Supporters of AB5 Rally in San Diego

first_img Updated: 9:29 AM SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez, D-San Diego, will join with local workers Thursday to call for the passage of a bill she authored that would limit when businesses and companies could classify employees as independent contractors.Assembly Bill 5 would codify worker protections established in last year’s state Supreme Court decision in the case of Dynamex Operations West Inc. v. Superior Court of Los Angeles. If passed, the bill would reclassify thousands of California workers like Uber drivers and exotic dancers as employees rather than independent contractors.There are some oppositions from some rideshare drivers who fear the passage of the bill would take away their ability to work when they want to.Opponents said the bill doesn’t accurately reflect today’s realities. They are concerned it would move the state backward by eliminating their choice to work independently.They also argue that many people drive for Uber and Lyft to earn extra money to supplement their day job. If the drivers become full-time employees, they will no longer be able to continue driving part-time. This will leave a considerable gap in the transportation that millions of consumers rely on every day.The two giant ride-sharing companies, Uber and Lyft, are by far the most vocal opponents of the bill.The Assembly passed AB 5 in May and it currently sits in the state Senate as companies attempt to carve out exemptions for specific industries like ride-booking and food delivery services. The bill has also drawn national attention due to support from Democratic presidential candidates and Sens. Elizabeth Warren, D-Massachusetts, Bernie Sanders, I-Vermont, and Kamala Harris, D-California.Janitorial workers and representatives of Rideshare Drivers United in Southern California, the United Taxi Workers Alliance, the Employee Rights Center and the Sierra Club are expected to join Gonzalez at the rally and news conference to call for AB 5’s passage. The rally is scheduled to begin at 9:30 a.m. at Waterfront Park. KUSI Newsroom Posted: August 10, 2019 Categories: California News, Local San Diego News FacebookTwittercenter_img KUSI Newsroom, Supporters of AB5 Rally in San Diego August 10, 2019last_img read more

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Discord Slack for gamers tops 250 million registered users

first_img Share your voice Culture Gaming 0 Post a commentcenter_img Many gamers these days like to play online with friends. Discord helps them do that. Getty Images You may never have heard of Discord, but you might soon. The chat app built initially for gamers has been steadily expanding outside that world as it’s increasingly used by YouTube personalities, podcasters, hackers and more. Overall, the company says it counts more than 250 million registered users, or basically the same number of people who’ve signed up to play the cultural phenom Fortnight. More than 56 million people log in each month on the app, which marks its fourth anniversary Monday. “As Discord has grown, it’s gone mainstream,” the company said in a statement. direct-message-screenDiscord is praised for its sleek design, similar to business chat software Slack. Discord While it’s true the 165-person company has become popular outside of gaming, its most popular “servers” (or, chat rooms) are typically gaming related. The top server is for Fortnite, followed by a similar battle game Spellbreak, then Fortnite competitor PUBG. Microsoft’s world building game Minecraft, Supercell’s strategy game Clash Royale and Ubisoft’s Rainbow 6 military survival game are also popular. Its good-natured gaming roots and slick design have made it popular among gamers looking to easily chat with friends or organize a gaming session from across town or on another side of the world. It’s often called “Slack for gamers,” a reference to the similarly designed business software that’s expected to hold an initial public offering this year. But Discord has a darker side. White supremacists and hackers have gravitated to the platform, in part because of its ease of use and insufficient bureaucracy to track and punish them. That’s different from companies like Facebook and Twitter, which have employee bases many times larger than Discord’s and have taken a harder line, even using computer programs to identify and then excise bad actors from their communities.  Still, San Francisco-based Discord is pushing forward. It’s launched a game sales service to compete with the likes of Fortnite maker Epic and Valve’s popular “Steam” store. The company declined to say how many games it’s sold through that effort.  Tagslast_img read more

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For Best Debutant Sara Ali Khan this is the most important thing

