Team discovers new MRSA treatment

first_imgA team of researches led by Professor Shahriar Mobashery and Mayland Chang developed an antibiotic to combat Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, a strain of a certain species of bacteria that is resistant to a considerable number of conventional modern antibiotics.“MRSA is a multi-drug resistant version of a very common bacterium called staph aureus,” Mobashery said. “Staph aureus grows in our skin, grows in our noses, and has been with humanity for a very long time. However, this version, which is drug resistant, first appeared in 1962 in the U.K. and has become a global problem.”Mobashery said understanding the biochemical properties of MRSA that allow it to resist the effects of conventional antibiotics gave them valuable information and resources to develop an antibiotic to respond to the problem.“How does this organism have these biochemical properties that make it so difficult for treatment? That is a question my lab concerns itself with,” Mobashery said. “We want to understand the basis for the drug resistance this very difficult organism has developed over the many decades after its appearance.“When we understand some of the details of the biochemical event, can we subvert them in a way that leads to the demise of the organism? The answer to that question is yes, and we have come up with strategies that lend themselves to specifically addressing the methods that MRSA has devised for resistance,” he said. “We are actually able to take that and turn [them] around to … kill the organism.”Mobashery said finding and developing the drug to exploit the weaknesses he and his team found in MRSA was a massive computational undertaking, narrowing  over 1.2 million candidates to just 118 compounds.“1.2 compounds were so called ‘docked’ and ‘scored’ and … then, out of a collection of 2,500 compounds that had promise, we did some further analysis on which one of those were worthy of pursuit because not all of them were easy to synthesize. So we wanted to ideally buy some of these compounds,” he said.“We ended up choosing the 118 compounds … because they were commercially available and synthetically accessible.”Mobashery said the compounds were observed to effectively destroy MRSA in mice infected with the bacteria and that he saw a promising future for his work with the organism with the help of the University and collaboration with other researchers,” Mobashery said.“In principle, the University is very much interested in exploring whether companies will step up and move this class of molecules forward into clinical trials. That is something we won’t be able to do ourselves and we need partners and that’s a possibility. But research is ongoing on MRSA because of our broad interest in this organism and I’ve been at it for something like a dozen years and I trust that in a dozen years I’ll still be at it.”Tags: antibiotic, drug-resistant bacteria, Mayland Chang, MRSA, Shariar Mobasherylast_img read more

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Stratton owner makes deal with Sprint

first_imgIntrawest and Sprint (NYSE: S) today announced a new strategic alliance that will put Sprint’s mobile devices, voice plans and air cards in the hands of Intrawest’s staff at Copper Mountain and Steamboat Resort in Colorado. The new three-year agreement also gives Sprint the exclusive rights to promote, advertise and market their wireless products and services at all of Intrawest’s mountain resorts in the United States, including Mountain Creek in New Jersey, Stratton Mountain Resort in Vermont, Snowshoe Mountain in West Virginia and at Intrawest’s three Colorado resorts (Copper, Steamboat and Winter Park Resort).”Effective and reliable communications are critical to the success of Intrawest’s business at our mountain resorts,” said Andy Wirth, senior vice president of sales & marketing at Intrawest. “Not only has Sprint continued to be at the cutting edge of communication technology, they’ve also been a longstanding supporter of skiing through their work with the U.S. Ski Team at many of our resorts. We’re proud of this strategic alliance and look forward to cooperatively developing more programs that benefit our guests with Sprint.”Sprint will also serve as a presenting-level sponsor and associate-level sponsor at several key events throughout the year at Copper Mountain, Steamboat and Winter Park. These event sponsorships will provide Sprint with the opportunity to educate and inform resort guests on the benefits of Sprint’s wireless products and services through on-site promotions, event signage, print collateral and an online presence on each resort’s website.”Sprint’s association with skiing and snowboarding has been a central part of our business strategy for several years and our partnership with Intrawest is further proof of that commitment,” said Steve Gaffney, Sprint’s director of sports and entertainment marketing. “Intrawest is recognized for its guest-friendly resorts and its progressive use of Sprint’s wireless technology will enable staff and guests to access information quickly, and communicate with voice, text or e-mail almost anywhere on the mountain using Sprint’s Now Network.”Skiers and snowboarders will also be able to get up-to-the-minute resort information, weather, snow conditions, traffic reports and more with Sprint’s SnowZone, a wireless application available exclusively to Sprint subscribers. SnowZone also allows subscribers to watch video highlights of the U.S. Ski Team and U.S. Snowboarding during the season as well as the latest standings, results and team news.About IntrawestIntrawest is a leader in the development and management of experiential destination resorts. The Company has a network of resorts at North America’s most popular mountain destinations including Whistler Blackcomb, a host venue for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games and Canadian Mountain Holidays, the largest heli-skiing operation in the world. In addition, Intrawest markets and sells real estate at its resorts in North America. Intrawest is headquartered in Vancouver, British Columbia and is a portfolio company owned primarily by private equity funds managed by affiliates of Fortress Investment Group LLC. For more information, visit www.intrawest.com(link is external)About Sprint NextelSprint Nextel offers a comprehensive range of wireless and wireline communications services bringing the freedom of mobility to consumers, businesses and government users. Sprint Nextel is widely recognized for developing, engineering and deploying innovative technologies, including two wireless networks serving almost 49 million customers at the end of the second quarter of 2009; industry-leading mobile data services; instant national and international push-to-talk capabilities; and a global Tier 1 Internet backbone. The company’s customer-focused strategy has led to improved first call resolution and customer care satisfaction scores. For more information, visit www.sprint.com(link is external).Source: Intrawest. VANCOUVER and OVERLAND PARK, KS, Oct. 20, 2009 /CNW/ —last_img read more

