via the show’s Instagram. Their forthcoming episode will premiere 10 p.m. ET on Monday, March 19th.Maine Cabin Masters is hosted by Chase Morell, who restores old cabins across the state for the program. According to JamBase, Morell’s teammate Ryan Eldridge and Jedi Baker are fans of Phish and have worn Phish shirts on the show on various occassions.You can check out the preview of next week’s episode below. Evidently, Fishman’s home is in need of some repairs and his property suffered some damage during a recent wind storm. As previously reported, Jon Fishman will join Maine band The Mallet Brothers when they embark on a tour in April. You can take a look at a full list of their upcoming dates with the Phish drummer here.[H/T – JamBase]last_img read more

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