first_imgSara Ali KhanPR HandoutThe promising actress who emerged as the best debutant with her first film, Sara Ali Khan is also one of the most sought after actresses currently where her films have charted smashing records at the box office. With the beginning of a successful acting journey, this is what Sara has to say about what the most important thing is for her.With many things happening simultaneously, the most important thing for Sara for her career as an actor is conviction. Talking about it Sara shares, “I look at my career as a new chapter and it gets extremely important to act. I think it’s extremely important to do good work and it’s extremely important to remember that fame. So one thing that I look for sure is conviction. Either in my role or in my director, or in my script, or in the world, there needs to be a conviction.”The actress seems to be grounded even after seeing success early in her career, owing to the values she has inculcated throughout her life and a testimony of the same is the gestures of the actress at various instances. Sara created immense buzz much before her debut and is a Paparazzi favourite which surely makes her the ‘Buzz girl’ of the industry.Sara chose the unconventional path as she made her debut in the Hindi film industry right after she finished her education where she studied abroad. Only after the release of her films, Sara chose to get featured on the covers of the leading magazines. Spotted always with a smile and greeting everyone the actress comes across as the warmest celebrity.Sara Ali Khan who is just 2 films old in Bollywood, has become the sensation within such a short span of time with marketers betting big on her and filmmakers seeking to sign her.The actress already has 11 brand endorsements in her kitty, with an estimated annual revenue of over 30 crores, this year alone and the brands range right from a sports brand to a jewellery brand.The actress will be next seen in recently announced Imtiaz Ali ‘s next alongside Kartik Aaryan and with Varun Dhawan Coolie No. 1 both of it slated to release next year.last_img read more

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16 Rohingyas detained in Cumilla

first_imgPolice detain 16 Rohingyas from Cumilla district. Photo: UNBPolice detained 16 Rohingyas from Brahmanpara upazila of Cumilla district on Thursday.The detainees are Hamida Begum, 60, Sabbir Ahmed, 30, Sabbir’s wife Hasina Begum, 30, Sabbir’s four children — Jabed, 12, Saber, 10, Majid, 6 and Sadek, 2, — Hamid Nur, 25, Hamid’s wife Fatema, 23, Hamid’s two sons -Faruk, 3 and Khaiyam Nur, 1 — Nur Haba, 28, Abdur Rahim, 10, Shahida Akter, 5 and Ismail, 6.Tipped off, a team of police conducted a drive in the area and detained them, said SAM Shahjahan Kabir, officer-in-charge of Brahmanpara police station.All of them will be sent to Cox’s Bazar Rohingya camp, Shahjahan added.last_img

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UN pushes for ceasefire at Yemen talks

first_imgHuthi representative Salim al-Moughaless (L) and Yemeni economist and government representative Ahmed Ghaleb (R) shake hands during the first Yemen peace talks since 2016, on 10 December 2018 in the Swedish rural town of Rimbo. A mass prisoner swap between Yemeni rebels and the government, a key issue at UN-brokered peace talks in Sweden, has been finalised, both sides said today. Brokered by UN special envoy Martin Griffiths earlier this month, it is one of the main points at talks between the government and Huthi rebels in Sweden this week. Photo: PhotoMediators in UN-brokered talks on Yemen pushed Wednesday for a truce between warring parties as a crucial step to allow aid deliveries, with 24 hours left in the negotiations.But the likeliest issue on which the parties could agree is Sanaa airport, shut down for years in the war between the Saudi-backed government and northern rebels linked to Iran.Yemeni government representatives told reporters the rivals were hammering out the final details on an airport deal. Two rebel negotiators denied to AFP that their team had agreed to a UN proposal as yet.UN negotiators are seeking a de-escalation of violence in two flashpoint cities: rebel-held Hodeida, a port city vital to the supply of humanitarian aid, and Taiz, Yemen’s third largest city, scene of some of the war’s most intense fighting.UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres was due at the talks in Rimbo, Sweden, for Thursday’s closing round of consultations. His arrival comes hours after his office said it had evidence the rebel Huthis were using Iran-made missiles.- ‘No agreement’ -The Sweden talks, which opened Thursday, mark the first meeting between Yemen’s Huthi rebels and the government of President Abedrabbo Mansour Hadi, backed since 2015 by a behemoth military coalition led by Saudi Arabia.Both government and rebel representatives have traded accusations of unwillingness to negotiate, particularly on rebel-held Hodeida, the main route for 90 percent of food imports and nearly 80 percent of aid deliveries.Multiple draft proposals have been submitted to the two delegations over the past week. None have found consensus as yet.Yemeni ministers Othman Mujalli and Marwan Dammaj told reporters Wednesday their camp would hold firm to UN Security Council Resolution 2216 — which calls for the Huthis to withdraw from all areas seized in a 2014 takeover, including Hodeida.The rebels have refused a full withdrawal.Yemeni Foreign Minister Khaled al-Yamani this week proposed government-held Aden as Yemen’s sole international airport, with Sanaa turning into a hub for domestic flights.The government accuses the rebels of arms smuggling through Sanaa airport and the Red Sea port of Hodeida, and the Saudi-led coalition has severely restricted flights to and from Sanaa for years.While a source inside the talks said a deal had been reached on Sanaa airport, rebel representative Abdelmalik al-Ajri told AFP his team had not agreed to the latest proposal.”There is no agreement,” Ajri said. “Talks are ongoing.””The issue today is the airport, the final touches,” said Othman Mujalli, Yemen’s agriculture minister and a member of the government delegation.”Today’s discussion is around (Sanaa airport), which will be a domestic airport for flights that have been searched during a stop in Aden.”The Yemen conflict has killed nearly 10,000 people since the Saudi-led coalition joined the war in 2015, according to the World Health Organization, triggering what the UN calls the world’s worst humanitarian crisis.Both parties stand accused of failing to protect civilians. The Saudi-led alliance has been blacklisted by the UN for the killing and maiming of children.last_img read more

