Tony Becca: Trinidad and Tobago all the way

first_img THREE VICTORIES It is true that Jamaica recorded three victories, but two of those victories, thanks to the leg-spinners of Jacobs, and a maiden century from McCarthy, came when they dismissed the weak ICC Americas for 76 runs in the first match before narrowly squeezing home in the second match in the last over and by one wicket. The standard of the tournament was best defined by the difference of the batting of Darren Bravo and the rest, including Guyana’s feeble offering when they crawled to 42 for three after 20 overs against Trinidad and Tobago in one semi-final, the Windward Islands 175 against Barbados in the other semi-final, and the batting of Barbados in the final. It was as if the batsmen of Barbados Pride, all of them and every one of them, were playing against a turning ball for the first time in their lives. DISAPPOINTING BATTING Against this, none of the other teams looked good in a tournament during which the batting was disappointing, the bowling was embarrassingly wayward, and the fielding was atrocious. The batting, with the exception of Darren Bravo, was poor, with the likes of the since-retired Shivnarine Chanderpaul, Kraigg Brathwaite, John Campbell, Assad Fudadin, Nkrumah Bonner, Shai Hope, AndrÈ McCarthy, Chadwick Walton, and Carlos Brathwaite of Australia fame getting only one good score in six or seven innings each. Bravo was good, stroking 82, 95, and 97 for 274 runs in three innings at a good clip of average of 91.33. That was a far cry from the 259 runs in seven innings for an average of 51.80 by Fudadin in second place and from the 251 at 41.83 in third place by McCarthy. In fact, after a tournament of eight teams playing in two groups of return matches and before empty stands but for one semi-final and the final, with the top two teams in each group meeting in the semi-finals and final, only seven teams scored more than 200 runs in a match, only three batsmen scored more than 100 runs in an innings, only two batsmen averaged over 50, and regardless of the state of the pitches, that was bad, especially with the low standard of fielding throughout. It was even worse when one considered the standard of the bowling. Only one bowler, pacer Delorn Johnson of the Windward Islands, took six wickets in an innings, and despite the poor bowling and ragged fielding, only three bowlers, including Jamaica’s Damion Jacobs, took five wickets in an innings. In fact, only Richards, Johnson, Emrit, Jaggesar, and Hosein impressed as bowlers, or looked promising as bowlers. While the tournament was a success for the Red Force, the one-eyed man in a blind man’s games, it was poor for the other teams, and particularly so for Guyana and for Jamaica, who went into it with much hope. With Trinidad and Tobago playing like champions throughout, especially in the semi-finals and final, knocking off Guyana by 54 runs after posting 259 for 9 and limiting the Guyana to 205 after the Jaguars were reeling at 42 for three after 20 overs, and Barbados by 72 after dashing to 270 for seven and brushing the Pride aside for 198 after the ninth wicket had fallen at 149 with 15.4 overs to go. Jamaica’s feeble attempt included a winning 139 for 8 against Barbados, a losing 139 against Trinidad and Tobago, a losing 176 versus Trinidad and Tobago, and a losing 173 against Barbados. The Trinidad and Tobago Red Force, short of some of their better players, by birth, including Dwayne Bravo, Kieron Pollard, Sunil Narine, Lendl Simmons, and Samuel Badree, walked away with the Nagico Super50 Trophy a week ago, and easily and comprehensively at that. Led by batsmen Darren Bravo and Denesh Ramdin towards the end, left-handed opening batsman Ervin Lewis, who dazzled for a while, all-rounder Narsingh Deonarine, and medium-pacer Rayad Emrit, as well as opening batsman Kyle Ottley, pacer Marlon Richards, off-spinner John Russ Jaggesar, and left-arm spinner Akeal Hosein, Trinidad and Tobago were in control from start to finish. Considered not good enough to win the tournament at the start, the team began well, playing confidently and attractively before they were joined by their two big guns. From there on, there was no doubt, or hardly any doubt, as to who the winners would be. The Red Force of Trinidad and Tobago rolled past the toothless Guyana Jaguars in the semi-finals by 54 runs, and past the humiliated Barbados Pride by 72 in the final. In losing one match, to Barbados, when it did not matter, Trinidad and Tobago Red Force were streets and lanes above the others. Barbados, Guyana, the Windward Islands, and Jamaica were no match for the Red Force, and much better than the International Cricket Council (ICC) Americas, who failed to win a game, and the Leeward Islands, who won one. Trinidad and Tobago’s Lewis, who cracked 74 off 74 deliveries and 102 not out off 100 deliveries against Jamaica, and Kyle Hope and Kjorn Ottley looked good at the start, Richards bowled well, Emrit also bowled well, and Jaggesar, Deonarine, and Hosein all bowled well – all three spin bowlers mixing good line, good length, and teasing flight to stifle the opposing batsmen.last_img read more

