National Dialogue On Corporal Punishment

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppKINGSTON, March 7 (JIS): Minister of Youth and Culture, Hon. Lisa Hanna, says a national dialogue will have to take place before the country can make a decision on the issue of corporal punishment.Miss Hanna was addressing an Inter-Ministerial Working Group on Children, at the Ministry on March 6, which she convened to begin preliminary discussions on corporal punishment. “I could not take a decision on behalf of an entire country on what Jamaica is going to do without a national dialogue, before coming up with any concrete solutions as to the way forward,” the Minister told the meeting.She was making reference to a call from the United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child for the Jamaican Government to pass a law to ban corporal punishment. Miss Hanna, who chaired the meeting, said that studies have been done on corporal punishment by other countries; however, she noted that it is important “to look at how our population (think).” “So, what Switzerland does, what Dubai does is sometimes very different as to how we operate as a culture,” she said.Discussions also focused on issues pertaining to the Child Diversion Policy and the safety and protection of children.During the meeting, Professor of Child Health and Child Development and Behaviour, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of the West Indies, Mona, Maureen Samms-Vaughan, presented findings of a research done on corporal punishment.Among those attending the meeting were: Chief Executive Officer of the Child Development Agency, Rosalee Gage-Grey; Children’s Advocate of Jamaica, Diahann Gordon Harrison; Registrar of the Office of the Children’s Registry, Greig Smith, as well as representatives from the Ministries of Justice and National Security. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:jamaica, lisa hanna, national dialogue Two boys die, bicycle and van collide in St. Catherine, Jamaica Recommended for you Bahamas DPM Turnquest, as IDB Governor, Talks Technology and Climate Change Resilience at IDB Conclave Jamaica’s Senate Begins debate on National Identification and Registration Billlast_img read more

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Four arrested for guns and ganja

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppBahamas, March 21, 2017 – Nassau – Police say four other men are locked up for a string of incidents also from the weekend.  On Friday around 6pm Police were called to Fleming Street where a man was reported as firing of a gun in the area; officer say they saw when the man tried to get rid of the gun and then attempted to escape on foot.The gun, a 9mm Taurus pistol and 12 live rounds of ammunition was found and that man was captured and arrested.Around 3pm Saturday, two men on Crooked Island Street were arrested after a search of them turned up marijuana.  Later that same night in a separate matter on McCullough Corner, a man was arrested after a search revealed that he had marijuana too; he was said to have been acting suspiciously.  Seventy packets of the illicit drugs were found.#MagneticMediaNews#fourarrestedforgunsandganja#CrookedIslandmenarrestedforganja Related Items:#CrookedIslandmenarrestedforganja, #fourarrestedforgunsandganja, #magneticmedianews Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

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STATE REP RACE Dave Robertson To Hold Campaign Reception On October 3

first_imgTEWKSBURY, MA — 19th Middlesex State Representative candidate Dave Robertson (D-Tewksbury) is holding a campaign reception on Wednesday, October 3, from 7:30pm to 11pm, at the Tewksbury Country Club (1800 Main Street, Tewksbury). Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedALL POLITICS ARE LOCAL: Robertson & Gordon Endorse Ed Markey With Possible Kennedy Showdown LoomingIn “Government”STATE REP RACE: Tewksbury Republican Committee Attack Robertson Over Wilmington Democratic Committee Chair’s StatementIn “Government”STATE REP RACE: Candidates File New Campaign Finance ReportsIn “Government”last_img read more

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Dept Of Education Fail Teachers Lose Grants Forced To Repay Thousands In

