Tony Becca: Trinidad and Tobago all the way

first_img THREE VICTORIES It is true that Jamaica recorded three victories, but two of those victories, thanks to the leg-spinners of Jacobs, and a maiden century from McCarthy, came when they dismissed the weak ICC Americas for 76 runs in the first match before narrowly squeezing home in the second match in the last over and by one wicket. The standard of the tournament was best defined by the difference of the batting of Darren Bravo and the rest, including Guyana’s feeble offering when they crawled to 42 for three after 20 overs against Trinidad and Tobago in one semi-final, the Windward Islands 175 against Barbados in the other semi-final, and the batting of Barbados in the final. It was as if the batsmen of Barbados Pride, all of them and every one of them, were playing against a turning ball for the first time in their lives. DISAPPOINTING BATTING Against this, none of the other teams looked good in a tournament during which the batting was disappointing, the bowling was embarrassingly wayward, and the fielding was atrocious. The batting, with the exception of Darren Bravo, was poor, with the likes of the since-retired Shivnarine Chanderpaul, Kraigg Brathwaite, John Campbell, Assad Fudadin, Nkrumah Bonner, Shai Hope, AndrÈ McCarthy, Chadwick Walton, and Carlos Brathwaite of Australia fame getting only one good score in six or seven innings each. Bravo was good, stroking 82, 95, and 97 for 274 runs in three innings at a good clip of average of 91.33. That was a far cry from the 259 runs in seven innings for an average of 51.80 by Fudadin in second place and from the 251 at 41.83 in third place by McCarthy. In fact, after a tournament of eight teams playing in two groups of return matches and before empty stands but for one semi-final and the final, with the top two teams in each group meeting in the semi-finals and final, only seven teams scored more than 200 runs in a match, only three batsmen scored more than 100 runs in an innings, only two batsmen averaged over 50, and regardless of the state of the pitches, that was bad, especially with the low standard of fielding throughout. It was even worse when one considered the standard of the bowling. Only one bowler, pacer Delorn Johnson of the Windward Islands, took six wickets in an innings, and despite the poor bowling and ragged fielding, only three bowlers, including Jamaica’s Damion Jacobs, took five wickets in an innings. In fact, only Richards, Johnson, Emrit, Jaggesar, and Hosein impressed as bowlers, or looked promising as bowlers. While the tournament was a success for the Red Force, the one-eyed man in a blind man’s games, it was poor for the other teams, and particularly so for Guyana and for Jamaica, who went into it with much hope. With Trinidad and Tobago playing like champions throughout, especially in the semi-finals and final, knocking off Guyana by 54 runs after posting 259 for 9 and limiting the Guyana to 205 after the Jaguars were reeling at 42 for three after 20 overs, and Barbados by 72 after dashing to 270 for seven and brushing the Pride aside for 198 after the ninth wicket had fallen at 149 with 15.4 overs to go. Jamaica’s feeble attempt included a winning 139 for 8 against Barbados, a losing 139 against Trinidad and Tobago, a losing 176 versus Trinidad and Tobago, and a losing 173 against Barbados. The Trinidad and Tobago Red Force, short of some of their better players, by birth, including Dwayne Bravo, Kieron Pollard, Sunil Narine, Lendl Simmons, and Samuel Badree, walked away with the Nagico Super50 Trophy a week ago, and easily and comprehensively at that. Led by batsmen Darren Bravo and Denesh Ramdin towards the end, left-handed opening batsman Ervin Lewis, who dazzled for a while, all-rounder Narsingh Deonarine, and medium-pacer Rayad Emrit, as well as opening batsman Kyle Ottley, pacer Marlon Richards, off-spinner John Russ Jaggesar, and left-arm spinner Akeal Hosein, Trinidad and Tobago were in control from start to finish. Considered not good enough to win the tournament at the start, the team began well, playing confidently and attractively before they were joined by their two big guns. From there on, there was no doubt, or hardly any doubt, as to who the winners would be. The Red Force of Trinidad and Tobago rolled past the toothless Guyana Jaguars in the semi-finals by 54 runs, and past the humiliated Barbados Pride by 72 in the final. In losing one match, to Barbados, when it did not matter, Trinidad and Tobago Red Force were streets and lanes above the others. Barbados, Guyana, the Windward Islands, and Jamaica were no match for the Red Force, and much better than the International Cricket Council (ICC) Americas, who failed to win a game, and the Leeward Islands, who won one. Trinidad and Tobago’s Lewis, who cracked 74 off 74 deliveries and 102 not out off 100 deliveries against Jamaica, and Kyle Hope and Kjorn Ottley looked good at the start, Richards bowled well, Emrit also bowled well, and Jaggesar, Deonarine, and Hosein all bowled well – all three spin bowlers mixing good line, good length, and teasing flight to stifle the opposing batsmen.last_img read more