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Coral Islands Rise With Sea Level

first_imgWorries about sea-level rise inundating coral atolls and islands are unfounded, thanks to coral’s rapid response to change.A team of 5 geologists from Australia and New Zealand has good news: islands and coral atolls in the South Pacific are not at risk from sea level rise as much as earlier thought. Their paper in Geology, “Coral islands defy sea-level rise over the past century: Records from a central Pacific atoll,” shows from observations over a century that corals are able to respond rapidly to sea level fluctuations—on the order of decades or centuries, not millions of years.The geological stability and existence of low-lying atoll nations is threatened by sea-level rise and climate change. Funafuti Atoll, in the tropical Pacific Ocean, has experienced some of the highest rates of sea-level rise (∼5.1 ± 0.7 mm/yr), totaling ∼0.30 ± 0.04 m over the past 60 yr. We analyzed six time slices of shoreline position over the past 118 yr at 29 islands of Funafuti Atoll to determine their physical response to recent sea-level rise. Despite the magnitude of this rise, no islands have been lost, the majority have enlarged, and there has been a 7.3% increase in net island area over the past century (A.D. 1897–2013). There is no evidence of heightened erosion over the past half-century as sea-level rise accelerated. Reef islands in Funafuti continually adjust their size, shape, and position in response to variations in boundary conditions, including storms, sediment supply, as well as sea level.While this is good news for the islanders, it is bad news for alarmists:Results suggest a more optimistic prognosis for the habitability of atoll nations and demonstrate the importance of resolving recent rates and styles of island change to inform adaptation strategies.In other words, alarmists were misinformed.Phosphorus for UsAll life, including coral, requires phosphorus, but the “Phosphorus Cycle” has been poorly understood. How does this essential element cycle through land and sea? The ocean’s “hidden fertilizer” was investigated by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute. Science Daily reports,Phosphorus is one of the most common substances on Earth. An essential nutrient for every living organism — humans require approximately 700 milligrams per day — we are rarely concerned about consuming enough of it because it is present in most of the foods we eat. Despite its ubiquity and living organisms’ utter dependence on it, we know surprisingly little about how it moves, or cycles, through the ocean environment.Taking samples of plankton from a boat in the Bermuda area, they found three new things. First, the phosphorus cycle is “much more complex than previously thought.” Second, they uncovered a “previously hidden role that some microbial communities play in using and breaking down forms of this essential element.” And third, “these results show for the first time that microbes are producing phosphonates in the ocean, and that it is happening very quickly.” The element must be made available in a form life can utilize. Microbes metabolize phosphorus into phosphonate, forming the basis of the marine food web.“Such work will help us further resolve the complexities of how this critical element is cycled in the ocean,” Dyhrman adds.“A reason to be excited about the findings of this elegant study is in the paper’s last sentence: ‘the environmental, ecological, and evolutionary controls . . . remain completely unknown.’ There’s still a lot we don’t know about the sea,” says Don Rice, program director in the National Science Foundation’s Division of Ocean Sciences, which funded the research.The phosphorus cycle joins the carbon cycle, water cycle, nitrogen cycle, ozone layer, and other global systems that keep our planet habitable. Environmental and ecological systems seem apparent, but whatever an “evolutionary control” might be is unclear.In Science Magazine, Claudia Benitez-Nelson describes the chemistry of the phosphorus cycle in more detail, noting that phosphonate, a reduced form of phosphorus, is energetically expensive. “Why organisms produce energetically expensive, reduced phosphorus compounds remains a mystery, particularly given that these compounds are subsequently released to surrounding waters,” she says. “…. the environmental factors that contribute to the production and release of reduced phosphorus compounds in surface waters remain unknown. Perhaps this redox cycling is related to the evolution of cyanobacteria and archaea more than 3 billion years ago.” That would be because “At that time, phosphorus concentrations in the oceans were very low because high concentrations of ferrous oxides scavenged and removed phosphorus preferentially from the surface ocean.” She says the new study might provide a “missing link in ocean phosphorus cycling” indicating that everything is in balance today. In short, the researchers found “a large, rapidly recycled pool of reduced phosphorus compounds that play a key role in ocean phosphorus biogeochemistry.” The original paper by Van Mooy et al. is in the same issue of Science Magazine, which states, “Overall, our study suggests that the production of phosphonates and/or phosphite contributes to a globally vast phosphorus redox cycle that exceeds the magnitude of phosphate inputs to the ocean.”There’s another piece of the puzzle: one of dozens of factors required for our privileged planet. It’s amazing that the phosphorus cycle involves chemistry, geology and biology working in concert to keep an essential nutrient in balance.As for sea level rise, we’re not saying that the “optimistic prognosis” for atoll nations applies to all shorelines, nor using this information as justification to ignore the impacts of a changing climate. That’s not the point of quoting this paper. There are two lessons here. (1) Modelers who simplistically thought that atolls would be inundated by rising sea levels underestimated the response of coral to “variations in boundary conditions” of all kinds. The islands actually grew and prospered in spite of predicted catastrophes. (2) Without access to the full paper, we’re not sure if they referred to Darwin’s theory about coral atolls. However, the rapid response of the islands to changes in just one century calls into question the assumption that long ages are required for coral island formation. Creation geologists may wish to investigate this paper in detail.Let’s also use this occasion on Memorial Day to honor the brave Americans who gave their lives in the South Pacific fighting nations that did not believe that we are endowed by our Creator with certain unalienable rights. We can never thank them enough for their service. (Visited 39 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Baleka Mbete appointed Speaker of Parliament

