Song by Notre Dame Folk Choir featured in ‘Lady Bird’

first_imgNotre Dame shares a connection with the five-time Oscar nominated film “Lady Bird,” as it features a song by the Notre Dame Folk Choir at the end of the movie.“Lady Bird” — which depicts the coming-of-age story of a girl as she attends a Catholic high school, fills out college applications, experiences her first love and navigates a tumultuous relationship with her mother — utilizes the song by the Folk Choir during a crucial point in the main character’s journey, choir director Karen Schneider-Kirner said.“The song is featured at the very end of the movie, when the lead character, played by actress Saoirse Ronan, has an awakening moment and realizes the gift of her family and mother in particular,” Schneider-Kirner said in an email.The song, Schneider-Kirner said, is “Rosa mystica,” a song from the Folk Choir’s 1996 album, “Prophets of Joy.” She said Trappist monk Fr. Chrysogynus Waddell composed the song as a hymn to Mary “with a text dating back to the 16th century.”Senior and choir president William Maher said part of the reason the scene in which the song plays is poignant is because the lyrics to “Rosa mystica” parallel the stage Ronan’s character has reached in her life.“The song, the lyrics themselves talk about changing and the transformation that happens when you accept Christ into your life,” Maher said. “Everything about it was just perfect.”Maher said “Rosa mystica” had a particularly significant meaning to the Folk Choir even before it appeared in “Lady Bird.”“It is definitely a song that we love to sing; it is something that we find really special as well,” he said. “When we are all together at our tours or social gatherings, we sing this song, and it was really special to see and hear that in the context of the movie.”Because the song holds such deep meaning for the choir, Schneider-Kirner said it was important for her and the rest of the choir to hear the song featured at what they believe is a pivotal moment in the film.“A large group of us went to see the film at [the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center] this past Saturday night,” she said, “It was a tear-jerker moment when I heard the song during the movie, as I’ve often directed that piece through the years during my [20-plus] years of association with this choir, and I knew the composer, who is now deceased.”Maher said it is unclear exactly how the production team of “Lady Bird” chose “Rosa mystica” to be in the movie, but he believes the piece must have touched them the way it touches the members of the Folk Choir.“We were just lucky in that we had this piece that we have been singing for decades now that they found to be appropriate,” Maher said.Schneider-Kirner said she is nearly certain there is some kind of Notre Dame connection within the production team of the movie. Either way, however, Schneider-Kirner said she is proud the Folk Choir could contribute to the film in this way.“The most rewarding part of this experience is being able to share this piece that we have long known and loved, appropriately dedicated to Our Lady, with a worldwide audience,” she said. “This was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for our choir.”Tags: coming-of-age, Film, Lady Bird, Music, Notre Dame folk choirlast_img read more

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Uruguayan Troops Close Military Base in Haiti

