Sailors from USS Bonhomme Richard helping out in the community

first_img KUSI Newsroom, Sailors from USS Bonhomme Richard helping out in the community 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – U.S. Navy sailors from the USS Bonhomme Richard, an amphibious assault ship and the third American warship to bear the name, will hold a handful of community relations events throughout the county today to meet with members of the community.The Navy dubbed the day of events “13/13 Day,” representing the ships 13 departments doing 13 different events around the county.More than 1,100 sailors are expected to participate in the event to share their pride in serving on the USS Bonhomme Richard, which arrived in San Diego after spending six years based in Sasebo, Japan, and build a rapport with county residents.Six of the ship’s departments will hold beach cleanup events at Silver Strand, Mission Beach, Presidio Park, Pacific Beach, Coronado Beach and La Jolla Cove.Several departments will also hold cleanup events in Balboa Park and the Chula Vista Veterans Home. Two departments are expected to collaborate with Meals on Wheels and the Boys and Girls Club. Posted: May 15, 2019 Updated: 11:07 AM May 15, 2019 KUSI Newsroom Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter #BHR is taking over San Diego right now!! #RevGators from 13 departments are doing 13 community relations projects across the city at the same time!! Check out some of the photos! pic.twitter.com/or0paHJmBi— USS Bonhomme Richard (@LHD6BHR) May 15, 2019last_img read more

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Python snake catcher bags 18foot monster danger noodle

first_img 0 Post a comment Animals behaving badly amuse the internet Enlarge ImageSnakes alive, this python is a big ‘un. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission “Problem pythons” sounds like a great band name, but it’s a real issue for some areas of Florida. Burmese pythons are breeding and spreading across wildlife areas, including the fragile Everglades. The state now pays trappers to round up the large snakes, and one particular hunter just caught a doozy. Trapper John Hammond grabbed an 18-foot-long (5.5-meter) python this past weekend. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) shared a startling photo of his trophy on Facebook earlier this week. “During cooler months, people are more likely to see pythons during the day,” the commission wrote. Hammond, officially known as a Python Removal Contractor, snagged the snake in the Everglades Francis S. Taylor Wildlife Management Area near Miami. Burmese pythons can reach 20 feet (6 meters) in size. More nope-ropes The story didn’t end happily for the snake. FWC says pythons caught for the program are humanely euthanized. Hammond told Fox 35 he would use the snake’s hide after skinning it. The news station also reports the snake just set a new record for largest python caught as part of Florida’s removal program. The 150-pounder beat out a 17-foot, 120-pound snake snagged in November. It’s sad to see what happens to these majestic animals, but Florida is trying to control the invasive species, which is taking a serious toll on native wildlife.  The state even offers Python Patrol, a training program for private citizens that teaches them how to identify, capture and humanely kill the predators. Hundreds of the snakes have been removed since Florida started its python-control efforts. Tagscenter_img CNET’s Holiday Gift Guide: The place to find the best tech gifts for 2018.Taking It to Extremes: Mix insane situations — erupting volcanoes, nuclear meltdowns, 30-foot waves — with everyday tech. Here’s what happens. Share your voice Nest doorbell camera catches slithery snake on video Rare two-headed venomous snake offers double the nope 11 Photos Randomlast_img read more

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Researchers find evidence of earliest instance of parental care in scavenger beetle

first_img Sexual conflict affects females more than males, says new research on beetles This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Many species of scavenger or carrion beetles alive today exhibit instances of parental care—what they have in common are stridulatory files—finely ridged surfaces that are used for making sounds when some sort of scraper or plectrum is dragged across it—the most well known example of an insect with such structures in modern times are crickets. With modern scavenger beetles, the stridulatory files are located on the abdomen and are known to be used as a communications mechanism between adults and offspring—to warn of danger, for example, or to alert them to an action that should be taken, i.e. forms of parental care.In their studies, the researchers analyzed 37 silphid fossil specimens from two different biota environments across China and Myanmar including several that were preserved in amber. Using an electron microscope, the researchers analyzed the abdomens of the fossils and determined that specimens from 165 million years ago, did not have stridulatory files—suggesting they did not communicate with their offspring, and thus likely did little to care for them. Those that were 125 million years old, on the other hand, silphids of the Cretaceous, did have stridulatory files, which suggested they did communicate with their young, and thus likely offered some degree of care. More recent specimens, those from approximately 99 million years ago that were embedded in amber also had lamellate antennae, similar to modern burying beetles which suggest they likely were burying beetles as well—burying rodents or birds to provide food for their larvae.The researchers note that current theory suggests caring for young is likely a precursor towards social behavior—because of that, learning more about when caring for young evolved helps plot social evolution as well. More information: Early origin of parental care in Mesozoic carrion beetles, PNAS, Chen-Yang Cai, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1412280111AbstractThe reconstruction and timing of the early stages of social evolution, such as parental care, in the fossil record is a challenge, as these behaviors often do not leave concrete traces. One of the intensely investigated examples of modern parental care are the modern burying beetles (Silphidae: Nicrophorus), a lineage that includes notable endangered species. Here we report diverse transitional silphids from the Mesozoic of China and Myanmar that provide insights into the origins of parental care. Jurassic silphids from Daohugou, sharing many defining characters of Nicrophorinae, primitively lack stridulatory files significant for parental care communications; although morphologically similar, Early Cretaceous nicrophorines from the Jehol biota possess such files, indicating that a system of parental care had evolved by this early date. More importantly, burying beetles of the genus Nicrophorus have their earliest first record in mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber, and document early evolution of elaborate biparental care and defense of small vertebrate carcasses for their larvae. Parental care in the Early Cretaceous may have originated from competition between silphids and their predators. The rise of the Cretaceous Nicrophorinae implies a biology similar to modern counterparts that typically feed on carcasses of small birds and mammals. Silphids from the Middle Jurassic of Daohugou. Credit: PNAS, Chen-Yang Cai, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1412280111 (Phys.org) —A team of researchers with members from the U.S., Germany and China has found evidence of parental care in a scavenger beetle fossil dated back to 125 million years ago, making it the earliest example of its kind. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers describe their work in studying various beetle fossil specimens found in several parts of China and what they uncovered in doing so.center_img Explore further © 2014 Phys.org Citation: Researchers find evidence of earliest instance of parental care in scavenger beetle (2014, September 16) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-09-evidence-earliest-instance-parental-scavenger.html Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Scienceslast_img read more

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WB guv convenes allparty meet in wake of postpoll violence

first_imgKolkata: West Bengal Governor K N Tripathi has convened a meeting of major political parties on Thursday in view of the ongoing post-poll violence in the state, sources in the Raj Bhavan said. Tripathi has sent a letter to all prominent political parties in Bengal, urging them to attend the all-party meet at 4 pm at Raj Bhavan, they said. Welcoming the move, West Bengal BJP unit president Dilip Ghosh said the state government should have taken the initiative. “We welcome the decision. We have received Tripathi’s letter. We would be attending tomorrow’s meeting,” he told PTI. The Trinamool Congress leadership, however, said it was yet to receive any letter. “Once we receive the letter, we would take a call on it,” said a senior TMC leader.last_img read more

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