first_img22 May 2014African National Congress (ANC) chairperson Baleka Mbete was elected Speaker of Parliament, replacing Max Sisulu, during the the first sitting of South Africa’s fifth democratic Parliament in Cape Town on Wednesday.Mbete was elected Members of Parliament after beating Nosimo Bhalendlela, who was nominated by the Democratic Alliance, in a secret ballot, winning 260 votes to Bhalendlela’s 80.The house broke out into ululations when the Chief Justice Mogoeng Mogoeng made the announcement.Mbete was the Speaker from 2005 to 2008. She also served for a while as the country’s Deputy President after the recall of Thabo Mbeki in 2008. She is described by MPs who have worked with her as strong, capable and effective.Mbete said she was humbled by her appointment and would carry out her tasks conscious of the Constitution. “Your trust in me has not been misplaced,” she said.Mbete welcomed new members to the house, saying more than half had not served in the previous Parliament. She reminded them of their mandate to serve the people who had voted for them.“After 20 years of democracy, we dare not fail our people. Let us further entrench the spirit of democracy. Let each one of us represent our people with dignity and honour.”Earlier in Wednesday’s proceedings, Chief Justice Mogoeng presided over the swearing in ceremony of the 400 new Members of Parliament, representing 13 political parties.In batches of 10, the new MPS took an oath affirming their faithfulness to the Republic and obedience to the Constitution.The first group included President Jacob Zuma, ANC Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa, and current Cabinet ministers Malusi Gigaba, Naledi Pandor, Jeff Radebe, Fikile Mbalula, Blade Nzimande, Bathabile Dlamini, Lindiwe Sisulu and Collins Chabane.Approximately 42 percent of South Africa’s new MPs are women. In terms of age, the oldest is 85 and the youngest 22. The average age of the representatives is 50.Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