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From Foster Care to Park Heights Leader

first_imgBy Sean Yoes, Baltimore AFRO Editor, syoes@afro.comAs Pamela Curtis strides toward the front porch of the first group home she lived in during her childhood, much of which was spent in foster care, there does not seem to be a hint of anger, melancholy or anxiety on her face or in her spirit. In fact, there is a sense of calm that exudes from her as she sits down on the front stoop of the home located in a quiet Northwest Baltimore neighborhood.“Sleeping with my clothes on because the group home mother’s sons kept calling me `fresh meat’ and made comments about coming in my room,” said Curtis via Facebook message regarding that chapter during her years in foster care. “It’s all beautiful,” she added, alluding to the rock solid faith that brought her through those challenging times and guide her today.Pamela Curtis is founder and president of Pushing the Vision Outreach. (Courtesy Photo)Curtis is founder and president of Pushing the Vision Outreach, a 501c3, non-profit (established Feb. 2010), she describes as a, “Multicultural organization that caters to the underserved communities in Baltimore City and surrounding counties, through mentoring, workshops for parents, financial counseling, empowerment events and the redevelopment of communities. I just want the forgotten to be remembered.”This week she is making the final preparations for her “Pushing the Vision Outreach Day” on Aug. 4, the day in 2016 former President Barack Obama, the state of Maryland and Baltimore City by proclamation recognized Curtis’ organization and her work. This year she chose the theme “The Rise of Kings” she says “to honor, appreciate and recognize men statewide.”Curtis’ event (which is also her 35th birthday celebration) will be at the Langston Hughes Business and Resource Center in her beloved Park Heights; the community she has adopted and works in. Curtis is the outreach coordinator for Park Heights Renaissance and she is also president of the Park Circle Community Association, the youngest community association president in Baltimore City. She is also the Park Heights neighborhood liaison for the Baltimore Police Department’s monitoring team (for the implementation of the consent decree) and Curtis, the mother of two teenage boys, is also a member of the Women’s Commission of Maryland.Her story is unique and perhaps implausible in the minds of some; a teenage girl who grew into young womanhood in Baltimore’s foster care system (she entered the system at 12, an aged out of it at age 21) to become an influential community leader at 35. Yet, she argues her star is rising as a leader not despite her past, but perhaps because of it.“I moved to Park Circle in Aug. 2017, by Dec., I was the president (of the neighborhood association).“(Park Heights) is a food desert and a desert as well. You remember growing up in Park Heights and you remember seeing the guys on the corners, or even people selling frozen cups, or someone selling something you needed for your household,” Curtis said. “But, to now drive and see the vacant houses or what used to be corner stores that you used to walk to to get penny candy or chips…but, now to see it in such a stage.” Where others see blight and despair Curtis sees opportunity and burgeoning pockets of beauty.“But, honestly, Park Heights is in such a transitional stage, it’s shifting…it’s transforming into something only a true visionary could envision, beautiful houses, homes,” she said.“Truth be told, those who focused on those houses being boarded up…no shade, but reality, those were the problem people. How can you see something broken or cracked and not want to be the solution and fix it? Because it takes one person.”Given what our city has gone through in the last three years since the death of Freddie Gray in police custody and the subsequent uprising in April 2015, it is easy to be cynical if you are a resident of Baltimore; it has been easier perhaps for people to pack up and head for the nearest, or farthest county. But, there are still true believers in this city; people who truly believe in the people of this city, Curtis is one of those true believers.“People are so quick to say, `Oh, you know, I want to move out of the city.’ But, it’s beauty in the city, it’s history in this city, there’s power in this city. Umm, there’s money in this city and that’s why outside developers are coming into this city, because they know it’s money. If you build it, they will come,” Curtis said.last_img
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