first_imgKayana Szymczak and Sean Rayford for NPRThe TEACH grant helps teachers-to-be pay for college or a master’s. But many teachers, like Maggie Webb (left) and David West, say when they began teaching, they were forced to pay it back.America needs teachers committed to working with children who have the fewest advantages in life. So for a decade the federal government has offered grants — worth up to $4,000 a year — to standout college students who agree to teach subjects like math or science at lower-income schools.But a new government study, obtained by NPR and later posted by the Department of Education, suggests that thousands of teachers had their grants taken away and converted to loans, sometimes for minor errors in paperwork. That’s despite the fact they were meeting the program’s teaching requirements.“Without any notice, [my grant] was suddenly a loan, and interest was already accruing on it,” says Maggie Webb, who teaches eighth-grade math in Chelsea, Mass. “So, my $4,000 grant was now costing me $5,000.”Since 2008, the Education Department has offered these so-called TEACH grants to people studying to get a college or master’s degree. The deal is, they get to keep the grant money if they spend four years teaching a high-need subject like math or science in schools that serve low-income families.If they don’t keep their end of the bargain, the grants convert to loans that need to be paid back. But, the study finds, many teachers believe they kept their end of the bargain but are now being asked to repay that money anyway.Webb received a $4,000 TEACH grant, but, after she started teaching, she says, she ran into a problem. Each year, teachers have to send in a form to the Education Department certifying that they meet the program’s teaching requirements — or that they intend to. Recipients have eight years to make good on the program’s four-year requirement.But Webb says FedLoan, the company that the Education Department hired to manage the TEACH grants, never sent her the paperwork. Documents show she reached out to the department, on time, to ask for help. Despite the hiccup, Webb insists, she mailed a completed form within FedLoan’s annual certification deadline.“They said they never received it. So I sent it again,” Webb says. “By that point they said it was too late.”FedLoan converted Webb’s grant to a loan that she now has to pay back — with interest. At the time, she says, she was surprised. After all, she was meeting the grant’s fundamental service requirements: teaching a high-need subject, math, in a low-income school. That was never in doubt.“I knew I hadn’t done anything wrong,” Webb says, sitting at her kitchen table strewn with student homework that she is grading. “I knew I had done it right. And it was just so hurtful that they would do that.”Kayana Szymczak for NPRMaggie Webb, who teaches eighth-grade math, heads home from Clark Avenue School in Chelsea, Mass.Webb is among many teachers who say they feel betrayed — that the Education Department gave them this money. In exchange, they made life decisions about where to live and what to teach. And now, for a seemingly minor error — because Webb’s paperwork wasn’t received in time — the government wants its money back.According to this new government review of the TEACH grant program, Webb isn’t alone. In fact, the numbers are startling: 1 in 3 participants whose grants were converted to loans said they were likely or very likely to meet the program’s service requirements — or had already met them. Based on a representative survey, the report estimates it’s upwards of 12,000 participants.“I couldn’t believe it. I was flummoxed. I was floored. I was pretty upset by this,” says David West, who teaches high school in Lexington, S.C.West also had a paperwork issue with his TEACH grant. He mistakenly omitted a date and signature on his annual certification form. When he finally realized what he’d done, West says, he sent in a completed form.But by then his paperwork was past due. The company converted his grant to a loan. Furious, West repeatedly called FedLoan, assuming someone would be able to fix what he considered an innocent mistake.“I’m like, ‘Let me talk to your supervisor.’ ” But West says the person on the other end of the phone told him, “You can talk to who you want and there’s also an appeals process and you can try to appeal this if you want. But nobody ever wins.”Sean Rayford for NPRDavid West, an art teacher in South Carolina, is a recipient of a TEACH grant that has converted into a loan after he sent in a form with a mistake.West exhausted his appeals. He even wrote to his representative in Congress. But nothing’s changed. Money he was given to become a teacher has now become a debt.West and Webb have both signed onto a lawsuit against the Education Department.In Massachusetts, it has gotten the attention of the state’s attorney general, Maura Healey, who has heard from many teachers. “And for them to be actively sabotaged by a private company and our own U.S. Department of Education is just outrageous,” Healey says.Healey is suing FedLoan over its handling of the TEACH grant program and the far larger Public Service Loan Forgiveness program. She says the company, known as a loan servicer, and the Education Department have shown a callous disregard for the needs of borrowers.FedLoan declined an interview, but said in a statement that the company “does not agree with the allegations made by the Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office” and that it “remains committed to resolving outstanding borrower issues while following the U.S. Department of Education’s policies, procedures, and regulations as mandated by the Agency’s federal servicing contracts.”These problems were going on under the Obama administration, too, so there’s plenty of blame to go around. But Healey says the Trump administration is putting up new roadblocks that could stop the states from holding these companies accountable. Both the Education and Justice departments have argued that loan servicers like FedLoan should be protected from state laws and lawsuits.Some early red flags were raised a few years ago by the Government Accountability Office. The GAO investigated the TEACH grant program and noted that teachers were improperly having their grants taken away. At least 2,252 grants were erroneously converted to loans by the servicer.“Part of the problem here is that [the Education Department] does not really know, or they didn’t know at the time we did our work, why this was happening,” says Jackie Nowicki, who led the GAO study.That was the reason for this new government study: to understand why thousands of teachers who got grants to teach in low-income neighborhoods were getting them converted into loans, many of them improperly.The report found that many people in the program get tripped up on this annual requirement to submit certification paperwork. In a small but nationally representative survey, more than 30 percent of those who had their grants converted to loans said they either didn’t know they had to certify or found the process challenging.Another big reason, though, is tied to rising tuition. Millions of students are taking out loans from the government or receiving grants. And so the Education Department now finds itself running a trillion-dollar bank on the side. Critics say it’s not well-equipped to handle that, which is why the department has hired a handful of servicing companies, like FedLoan, to help.But Ben Miller, who studies higher education at the Center for American Progress, says these companies have very little incentive to put in too much effort — they get paid only a dollar or two a month per borrower.“If you don’t get paid very much, and you don’t feel like, ‘Hey, if I mess this up, the Department of Education’s really going to breathe down my back,’ the incentive to let things slide gets pretty high,” Miller says.In other words, organizations like FedLoan and the Education Department could be doing a better job of working with teachers who miss deadlines they don’t know about or have their paperwork denied because of a technicality.In a statement, the Education Department says the results of the study are concerning and that it needs to better understand why so many grant recipients aren’t making it through the program. “The study points to additional changes the Department can make that may benefit program participants, and we are committed to reviewing them,” the department says.The department also wants to be clear: It requires all TEACH grant recipients to complete an online counseling session each year explaining the requirements and, “once grant recipients start their service obligation period, the Department sends them multiple communications reminding them of the requirement to annually certify.”For her part, Webb, the Massachusetts math teacher, worries that she has no choice, at this point, but to make monthly payments on the loan she says she shouldn’t have to pay.“It just made me angry because I was working in a low-income school and I still am,” Webb says. “And I don’t know why I’m being punished for that. This is something to help teachers and instead they’re just kind of targeting them.”Or at least that’s what it feels like.There is one last, big takeaway reinforced by this new study. Experts say the grant program has deadlines and rules that are punishingly inflexible.If you’re late on your credit card, or your mortgage, you might pay $40 — not $4,000 or $5,000.But that’s what’s happening here. And teachers say they have no recourse.Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Sharelast_img read more