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What to Consider When Upgrading to the Pocket Cinema 6K

first_imgPocket 4K vs. Pocket 6K? This article discusses the relevancy of both — as well as the price points and specs related to each.Prices are rapidly dropping, panic is running amok, and conspiracies are rife. No, it’s not the next recession; it’s the Pocket 4K community growing frantic over the imminent arrival of the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 6K. The camera has drawn a lot of excitement and an equal measure of unease. Many Pocket 4K users are wondering if they should upgrade, or if they’ve been cheated out of their 4K investment.While I can’t speak for the entirety of the Pocket 4K community, I do want to evaluate some of the concerns about the Pocket 4K now that the new model has seemingly replaced it (which it hasn’t).(Note: this is not a critique of the Pocket 6K. The specs alone are mind-boggling.)Don’t Undervalue the Pocket 4K’s Resale PriceLook, we’re not going to tell you what to do with your equipment—or how to sell it—but don’t devalue the camera just to get a quick sale. As Grant Petty said in last week’s live-demonstration, there have been a few setbacks with the electrical’s market, which has meant a delay in getting these cameras to retailers. Therefore, you have to consider that the Pocket 4K isn’t readily available to everyone. B&H continually dip in and out of stock, it feels like my UK retailer has never been in stock, and as a result, the camera is still in demand on the aftermarket. And until Blackmagic stops producing this camera, the Pocket 4K is far from obsolete.Looking at recent eBay sales, the Pocket 4K has sold at $150 above the current RRP. However, in the camera’s social media groups, many are offloading this camera for as low as $750. Of course, there are various factors that justify a discounted price—hours used, cosmetic wear, missing original accessories, and so on. But still, so early into the life cycle of the model, there’s no real reason to undercut yourself when stores themselves can’t even fulfill orders.Data and Battery LifeRecently I published a YouTube video titled How Much Does the BMPCC4K Actually Cost? The video breaks down the various factors that contribute to the overall cost of the camera. The 6K model is undoubtedly going to increase the price point, with expanded data storage and power options.At the highest constant bit rate encoding option—3:1—the Pocket 4K clocks in with a storage rate of 135 MB/s. The Pocket 6K, however, will be bringing in 3:1 footage at a colossal 323 MB/s. Roughly, you’re looking at just under 19GB a minute. That 256GB CFast 2.0 card you have suddenly only stores fourteen minutes of footage when shooting at a max constant bit rate. However, I would imagine that with such high resolution, even shooting at 12:1 6K would still bring in favorable shots. And this reels in at 81 MB/s, which would give you sixty-five minutes with 6K recording.Therefore, you have to acknowledge that, along with an extra $1000 for the new camera, you’re more than likely going to be buying more recording media, and more offline storage.(Side note, there are currently no SSD cards on the market that can capture 6K 50fps, as retailer CVP points out in the following video.)One thing does concern me, that’s the 50p data rate. So, if my math is correct, using Blackmagic’s data on the website, 6K 3:1 at 50fps would be 538 MB/s, and QO (their variable bit rate option) could go as high as 805 MB/s a second. Currently, you won’t be able to record that.The fastest CFast 2.0 on the market taps out at around 500 MB/s. And while using the USB-C 3.1 port, you can connect an SSD that can reach 800 MB/s, the Pocket 6K uses a USB-C 3.1 Gen 1 port, which taps out at 625 MB/s.Likewise, if there was one constant issue that appeared in every review and every discussion video when the Pocket 4K first came out, it was the abysmal battery life. Since the release, we have had a firmware update, which increases the longevity of a single LP-E6 battery by fifteen to twenty minutes. However, with the new build, we’re back down to a forty to forty-five minute run time for a single LP-E6. Meaning (and I recommend not using LP-E6s anyway) that you’re going to have to grab a few more to err on the side of caution.How Important Is the “Full Frame” Factor?I would argue that the super 35mm sensor is more of a selling point for this camera than either the EF mount or the 6K resolution. Blackmagic’s Super 35mm (-ish) sensor is closer to 35mm film than the 4K’s MFT sensor; therefore, similar visual attributes, such as focal lengths, will be the same as 35mm film.The issue with crop factor is that for cinema, Super 35mm is a standard. Whereas for stills, which bleed into digital video, full-frame is the standard, and anything smaller yields a crop factor. Meaning a 50mm on one camera may capture images at a focal length equivalent to 67mm on a full-frame sensor. As the photo and video world has seemingly blended into one another and borrowed terms, sometimes principles fall into a gray area of confusion. As with the Pocket 6K, you have a 1.558 crop factor. But again, that’s in comparison to a full-frame stills sensor, when in regards to Super 35mm film, there isn’t a crop factor.That said, many do factor the crop factor as a detriment, and would prefer to be shooting as close to full-frame as possible. If that’s something you want to do, then although the Pocket 4K has a crop factor of 1.89, with the newly released Metabones Speed Booster specifically engineered for the BMPCC4K, you can reduce the crop factor to 1.43 with the Ultra 0.71x model — or with the XL 0.64x version, you can decrease the crop factor even further to 1.29. Therefore, if you want to capture as much of the frame as possible, the Pocket 4K and Metabones Speed Booster combo provide a better option.There are, of course, many benefits to the 6K model. We can’t speak to all of them just yet, as we’ve yet to review the camera, the 6K resolution, the increased FPS, the anamorphic mode, the EF mount, and so on. But these new features don’t suddenly make the Pocket 4K model obsolete. You’re still getting 4K RAW for $1250—or $1000, if you remove the Resolve Studio license—and that, in itself, is crazy when just a decade ago 4K for $4K seemed like a dream.Cover image via Blackmagic.Looking for more articles on film and video gear? Check these out.The Dana Dolly: A Quintessential Cinematic Tool for Filmmakers5 Documentary-Style Lenses for 5 Budgets.How to Mount the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K on the Ronin-MBMPCC4K Tips: The Difference Between Constant Bitrate and Constant QualityAputure Releases the 300D II — with Lantern Attachmentlast_img read more

