Oxford chancellor named Commencement speaker

first_imgTags: 2014 Commencement, Christopher Patten, Commencement Speaker, Hong Kong, Oxford University, United Kingdom Christopher Patten, Lord Patten of Barnes, chancellor of the University of Oxford and chair of the BBC Trust, will be the 2014 Commencement speaker, according to a University press release. Patten will speak and receive an honorary degree on May 18 at the University’s 169th Commencement.“Chris Patten’s global experiences and expertise — from higher education, to government service to the broadcast media — are remarkable and sure to resonate with our graduates,” University President Fr. John Jenkins said. “We have had the honor of hosting him on our campus in the past, and we are so pleased that he has accepted our invitation to return and address the class of 2014.”Courtesy James Yuanxin Li Patten, who was bestowed the title of baron in 2005, was elected chancellor of Oxford in 2003, and previously served as chancellor of Newcastle University. Queen Elizabeth appointed Patten in 2011 as chair of the BBC Trust, the governing body of the British Broadcasting Corp.Patten graduated from Balliol College, Oxford, where he studied history. He began his career in the Conservative Party’s research department, first as a desk officer and then as director. He was elected as a Member of Parliament for Bath in 1979 and served for 27 years as minister for overseas development in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and in the Cabinet as secretary of state for the environment.In July 2002, he was named the 28th and final governor of Hong Kong until its handover to the People’s Republic of China in 1997. In 1998 he chaired the Independent Commission on Policing for Northern Ireland for one year, set up under the Good Friday Peace Agreement, and from 1999 to 2004, was one of the United Kingdom’s two members to the European Commission.“One of Britain’s and world’s preeminent Catholics, Lord Patten was called upon by his government to help resolve some of the most daunting issues on the world stage, including his masterful governance of Hong Kong’s transition from British to Chinese rule, and his groundbreaking reforms of policing in Northern Ireland,” Jenkins said. “Many thought impossible the preservation of Hong Kong’s prosperity in the face of communism, just as others deemed unattainable police reform in a society so long divided by sectarian prejudice and violence.“Lord Patten proved the doubters wrong.”In 2010, the prime minister tapped Patten to direct the preparations for Pope Benedict XVI’s visit to the United Kingdom, the country’s first papal visit in almost 20 years. He has been recognized as one of Britain’s most influential Catholics.last_img read more

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City lining up Guardiola

first_imgSpurs have also done a deal for the new ground to host two NFL matches a season.They hope it’ll be ready by summer 2018. It’s believed Chelsea are standing by Jose Mourinho for the moment but will monitor Guardiola’s situation with the Spaniard set to make a decision on his future next week on whether or not he’ll stay at Bayern Munich.Meanwhile Tottenham’s new ground is a step closer after the club were granted planning permission for the project.It’ll hold 61,000 fans – making it the largest club stadium in London.last_img

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How many is too many? Grassley comments on Democratic presidential field

first_imgWASHINGTON — As another one of his U-S Senate colleagues joined the presidential race this morning, Iowa Senator Chuck Grassley responds to a prediction that as many as 30 Democrats will be running for the White House by the time the Iowa Caucuses arrive early next year.“I thought 17 were too many in the Republican primary four or three years ago and I think you can get too many,” Grassley says, “but in America, anybody can run for president.”Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders has added his name to the list for his second attempt at the presidency. Sanders, an independent, lost the 2016 primary to Democrat Hillary Clinton. Grassley, a Republican, applauds our governmental structure for choosing a national leader. “We have to have an open system so I’ll let the Democrats decide how many are too many or not enough,” Grassley says. “Don’t worry. It’ll sort itself out, for one will be, I guess, July or August will be their nominee.”Former Iowa Senator Tom Harkin ran for president in 1992 and was an early frontrunner before dropping out to back Bill Clinton, while current Iowa Senator Joni Ernst says she was invited to be President Trump’s running mate, an offer she declined. Grassley says he looks forward to the 2020 contest.  “Of course, being from Iowa and very proud of Iowa being first in the nation,” Grassley says, “and also because Iowa Democrats and Republicans cooperate on being first in the nation, I hope all 30 come to Iowa.”So far, at least a dozen Democrats have declared they’re running for president, six of them are U-S senators.last_img read more

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