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Pacquiao easily makes weight, Horn ‘feeling better’

first_imgManny Pacquiao, center, weighs in, Tuesday, July 1, 2017, in Brisbane, Australia. Pacquiao, is putting his WBO welterweight world title on the line Sunday, July 2, against the 29-year-old Australian Jeff Horn. (AP Photo/John Pye)BRISBANE, Australia—Manny Pacquiao didn’t even bother to remove his socks and inhale when he stepped into the weigh scale on Saturday. He knew he’ll make it in a breeze.When it was Jeff Horn’s turn, however, the Australian challenger approached it with caution and took a deep breath before boarding, not daring to look at what it registered.ADVERTISEMENT Pagasa: Kammuri now a typhoon, may enter PAR by weekend Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Other than that, the weigh-in for the “Battle of Brisbane” proceeded smoothly as all 14 boxers, including Filipinos Jerwin Ancajas and Joven Dapidran, made the cutoff weights on their first attempts.READ: Weighing game: Horn still over 7 pounds overweight for battleFact is, Pacquiao had the luxury of having a little breakfast at his suite before proceeding to the venue.“Everything’s well, it’s a good weight,” said Roach as Pacquiao missed his desired weight by half a pound.In contrast, Horn came too close to being over, said Roach, who saw Horn immediately eat a banana and gulp down fruit juice after his weight was announced.ADVERTISEMENT READ: Jeff Horn starving, still overweightHorn had to starve himself, taking only sips of water Thursday and little salad Friday night to shed 7.8 pounds and make weight.“It’s never easy to cut that many kilos, but I’m feeling a lot better now, putting fluids back in,” said Horn in the podium interview.According to trainer Glenn Rushton, he was certain that Horn will be able to hurdle the scales.READ: Pacquiao’s title on the line vs Horn in ‘Battle of Brisbane’ “He has never failed to make weight. Never,” said Rushton, who bared that Horn will slowly rehydrate and will climb the ring Sunday between 71 to 72 kilos (156 to 158) pounds.Rushton said there was no secret reducing formula, it so happened that Horn perspires profusely. So after doing his gym routines on sweat suits and having a hot bath, Horn was ready to go early Saturday.While Horn was having a crash diet on fight week, Pacquiao was having an eating binge. Wolfing down three full meals everyday so as not to appear emaciated during his face-off with Horn.READ: Relaxed and restingAs it turned out, it was Horn who looked haggard and pale, though not exactly physically drained. What ‘missteps’? Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ LOOK: Jane De Leon meets fellow ‘Darna’ Marian Rivera LATEST STORIES Pacquiao, on the other hand, appeared vibrant and fresh as he threw away the short, T-shirt, jogging pants and jacket he was wearing at the podium.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games View comments Creamline survives Adamson in PVL Open Conference opener Pacquiao checked in under at 146 pounds, while Horn, after an anxious second as the pin swayed back and forth, posted 147, the welterweight limit.READ: Pacquiao, Horn make weight for fight FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsHorn’s supporters, who dominated the crowd of a few hundred crammed at a function room of Suncorp Stadium, shouted “Hornet! Hornet! Hornet!” which is the challenger’s moniker.Not to be outdone, Pacquiao’s entourage countered “Manny! Manny! Manny!” China furious as Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong Cayetano to unmask people behind ‘smear campaign’ vs him, SEA Games MOST READ Another vape smoker nabbed in Lucenalast_img read more

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Heartbreak for Sitwala, loses to Russell in final

first_imgIndian billiards player Dhruv Sitwala’s hopes of winning his maiden World Professional title came crashing down today after he lost his summit clash to nine-time champion Mike Russell of Qatar at the Northern Snooker Centre here.Sitwala, who made a surprise entry into the final by defeating two compatriots — last year’s winner Pankaj Advani in quarters and Geet Sethi by one point in semifinal, played well throughout the final and constructed four century breaks against nine-time professional champion, including one accounting for 281. However, the Indian lost 1204-1738.On the other hand, green baize veteran Russell finally got back his crown which he lost last year to Advani, who had become the second Indian after Sethi to win the elusive title.Sitwala, the 2007 IBSF World Billiards runner-up, played confidently and with consistency against his much fancied rival and scored breaks of 65, 107, 122, 97, 103, 90, 281 in his 45 visits to the table.Russell, gunning for his 10th Pro title, came out with five century breaks against Sitwala, including one accounting for 450.Russell’s prolific break building and his ability to uncork big breaks were on display once again in the final against the Mumbaikar, who showed great promise and fluency in his shot selections during the five-day-long tournament.In the five-hour final of the Time format, Russell cracked breaks of 198, 115, 174 and 92 in the first session while in the second, he came out with breaks of 450, 95, 184 and 94.Sitwala, on the other, managed to score 65, 107, 122 and 97 in the first session and 103, 90 and 281 in the second half of the game.Russell had won with authoritative dominance against England’s David Causier in the semifinal, recording breaks of 109, 305, 295, 101 and 371 while Sitwala edged past Sethi, winning by a solitary point.Sitwala had lost his first match of the championship to compatriot Ashok Shandilya but managed to win all other group matches.Russell, on the other, continued his form from two amateur world titles he won two months back and won his 10th professional title. He lost one match in league stage against England’s Robert Marshall.advertisementWith PTI inputslast_img read more

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