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Eagles claw Archers

first_imgPhoto by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netThirdy Ravena nailed a triple with 9.2 seconds remaining as Ateneo stunned fierce rival La Salle, 80-78, Sunday night to stay in the quarterfinal hunt in the Filoil Flying V Premier Cup.Momentarily open at the left corner, Ravena hoisted the shot while drawing a foul on Ricci Rivero to give the Blue Eagles the lead for good, 76-74, much to the delight of the Ateneo faithful at Filoil Flying V Centre in San Juan.ADVERTISEMENT Cayetano dares Lacson, Drilon to take lie-detector test: Wala akong kinita sa SEA Games Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next WATCH: Firefighters rescue baby seal found in parking garage View comments Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ LATEST STORIES MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. With the victory, San Beda improved to 6-0, virtually clinching a place in the quarterfinals of the preseason event.The Eagles looked like they were on their way to the victory when they took a 73-68 lead heading into the final minutes.But La Salle responded with six straight points capped by a Ben Mbala putback for a 74-73 lead with 18.3 seconds left.Ravena missed the bonus free throw, but teammate Matt Nieto hauled down the rebound leading to another foul for two more charities, 78-74.Hardly looking the squad that ruled this tournament in emphatic fashion last year, La Salle fell to 4-3 as it continued to miss Kib Montalbo and Prince Rivero to injuries.Letran absorbed its sixth loss in seven games.ADVERTISEMENTcenter_img World’s 50 Best Restaurants launches new drinking and dining guide Mangulabnan cops Superbikes, Expert plums “It was a big shot by Thirdy (Ravena),” said Ateneo coach Tab Baldwin, whose Eagles improved to 3-2 in the preseason tournament . “We don’t want to rely on big shots to win the game, but it’s good that we get one when we need it.”The rivals’ first match since their UAAP finals meeting won by La Salle last year turned out to be a hotly contested affair with technical fouls called on players from both teams.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutEarlier, San Beda maintained its unblemished record with a 75-63 drubbing of Letran in a battle of NCAA rivals, while National U leaned on JJ Alejandro’s big game to subdue St. Benilde, 104-88.Robert Bolick fired 17 points to lead the Red Lions, who rallied from an early deficit with a strong performance in the third quarter. What ‘missteps’? Heart Evangelista admits she’s pregnant… with chicken Heart Evangelista admits she’s pregnant… with chicken Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games 1 dead in Cavite blast, firelast_img read more

