Children of Tomorrow

first_imgA welfare center located on Disco Hill, Margibi County has been doing its very best to house over 75 Ebola orphans ranging from four to 18 years of age in the past couple of months.Quite recently our paper was able to grace its quarters to see some of the children who are housed at the orphanage which has the capacity of accommodating up to 100 children.-Our mission is to destroy the works of the Devil. We endeavor to redeem those he has attacked and is determined to destroy- Bro. Wilmot B. Yalartai.Touring through two large housing quarters, one being where the children live and another mainly for educational and church purposes, the center is well constructed.“The center’s construction began on November 18, 2010 and was completed in October 2013. It is a collaborative project by Creflo Dollar Ministries and the Abundant life Chapel. The entire facility was named after Pastor Taffi Dollar, the wife of Dr. Creflo Dollar for their dream, sacrifice and wonderful gift that will transform the lives of these children,” added Wilhelmina Yalartai, a caretaker at the facility.According to Wilhelmina, the center only focuses on children who were orphaned by Ebola and so far there are up to 10 survivors as well living there.“We intend to keep these children until they graduate from college mainly because they don’t have anyone to hand them over to. We are all they have and will do our best to protect these children,” she added.Children of all sizes, bearing their own tale of how Ebola riddled their lives, spend their days at TDCWC under monitoring, protection and care.According to care workers at the facility, the center endeavors to provide encouragement for orphans, the poor, less fortunate and abandoned children. The center’s prime focus is religion and preparing the children for their future through its enabling environment.“Our facility expresses the love of God for them in their various situations,” the facility workers shared.While watching three teenagers who appeared to be very close, our paper was told that the children lost 16 of their relatives and are the only members remaining.Nehemiah Dumbai,15, Bendu Dumbai,13 and their brother Amos Dumbai 12 each shared a similar story of how they ended up at the center.“We lost everyone and have been here together since November. Though we don’t have anyone, the center takes care of us and we are happy to be here considering what has happened in our lives,” stated Nehemiah.Bendu who says she survived Ebola after contracting it along with 16 of her relatives who all passed away feels happy about being alive.“I love my brothers and I’m happy to be here with them together as a family,” she smiled.Meanwhile, the center is in need of many things including food, computers, books, toys and above all security, an important need for the facility.“Right now we have not fenced the place and anyone can come into our quarters at any time. We also have a computer room but no computers are available as of yet and we need them urgently to teach the children,” added Wilhelmina.Also, each child that is housed at the center needs sponsorship, according to the staff.  Sponsorship per child is $60.00 United States dollars.“We have two dormitories for the children, kitchen and dining room, chapel, laundry room, running water, school, medical facility, three meals a day, DSTV/cable and space that we would like to use to construct a playground for them. Sponsorship will enable us to continue taking care of these children without any flaws or lack of anything. So far we have been given food twice by WFP, but they have not promised to support us so we are depending on the media to get the news out that we are here with these children who need us,” added WilhelminaShare this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Costly payout for LAFD

first_imgAsked whether the city had attempted to settle, he said, “We engaged in settlement discussions prior to trial, but the parties were too far apart.” The award is less than the $2.7 million payout recommended by the City Attorney’s Office for former Firefighter Tennie Pierce, an African-American who filed a discrimination suit after dog food was slipped into his dinner in what colleagues said was a prank. The City Council approved the settlement, which sparked public outrage and focused attention on horseplay and practical jokes in the 3,500-member department. The settlement was later vetoed by Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, and the case now could head to trial. Kitson’s co-counsel, Genie Harrison, represents Pierce and several other Los Angeles firefighters with discrimination cases against the city. The steady drumbeat of scandals, preceded by a scathing audit from City Controller Laura Chick that found inconsistent discipline, discrimination and a desire by some to downplay offenses, prompted LAFD Chief William Bamattre to retire Jan. 1. Interim Chief Douglas Barry has vowed to clean house. “This verdict underscores what my audit of the Fire Department found last year,” Chick said in a statement. “It is my hope that with new leadership in the city and the department, we are truly moving forward to end the culture of discrimination, harassment and hazing.” Among the allegations, Bressler said he was treated “like a rookie” and berated and yelled at, according to a court filing. He also alleged Battalion Chief Roderick Garcia threatened him in 2004 with “one year of misery” if he pursued his harassment complaints. When higher-ups began asking about rumors of problems at the station, Garcia told them the captains there – the very people being accused – would conduct their own investigation, according to court documents. LAFD spokesman Antoine McKnight declined to comment on the jury award, but said, “Our focus is to continue to make sure we treat all our employees with our core values, and with dignity and respect, and to ensure a workplace that’s free and clear of any type of discrimination or harassment.” Kitson said the jury clearly held the city and the LAFD responsible. eugene.tong@dailynews.com (818) 546-3304160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Bressler also said in the 2005 lawsuit that he was discriminated against because of his age and because he is a Jehovah’s Witness. A third plaintiff, Capt. Gary Mellinger, who also alleged age discrimination, settled with the city for $350,000 last year. Bressler’s attorney, Robert Kitson, said his client was “very gratified” when the jury delivered the verdict to end the two-week trial. “He gave 26 years to the Los Angeles Fire Department, and the campaign of unlawful actions that ended up forcing him out is egregious,” Kitson said. “When he brought them an important message how a subordinate was being treated, they decided it was a message they didn’t want to hear and got rid of the messenger.” Nick Velasquez, spokesman for City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo, said his office was disappointed in the verdict. “We’re reviewing the trial records and are considering our options,” he said. In yet another black eye for the city Fire Department, a veteran Los Angeles firefighter who said he was forced to retire for blowing the whistle on harassment of a colleague won a $1.73 million jury award Friday in a retaliation and age-discrimination case against the department. The verdict for Lewis Steven Bressler comes as the embattled Los Angeles Fire Department confronts a series of lawsuits and complaints that allege the department hasn’t done enough to stamp out unprofessional – and sometimes offensive – behavior. Bressler, 68, said he was given poor reviews by his superiors and placed in a hostile work environment at Fire Station 96 in Chatsworth in retaliation for reporting mistreatment of Firefighter Brenda Lee. An African-American lesbian, Lee said she was harassed by her superiors – who put her through grueling drills without proper safety precautions and made derogatory comments – because of her race and sexual orientation. She has a pending discrimination case against the city. last_img read more

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