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Trading tales

first_imgThe Indian Institute of Foreign Trade commemorated its 52nd Foundation day at its New Delhi Campus. Professor Bibek Debroy, member, NITI Aayog, was the chief guest for the occasion. Surajit Mitra, director, IIFT, presided over the function. Mitra in his welcome address paid tribute to all its former and present faculty, employees and alumni of IIFT. Bibek Debroy in his keynote address, “IIFT — from now to where” dwelt at length on the challenges faced by the Indian and World economies and IIFT’s role in the changing global business environment”. Debroy also advised IIFT to play a substantially larger role in shaping trade policies and act as a think tank to all stakeholders.last_img

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How This Company Is Helping Entrepreneurs Use 3D Printing

first_img Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals March 2, 2015 This story appears in the March 2015 issue of Entrepreneur. Subscribe » 4 min read Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. Register Now » Chicago’s 3D Printer Experience is aptly named: It aims to educate and engage the public by offering a relaxed setting to learn about a beneficial new technology, as well as playful activities like the ability to scan and print one’s own head.  Founded as an LLC in late 2012 and converted to a benefit corporation in 2014, the 3D Printer Experience offers design and manufacturing services for both first-time and experienced entrepreneurs. Founder and CEO Julie Friedman Steele walked us through the process. Who is your ideal client?People who are driven by new ideas. We like to see clients who are ready to embrace change. Because not only do we focus on 3-D printing as a democratizing agent of manufacturing, but also on the effects of other futurist and open mindsets. The accelerating rate of technology is affecting our world in ways that most people aren’t even thinking about. Those things are going to radically change our world, and we want to make sure that as many people as possible get to be a part of that and understand what’s happening. My favorite ones are always the social entrepreneurs; not only are we helping them, but we are also making a difference in the lives of others. One company, Portapure, worked with us to create a piece of a water bottle with a filter inside to provide clean drinking water to people in Haiti.Julie Friedman SteelePhoto courtesy of 3dpxWhich of 3D Printer Experience’s services might be of specific interest to entrepreneurs?We offer consulting, which involves project feasibility and recommendations. We offer design and manufacturing. We have industrial-grade 3-D printing and laser sintering capabilities in-house. And we offer continuing education and private events. Our site functions as a full-service event space during hours not open to the public. Entrepreneurs love to have a place available to them that isn’t a typical banquet facility and to be around future technologies.Through our experiences, education, and ideation sessions, we work with many entrepreneurs to understand not only how 3-D printing functions today, but how it will impact our future as well. After working with us, most of our clients come back with even better ideas. Also, we are very encouraging to first-time entrepreneurs by supporting their ideas and by teaching them how to use 3-D printing to develop their concepts. My favorite thing to tell them is how 3-D printing is democratizing manufacturing. This means that they have the same access that large corporations have. Supply and demand: A sample of the variety of materials that can be used in 3-D printing.Photo (C) Kevin AntnenHow do your design services work?We take an individualized approach with our clients and are willing to go back and forth to ensure that the finished object exceeds their expectations. The steps we follow include ideation, 3-D modeling, prototyping, manufacturing and post-processing.Many clients are very sensitive about their intellectual property, and we make sure they get to keep that. We are in the business of helping them succeed, not putting up roadblocks that would prevent them from seeing their vision come to life.Is there anything about 3-D printing that you wish more entrepreneurs understood?I want more entrepreneurs to know that they can raise funds through means like crowdfunding and compete with the big guys. It’s hysterical to me to see publicly traded companies putting their projects on crowdfunding sites masquerading as independent entrepreneurs. However, it’s also very telling that there is slowly becoming very little difference between them and any entrepreneur with a new idea.I also let entrepreneurs know that if they love what they do, they don’t need to have an exit strategy. It’s possible now to launch financially sustainable businesses on their own and make an impact on the world. last_img read more

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