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Saina & co win, India continue good run

first_imgTop seed Saina Nehwal breezed through her match as India continued their rampaging run in the tournament with all the shuttlers in the singles and doubles category winning their respective matches in the individual badminton event of the Commonwealth Games on Sunday.World number three Saina thrashed Sarah Thomas of Wales 21-5 21-9 to reach closer to her first Commonwealth games gold, while Melbourne bronze medallist Chetan Anand beat Nigerian Ola Fagbemi 21-12 21-6 in 21 minutes to stay on course of bettering his record at the sporting extravaganza.Debutants P Kashyap and Aditi Mutatkar also stormed into the third round in the singles event with straight-game victories in their second round match.Sixth seed Kashyap saw off 21-5 21-12 Jamaican Pyne Charles, while Pune girl Aditi, seeded fifth, took 17 minutes to make short work of Sri Lankan Subodha Kumari 21-14 21-7 in another match at the Siri Fort sport complex here.Mixed doubles pair of Jwala Gutta and V Diju, who got a bye in the first round, also stormed into the next round with a 21-13 21-8 spanking of Jamaican Henry Gareth Andre Theodore and Kristal Karjohn Fayonne in a 14-minute match.While Sanave Thomas and Aparna Balan also continued their good run and beat Nigerian combo of Fagbemi Ebenezar Olaoluwa and Braimah Hajara Maria 21-10 21-8 to reach the third round.Rupesh Kumar and Ashwini Ponnappa also struggled past Australian duo of Veeran Raj and Vithi Veeran Renuga 21-16 18-21 21-18 in a 36-minute battle.Earlier, Aditi had a shaky start as she allowed the Sri Lankan to open a 5-2 lead but the Indian soon clawed back at 9-8 and after surviving some crucial moments moved to 16-13 before pocketing the game.advertisementIn the next game, she didn’t give Subodha any chance and moved to 11-4 at the break and held her fort to claim an easy win.Kashyap too didn’t face much of a challenge from the Jamaican as he moved to 5-2 first before registering 12 straight points to zoom to 19-5. The next game too saw Kashyap zoomed to a 6-0 lead and held his fort to canter to an easy win.”It was a kind of easy match. I played a lot of strokes and I had a good rhythm going. In the second game I played a lot of cross court shots and taps and it gave me good points.The next match will be tougher. I hope to do well,” he said.Saina, who got a bye in the first match, took the court amid the cheers of the crowd and the Indian straight away got into business moving to 11-3 at the break.She kept the shuttle down and played cross court shots to make Sarah huff and puff across the court, grabbing next 10 points while conceding just one to wrap up the first game.The next game was no different, although Saina had a few problem with her cross court smashes but a change of racquet made things easier for her.”My strokes were coming good today and I played faster. I have been playing well during the team events as well. A few of my cross court smashes went out in the second game but otherwise I didn’t make any glaring mistake,” Saina said.Second seeds Jwala and Diju, meanwhile, took some giant strides as they moved from 6-4 to 13-8 and 18-10 before wrapping it up at 21-13 in the first game.The second game was no different as the Indian duo jumped to 6-2 before moving to 11-6 at the break, before grabbing six straight points to widen the gap to 18-7.”We played very freely today and our shots were also coming good. When you play team events there is an amount of pressure which comes from the sense of responsibility. So today it was different and it was lighter. We hope to continue our good run,” Jwala said.last_img read more