first_imgThe Soldiers then turned the Military base over to the United Nations in Haiti, which in turn donated it to the local government. MINUSTAH has helped Haiti cope with a variety of security and humanitarian challenges. For example, the mission played a key role following the January 2010 earthquake which registered 7.2 on the Richter scale — a temblor which killed between 160,000 and 220,00 people, including 96 UN peacekeepers, and damaged about 250,000 homes and 30,000 commercial buildings. As part of a plan to draw down the Military component of MINUSTAH, the Uruguayan Soldiers — “after eight years of outstanding performance” — permanently closed the Lieutenant Colonel Gonzalo Martirené Base located in the Mirebalais area on February 4. As of January 31, there were 1,459 Uruguayan Soldiers and police officers working on UN peacekeeping missions, including MINUSTAH, the United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUSCO), the United Nations Mission in Liberia (UNMIL), the United Nations Military Observer Group in India and Pakistan (UNMOGIP), and the United Nations Operation in Côte d’Ivoire (UNOCI), according to the Troop and Police Contributors report issued by the UN. Providing security Uruguayan Soldiers working with the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH) recently relinquished control of a Military base in the Caribbean nation. The closing of the Military base coincides with a reduction in the contingent of Uruguayan Troops in MINUSTAH. The country has contributed Troops and police officers to the peacekeeping mission since June 2004, and at one point had four bases in Haiti. In 2010, the South American nation had 1,200 Soldiers in Haiti; but in early January, Uruguay reduced its contingent of Soldiers in the mission from 700 to 250. “Currently, the Military component no longer plays a leading role. It has adopted a secondary role in support of the Haitian authorities’ actions on security, developing infrastructure, humanitarian actions and improving the living conditions of its population.” “In 2010, with the earthquake, the Military component [MINUSTAH] had to adapt its role to the new situation. It then began to prioritize humanitarian actions, rebuilding the country and improving the living conditions of the population – all of this without forgetting, of course, the security levels that had been attained,” MINUSTAH commander Lieutenant General José Luiz Jaborandy Jr., told Diálogo in January. Providing security MINUSTAH has helped Haiti cope with a variety of security and humanitarian challenges. For example, the mission played a key role following the January 2010 earthquake which registered 7.2 on the Richter scale — a temblor which killed between 160,000 and 220,00 people, including 96 UN peacekeepers, and damaged about 250,000 homes and 30,000 commercial buildings. Uruguayan Troops have contributed to MINUSTAH in a variety of ways, such as fighting gangs and common criminals, protecting and improving the environment, providing assistance to people who had to live in outdoor camps when the earthquake destroyed their home, and building new highways, according to Julián González, a researcher with the Political Science Institute of the University of the Republic of Uruguay. Other peacekeeping missions By Dialogo March 13, 2015 Haiti is not the only country where Uruguayan Troops are participating in international missions. Uruguay and Peru’s Soldiers are helping provide security and domestic order to the local civilian population as part of an effort by 21 MINUSTAH nations, who have provided more than 5,000 Soldiers at the request of the Haitian authorities. A reduction in Troops Haiti is not the only country where Uruguayan Troops are participating in international missions. The Soldiers then turned the Military base over to the United Nations in Haiti, which in turn donated it to the local government. In light of the dismantling of the Martirené Base in early February, the remaining 250 Uruguayan Troops in Haiti gathered in Morne Casse — where the country’s remaining base is located, and where they’re scheduled to stay until December 31. “Currently, the Military component no longer plays a leading role. It has adopted a secondary role in support of the Haitian authorities’ actions on security, developing infrastructure, humanitarian actions and improving the living conditions of its population.” Closing and dismantling the base was a protracted effort involving 80 Troops working night and day for 28 days. With the support of other contingents — such as the Bolivian Company (BOLCOY), the Brazilian Battalion (BRABAT), the Brazilian Company of Engineers (BRAENGCOY), the combined Chilean and Ecuadorean Company of Engineers (CHIECUENGCOY), the Guatemalan Company of Military Police (GUAMPCOY) and the Paraguayan Company of Engineers (PARAENGCOY) — they removed vehicles and packed sensitive equipment to return to Uruguay. Ninety percent of the Troops who serve in the Uruguayan Armed Forces have participated in a foreign mission at some point; the country has historically provided more Troops per capita for UN peacekeeping operations than any other. A reduction in Troops The closing of the Military base coincides with a reduction in the contingent of Uruguayan Troops in MINUSTAH. The country has contributed Troops and police officers to the peacekeeping mission since June 2004, and at one point had four bases in Haiti. In 2010, the South American nation had 1,200 Soldiers in Haiti; but in early January, Uruguay reduced its contingent of Soldiers in the mission from 700 to 250. In light of the dismantling of the Martirené Base in early February, the remaining 250 Uruguayan Troops in Haiti gathered in Morne Casse — where the country’s remaining base is located, and where they’re scheduled to stay until December 31. “In 2010, with the earthquake, the Military component [MINUSTAH] had to adapt its role to the new situation. It then began to prioritize humanitarian actions, rebuilding the country and improving the living conditions of the population – all of this without forgetting, of course, the security levels that had been attained,” MINUSTAH commander Lieutenant General José Luiz Jaborandy Jr., told Diálogo in January. As of January 31, there were 1,459 Uruguayan Soldiers and police officers working on UN peacekeeping missions, including MINUSTAH, the United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUSCO), the United Nations Mission in Liberia (UNMIL), the United Nations Military Observer Group in India and Pakistan (UNMOGIP), and the United Nations Operation in Côte d’Ivoire (UNOCI), according to the Troop and Police Contributors report issued by the UN. Other peacekeeping missions Ninety percent of the Troops who serve in the Uruguayan Armed Forces have participated in a foreign mission at some point; the country has historically provided more Troops per capita for UN peacekeeping operations than any other. As part of a plan to draw down the Military component of MINUSTAH, the Uruguayan Soldiers — “after eight years of outstanding performance” — permanently closed the Lieutenant Colonel Gonzalo Martirené Base located in the Mirebalais area on February 4. Uruguay and Peru’s Soldiers are helping provide security and domestic order to the local civilian population as part of an effort by 21 MINUSTAH nations, who have provided more than 5,000 Soldiers at the request of the Haitian authorities. “We will keep the Uruguayan Companies (URUCOY) grouped at the Batalla de las Piedras Base, always ready to nobly raise their flag wherever they are needed in the service of peacekeeping,” the Uruguayan Army reported in a statement. Uruguayan Soldiers working with the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH) recently relinquished control of a Military base in the Caribbean nation. Uruguayan Troops have contributed to MINUSTAH in a variety of ways, such as fighting gangs and common criminals, protecting and improving the environment, providing assistance to people who had to live in outdoor camps when the earthquake destroyed their home, and building new highways, according to Julián González, a researcher with the Political Science Institute of the University of the Republic of Uruguay. “We will keep the Uruguayan Companies (URUCOY) grouped at the Batalla de las Piedras Base, always ready to nobly raise their flag wherever they are needed in the service of peacekeeping,” the Uruguayan Army reported in a statement. Closing and dismantling the base was a protracted effort involving 80 Troops working night and day for 28 days. With the support of other contingents — such as the Bolivian Company (BOLCOY), the Brazilian Battalion (BRABAT), the Brazilian Company of Engineers (BRAENGCOY), the combined Chilean and Ecuadorean Company of Engineers (CHIECUENGCOY), the Guatemalan Company of Military Police (GUAMPCOY) and the Paraguayan Company of Engineers (PARAENGCOY) — they removed vehicles and packed sensitive equipment to return to Uruguay. last_img read more

