Court: Shackled inmate’s exercise was cruel punishment

first_imgA federal appeals court has reinstated a verdict that found Connecticut’s Department of Correction violated the Constitutional rights of an inmate by forcing him to wear full shackles during outside exercise periods. The court upheld Wednesday a jury’s decision that convicted killer Michael Edwards was subjected to cruel and unusual punishment by the department and then-warden Angel Quiros while at the maximum-security Northern Correctional Institution between September 2010 and March 2011. The ruling Wednesday found that inmates have a right to exercise outside their cells. The state Attorney General’s office said it is reviewing the decision and deciding next steps. Quiros is now acting commissioner of the Department of Correction.last_img

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Fr. Jenkins completes COVID-19 isolation period

first_imgUniversity President Fr. John Jenkins has completed his medically recommended isolation period after contracting the coronavirus, Paul Browne, the office of public affairs and communications vice president, said in a press release Monday evening.Jenkins began his isolation period two weeks ago on Sept. 28. He initially entered quarantine of his own volition after receiving criticism over his actions at the Rose Garden nomination ceremony of Notre Dame law professor Judge Amy Coney Barret Sept. 26.Jenkins tested positive for COVID-19 sometime between Sept. 28 and Oct. 2, when his positive result was announced to students, faculty and staff.Browne said Jenkins learned earlier that week a colleague who he regularly associates with tested positive for the virus. Jenkins was then tested and received a positive result. As a result, he entered an extended period of isolation.“Since testing positive for COVID-19, Father Jenkins has experienced moderate symptoms that have lessened over time,” Browne said in a statement to The Observer on Thursday. “He has worked remotely throughout. Father Jenkins is grateful for the expressions of concern and good wishes of many.”According to Monday’s press release, Jenkins is currently symptom-free and “looks forward to resuming his normal activities.”“Father Jenkins again thanked the many people who offered prayers and well wishes for him over the last two weeks,” Browne said.Tags: COVID-19, fr. jenkins, quarantine, University President Father John Jenkinslast_img read more

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Dividends vs deficits: UK regulator wants DB shortfalls addressed

first_imgThe UK’s Pensions Regulator (TPR) has put pressure on dividend-paying companies to ensure a balance between cash paid to shareholders and contributions to pension schemes, according to Willis Towers Watson.TPR yesterday issued its annual report on defined benefit (DB) pension scheme funding. In it, the regulator said it expected schemes “where an employer’s total distribution to shareholders is higher than deficit reduction contributions being paid to the pension scheme to have a relatively short recovery period”.The regulator did not give specific details of what would constitute a “short” period, but Graham McLean, head of pension scheme funding at Willis Towers Watson, said it was clear TPR wanted some companies to pay “a lot more” into their schemes.“Last year, the regulator said that the median FTSE 350 employer was paying 10 times as much in dividends as in pension deficit payments,” McLean said. “A one-to-one ratio would often be a huge change – though, for some employers, a smaller increase in deficit payments might make the recovery period short enough to get the regulator off their back.” TPR was criticised last year by politicians on the cross-party Work and Pensions Committee, who highlighted a 23-year recovery period for the BHS Pension Scheme as unacceptably long.TPR chief executive Lesley Titcomb emphasised to the committee that this was an outlier, with the average recovery period across UK schemes closer to eight years.Willis Towers Watson’s McLean said the regulator could have turned the spotlight on the balance between dividends and DB contributions as “plans to repair deficits are generally not on course”.“Previously, the regulator has been warned that demanding more money for the pension scheme would stop employers from investing in their businesses,” McLean said.“It is trying to reframe the debate from ‘pay off the pension deficit instead of investing in the business’ to ‘pay off the pension deficit instead of returning funds to shareholders’,” he added. ”It makes sense for trustees to look at contributions alongside cash leaving the business, but a dramatic change in dividend policy could raise an employer’s cost of capital and weaken its business.“While the regulator’s words can affect behaviour, they do not change the law. Some employers may stand their ground or make the case that this sort of increase in contributions is not appropriate in their circumstances. Others may put more energy into debating how the deficit gets measured in the first place.”Lynda Whitney, partner at Aon Hewitt, said the regulator’s stance was a warning “with the threat that TPR will take more action than in the past if they do not think there is a fair balance between the treatment of the legal obligation to the scheme compared to shareholders”.TPR has a difficult balance to strike. Research from the International Longevity Centre published last year claimed that deficit reduction contributions had taken almost £100 (€117) away from individual employees’ wage growth.Separate work by JLT Employee Benefits in January reported that the cost of DB benefits was proving a drag on employer payments to defined contribution schemes.last_img read more

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