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Pull the Plug on Powerplay

first_imgNasser HussainThere has been a lot of commotion and concern around the batting powerplay in this World Cup and the sides most affected by it are not the minnows but teams such as India and England.Batting powerplay is not an exact science. There are those who insist there is a definite way of doing things during a batting powerplay. I disagree. Every game, every situation, every team is different. So is the frame of mind of the batsmen at the crease at that point. But one thing is certain. Most teams have not quite got their batting powerplays right.The batting powerplay is about changing the momentum of the game if it needs to be changed. I have seen too many sides in a comfortable winning position throwing away the advantage by opting for a batting powerplay. India and England erred in Bangalore which ultimately resulted in their sharing points in a game either side should have won.At Nagpur, against South Africa, India were cruising at 267 for 1 and looking at a 350-plus total. They opted for the powerplay in the 38th over and lost their last 9 wickets for just 29 runs. I can’t understand why India would want Sachin Tendulkar and Gautam Gambhir to start slogging all of a sudden when they were easily scoring a run a ball. They should have taken the powerplay in the 45th over when it would have become mandatory to take it. I agree with captain M. S. Dhoni that the boys got carried away with the situation. Let’s not also forget that Dale Steyn is the world’s best fast bowler and he deserves full praise for destroying the Indian batting and winning the man of the match award in a high-scoring game.advertisementMy advice to all captains is that leave the powerplay for the last five overs of your innings when things are looking good. Or take it when you think are losing the game. Ireland was in tatters against England when they opted for the powerplay at 111 for 5. They knew they could not win the game in singles and twos. They had to try and change the momentum and were able to, thanks to Kevin O’brien’s match-winning century. Whether the going is good or not, there must be a stop-loss strategy around the powerplay. For instance, if the team loses two wickets, they will have to start playing normally again. So, batsmen must first get their eyes in before they go for the big shots.During the powerplay against South Africa at Nagpur. India lost four wickets, including that of Tendulkar.During a powerplay, you have eight fielders within the 30-yard circle, which makes it difficult to pierce the gaps and get the singles. A couple of dot balls only increases the pressure on the batsmen. Given the hot and humid conditions in the subcontinent, fatigue sets in, and batsmen prefer to go for the big shots. We have seen set batsmen such as Tendulkar (twice), Andrew Strauss, Virender Sehwag and Ian Bell succumb to audacious shots during the powerplay.There is a lesson for fielding captains as well. If things aren’t going your way, bring those fielders in, stop the singles and create pressure on the batsmen, even if it’s not a powerplay. The only captain who has practised this is William Porterfield of Ireland.Dhoni has been criticised for giving Ashish Nehra the last over at Nagpur. That is uncalled for. If I were the captain, I would have handed the ball to Harbhajan Singh as he is India’s best bowler after Zaheer Khan and a feisty competitor. Whether the result would have been different is impossible to know. But let me remind those, who believe that an off spinner is more difficult to read for a left-handed batsman, about how Michael Hussey shattered the figures of Saeed Ajmal in the 2010 icc World Twenty20. Robin Peterson is no mug with the bat.The World Cup is advancing to the knock-out stage. Group B is where all the action is. To progress to the next round, England must beat West Indies but need South Africa to win their remaining matches. India need to win its last group match to qualify. South Africa, Bangladesh and Ireland are also in the running for a place at the quarters. Group A is more or less decided. Australia, Pakistan, New Zealand and Sri Lanka are likely to make the cut. This certainly has been the most intense group competition in any cricket World Cup so far.advertisement- Nasser Hussain is a former captain of the England cricket team. Syndicated by Sporting Excellencelast_img read more

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