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Credit union voter resources and information

first_imgAs we head towards Election Day, credit union voters across the country look to elect and re-elect credit union champions. In order to keep the credit union industry strong, check out these resources that can help you decide who to cast your vote for when the time arrives!Election Resources:Federal Election Commission – Primary DatesRock the VoteU.S. Election Assistance CommissionUSA.govVote.org – Absentee Ballot DeadlinesVote 411Credit Union Resources:CUNA – Credit Unions VoteCUNA – Member Activation Program (MAP)NAFCU – Grassroots Action CenterNAFCU – Federal AdvocacyNAFCU – 2020 Advocacy PrioritiesNAFCU – Key CU Issues We’re Bringing to The Hill ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img

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‘Football is in the blood of Kashmiris’ Says Sandeep Chattoo

first_imgSrinagar: I-League side Real Kashmir FC co-owner Sandeep Chattoo had an extensive meeting with envoys from the European Union and other countries, at present on a visit to Jammu and Kashmir. Participating in a round table conference on Wednesday, Chattoo gave a broad outline of the journey of RKFC and how it had engaged with the youth in Kashmir valley. “While many speakers ahead of me have spoken about many issues, I have a different narrative. The first and foremost being that of engaging with the youth of the valley and for that, I believe that sports is an umbilical cord which joins youth to the normalcy. I am proud to be the pioneer of such a club. IANSAlso Read: ‘Pele suffering from depression’ Says football legend’s sonAlso Watch: Six-mile to Ganeshguri Road Closed due to Overbridge construction; Public inconvenienced.last_img read more

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Super Bowl 53: Rams tackle Andrew Whitworth: ‘At the end of the day, we’re all gonna die’

first_imgThe four-time Pro Bowl selection was part of an offensive line that allowed the Patriots to sack Jared Goff four times. Super Bowl 53: Rams’ Sean McVay admits ‘I definitely got outcoached’ Rams tackle Andrew Whitworth had an interesting take on his team’s 13-3 loss to the Patriots in the Super Bowl.”At the end of the day, we’re all gonna die,” Whitworth said (via USA Today), when asked to summarize his feelings. Whitworth is a 13-year veteran who finished his second season with Los Angeles. He believes things other than winning and losing football games determine your true worth.“The way you carry yourself … is the only thing that’s going to matter. That’s what people are going to remember about you. For me, what means the most is guys seeing me hold my head up high, being confident in them and loving them,” Whitworth continued. Related News Super Bowl 53: Three takeaways from the Patriots’ win over the Ramslast_img read more

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