Great Googie checking out the view of and from Seattles Space Needle

first_img Google Maps for Android Gander at the Googie goodness of Seattle’s Space Needle Related on CNET 0 Share your voice The view from the Tokyo Skytree, one of the tallest structures on Earth 148 floors in the sky: The view from the Burj Khalifa A tour of the Petronas Towers of Kuala Lumpur Cold War destroyer: Inside the USS Turner Joy Sleeper to Seattle: 39 hours on Amtrak’s Coast Starlight Culture That design, though. Like many once-modern designs, Googie became dated before it became retro, so precious few of these buildings still exist. Los Angeles still has a bunch, an important part of the city’s relatively short architectural history. The New York’s World’s Fair from two years later had most of its buildings removed, and some still exist. Of those still in Queens several are rotting away. The Tomorrowlands at the American Disney parks still have some Googie-inspired buildings, but the newer parks generally don’t. Here in Seattle, the Needle is in a sort of Googie oasis. The towering glass-and-steel skyscrapers are farther south, at a respectable distance, allowing the Space Needle to still have incredible views and not seem tiny compared to modern engineering. I buy my ticket and head up. Clouds on the horizon mean we’ll miss the moment of sunset, but the view is fantastic regardless. There’s not much to explore on the observation deck, it’s not that big. The original idea was for a floating restaurant, and in terms of size that’s basically what this feels like, a big restaurant. Outside there are high glass walls, with tilted glass benches that let you lean back if your vertigo allows. 40 Photos “Googie.” It’s not a misprint, it’s an architectural style.You might not know the name, but you’ll probably recognize it. A subset of Mid-century modern architecture, you’ve seen it in such movies as The Incredibles and TV shows like The Jetsons. Googie is rocket-inspired geometric designs featuring atoms, UFOs, boomerangs and anything with an intrinsic sense of motion. Perhaps the most recognizable example is the unofficial symbol of the city of Seattle: The Space Needle.Built for the Seattle World’s Fair in 1962, the 605-foot (184-meter) tower was built to withstand earthquakes greater than 9.0 and category-5 hurricane winds. It has been visited by over 63 million people, including me. Here’s a look inside, and the excellent views from the observation deck. Review • The rebuilt Google Maps for Android is better than ever Seattle stunner For some reason, I decided to walk. I’d just arrived via ferry after photographing the USS Turner Joy on the other side of Puget Sound. It didn’t seem that far on Google Maps, but of course, Google Maps doesn’t (yet) tell you that there are hills. When I finally arrived at the tower its size dominated the views. Briefly the tallest building west of the Mississippi, it is far shorter than more modern towers, like the Tokyo Skytree. Post a comment If you head down the wood- and glass-lined “Oculus” staircase, you get to the lower level. Here, in addition to the restaurant, is a heavily reinforced glass floor that will also rotate. I leave as the tower closes for the night. The next day I head back, taking the monorail that was also built for the World’s Fair. It, too, is an anachronism of another age. The cars are original, but are in good shape. The daytime view is perhaps not quite as epic as the night, but still impressive. Three Tiny Planets from the observation deck of the Space Needle. From my Instagram. Geoffrey Morrison/CNET I check my map, and extrapolate from a few Instagram photos, where on the nearby hill I’d have to head to get a good view of the Needle and the city behind. Kerry Park seems easiest, and closest to a bus line. No way I’m walking up there. The view doesn’t disappoint. I return a few hours later, after dinner with a high school friend I haven’t seen in 20 years. This trip was a pretty good idea. The Space Needle lit at night is simply gorgeous. Spacebound space-needle-28-of-40 Geoffrey Morrison/CNET As one of the most visited attractions on the West Coast, you don’t need me to tell you it’s a great spot. You can buy your tickets ahead of time, which is a bit of a gamble. Seattle is notorious for its cloud cover and regular drizzle, but on the other hand in the summer I can imagine the best times sell out. I’ll leave that decision up to you. If you can, arrive about an hour before sunset, then stay to see the lights of the city at night. The Space Needle’s height may no longer be impressive, but the whole point of a tower like this is for a good view, and you can still get that, not to mention the great view looking at it on the ground. To see how it looks up close, and the excellent views from the observation deck, check out the gallery above.As well as covering TV and other display tech, Geoff does photo tours of cool museums and locations around the world including nuclear submarines, massive aircraft carriers, medieval castles, airplane graveyards and more.  You can follow his exploits on Instagram, Twitter, and on his travel blog BaldNomad. He also wrote a bestselling sci-fi novel.  Tagslast_img read more

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Physicists set new record with 10qubit entanglement

first_img More information: Chao Song et al. “10-Qubit Entanglement and Parallel Logic Operations with a Superconducting Circuit.” Physical Review Letters. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.119.180511Also at arXiv:1703.10302 [quant-ph] False-color circuit image showing 10 superconducting qubits (star shapes) interconnected by a central bus resonator B (gray). Credit: Song et al. ©2017 American Physical Society This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2017 Phys.org (Phys.org)—Physicists have experimentally demonstrated quantum entanglement with 10 qubits on a superconducting circuit, surpassing the previous record of nine entangled superconducting qubits. The 10-qubit state is the largest multiqubit entangled state created in any solid-state system and represents a step toward realizing large-scale quantum computing. Citation: Physicists set new record with 10-qubit entanglement (2017, November 29) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-11-physicists-qubit-entanglement.htmlcenter_img Journal information: Physical Review Letters Quantum computing on the move Lead researcher Jian-Wei Pan and co-workers at the University of Science and Technology of China, Zhejiang University, Fuzhou University, and the Institute of Physics, China, have published a paper on their results in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters.In general, one of the biggest challenges to scaling up multiqubit entanglement is addressing the catastrophic effects of decoherence. One strategy is to use superconducting circuits, which operate at very cold temperatures and consequently have longer qubit coherence times. In the new set-up, the researchers used qubits made of tiny pieces of aluminum, which they connected to each other and arranged in a circle around a central bus resonator. The bus is a key component of the system, as it controls the interactions between qubits, and these interactions generate the entanglement. As the researchers demonstrated, the bus can create entanglement between any two qubits, can produce multiple entangled pairs, or can entangle up to all 10 qubits. Unlike some previous demonstrations, the entanglement does not require a series of quantum logic gates, nor does it involve modifying the physical wiring of the circuit, but instead all 10 qubits can be entangled with a single collective qubit-bus interaction.To measure how well the qubits are entangled, the researchers used quantum tomography to determine the probability of measuring every possible state of the system. Although there are thousands of such states, the resulting probability distribution yielded the correct state about 67% of the time. This fidelity is well above the threshold for genuine multipartite entanglement (generally considered to be about 50%).In the future, the physicists’ goal is to develop a quantum simulator that could simulate the behavior of small molecules and other quantum systems, which would allow for a more efficient analysis of these systems compared to what is possible with classical computers. Explore furtherlast_img read more

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