Dorms begin to decorate for Christmas season

first_imgIt’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas on campus. Though there may not be snow on the ground, many dorms have already begun to get into the Christmas spirit by decking the halls with unique decorations.Rosie LoVoi From the outside, passersby can see Breen-Phillips Hall’s Christmas spirit shining through candles in the windows that are put out every year after Thanksgiving, Ashley Huffman — Breen-Phillips’ president — said.However, Breen-Phillips residents get more excited about competitive holiday-themed section decorating, Huffman said.“Each section will choose a theme, and everyone in the section decorates the whole hallway with that theme,” Huffman said. “We have judges come in and pick a winning section. … This year, we’re announcing the winner at a Christmas Party.”Past themes have included “Creaster” (a blend of Christmas and Easter), Harry Potter and naughty and nice. Most of the decorations are handmade, Huffman said.“The candles look really pretty when you see them on the quad, but [it’s] especially the decorations in the sections people really like,” Huffman said. “It’s cool to see, but it’s also cool to see all the sections because all the girls can work together and have fun doing that together.”Pasquerilla West Hall celebrates the holiday season with a tradition not to be found anywhere else on campus: a lighting and decorating ceremony of the bush located in the center of the roundabout in front of the dorm.“We have the ugly bush lighting ceremony every year around Christmas time,” Allison Huffman, Pasquerilla West’s president, said. “Everyone stands in a circle around the ugly bush, and we count down to the lighting of the bush. Once the lights are plugged in, everyone sings our ugly bush song to the tune of ‘O’ Christmas Tree.’ After singing, we go inside and have a memory night and look at all of the pictures from the past semester.”This year, Pasquerilla West will light the ugly bush Tuesday.“The ugly bush is unique to PW, so I think that a tradition only we have makes the girls in PW feel special and connected to something,” Huffman said. “It is also just a weird tradition, but it is fun and brings us all together.”The McGlinn shamrock shines as the dorm’s own Christmas star for the Christmas season. The shamrock was made by a student around 10 years ago to rival O’Neil’s signature “O wreath,” McGlinn president Madeline Petrovich said.“Around 10 years ago, a girl in McGlinn actually made it when she wanted to put something up for Christmas,” Petrovich said. “She made it with wires  and put the lights on. I guess it fell apart, but the workers who put it up fixed it, and they still put it up every year. … It goes up every year around Christmas.”Though the shamrock, made of garland, wires and lights in the shape of a giant shamrock, isn’t a traditional Christmas symbol, it has become one for the dorm over the years, Petrovich said. This year, the shamrock will be put up on Dec. 5.“Most people really appreciate it when you’re walking back from the library at an ungodly hour for finals and you turn around the corner on South Dining Hall and you see it,” Petrovich said. “It’s very nice, kind of calming. You’re like, ‘Alright, it’s Christmas.’”Tags: christmas, decorations, dormlast_img read more

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COMMENTARY: As times change, so do the ways we experience sports

first_img Mike MandellMike Mandell is the sports editor at The Ellsworth American and Mount Desert Islander. He began working for The American in August 2016. You can reach him via email at mmandell@ellsworthamerican.com. Latest Posts Ellsworth runners compete in virtual Boston Marathon – September 16, 2020 Every two weeks, Mike Mandell gives his thoughts on the sports scene in Ellsworth, Hancock County and beyond.ELLSWORTH — Last Wednesday, April 26, was one of the most discouraging days in recent memory for sports writers nationwide. In a round of massive layoffs, ESPN, the world’s largest most and profitable sports media organization, axed more than 100 journalists, anchors and personalities.Over the course of the day, employees of as long as two or three decades — some of whom were among the most renowned in sports media — announced via social media they were being let go. It was a display of how cord-cutting, new web technology and the rise of smartphones have all severely affected the journalism industry.The internet has completely changed how sports fans experience the games we love. Gone are the days when fans had to wait for the morning paper or the local newscast to see whether their favorite teams won or lost. We can know that information instantly via Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and every other tool that’s made instant communication the norm in today’s society.In the face of those changes, the way reporting happens has also changed. Shows such as “SportsCenter” have had to completely alter their programming because the product they offer is easily fulfilled without TV. That wasn’t the case for the first 30 years of ESPN’s existence, but it is now.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textThose of us in the print industry know this all too well. Over the past 10 years, some newspapers have even gone as far as getting rid of their print editions after determining they weren’t viable. That’s not to say modern reporting is on the brink of death, but it’s certainly in an era of transition.Although box scores and feature stories are here to stay, other parts of the job will become relics of a time gone by. For example, much of the information printed in the edition of The Ellsworth American that ran 75 years ago this week — consisting mostly of sentence-long tidbits about everyday people visiting town or recovering from illnesses — would probably not be seen as “news” today. Yet the world was a different place in 1942, and the news was no exception.As is the case for writers on other beats, sports writers now have the ability to tell stories in ways readers even 10 years ago couldn’t imagine. We can do more with a sports page of the newspaper than ever and are finding newer ways to take that information beyond the page with the internet. To do so, some of the old methods must go by the wayside.ESPN changed its programming not to “reach a new audience” but because it realized the niche that had helped make “SportsCenter” relevant in the past was gone. With the speed at which the world was changing, it had to adapt on the fly to figure out what worked. In some cases, it found the right formula. In many others, it failed.Not every audience is the same of, course; The Ellsworth American appeals to very different groups than national sports outlets do and therefore has little to no overlap with them in terms of content. Changes are going to happen at different rates in different places, and for national news organizations, that rate is only going to accelerate.On a promising note, there will always be a need for local news. The focus The Ellsworth American gives to sports within Hancock County is something other media outlets can’t provide. As long as sports exist, folks from the Penobscot River to Schoodic Point will want to read about the people who bring them to life in their communities.It’s hard to tell where sports media will go from here, but the sports experience has evolved across the board. Some of the changes have been related to sports themselves, but far more have been related to technology — technology that will continue to evolve in the future.The sports world is becoming radically different each day. The ways we bring readers news about sports must stay ahead of the curve. Hospice volunteers help families navigate grief and find hope – September 12, 2020center_img MPA approves golf, XC, field hockey, soccer; football, volleyball moved to spring – September 10, 2020 Latest posts by Mike Mandell (see all) Biolast_img read more

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