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Owner of Brattleboro Reformer, Bennington Banner to file bankruptcy

first_imgThe owner of the Brattleboro Reformer, Bennington Banner and more than 50 daily newspapers across the country, including the Denver Post and San Jose Mercury News will file for bankruptcy protection. Affiliated Media, Inc of Denver has announced that it has obtained the approval of its lenders for a financial restructuring of the company that will sharply reduce its debt, boost its cash flow and allow greater financial flexibility.  The plan will be implemented in the near future through a “prepackaged” chapter 11 filing. This is a similar type of filing that FairPoint Communications recently undertook, in which it gives up most of the ownership of the company in exchange for significant debt reduction, but without a change in management.Affiliated Media is the holding company for the MediaNews Group family of newspapers, the nation’s second-largest newspaper publisher by circulation and owner of 54 daily newspapers, over 100 non-daily newspapers, as well as websites, television and radio broadcasters that serve markets in 12 states.Unlike other media company reorganizations, this one does not involve the newspaper operations or have any effect on employees or vendors of the newspapers.  Only the holding company will restructure. A letter to employees is attached to the end of this story.The reorganization, structured in consultation with the company’s senior lenders, provides for the swap by senior lenders of debt for equity, and reduction of the company’s debt of approximately $930 million to $165 million. There will be no management change or change in control of the company. William Dean Singleton, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of MediaNews Group, will continue to select a majority of the members on the Board of Directors. The Singleton led management will be authorized to own 20% of the company through stock and warrants. Singleton and company President Joseph J. Lodovic IV will control the company through their ownership of all class A shares of the company, which entitles them to elect a majority of the board of directors. Other stockholders will own class B and class C shares.  “In our search for a new model that reflects the realities of today’s changing newspaper environment, we have come up with a solution that restores financial strength and flexibility to our balance sheet,” said Singleton. “It does not affect the operations of any of our newspapers or vendors or other operations. It gives us one of the strongest balance sheets in the industry. It gives us breathing space to create a new model for the newspapers we publish.”Singleton added: “One critical advantage of our plan, compared with those by some other media companies, is that it is a prepackaged plan that has the approval of lenders and unlike other filings, this one does not involve our newspaper operations.”  He noted that the plan allows for claims of Affiliated Media’s trade creditors, suppliers and employees to be unaffected by the filing and paid in the ordinary course as they come due. Almost all of the company’s trade creditors, suppliers and employees are totally unaffected in any event since none of the individual newspaper operations are involved in the reorganization plan. “For them, it’s business as usual,” he said.  The company is current on all vendor payments, he said, and expects to remain so. He said the company has adequate cash to fund all its operations in a normal fashion.At present, senior lenders to the company are owed approximately $590 million, guaranteed by certain affiliates. The company also owes an aggregate principal amount of about $326 million to holders of subordinated notes. By accepting the prepackaged plan, senior lenders will trade their existing claims and guarantees for a pro rata share of the new secured term loan, in a smaller principal amount but with more collateral and a more financially sound borrower, as well as ownership of a majority of the new equity of the reorganized company, subject to a gradual dilution as a result of grants of restricted stock.  Subordinated note holders will receive warrants for future equity.  All existing equity interests in Affiliated Media will be cancelled.In contrast with most filings, where creditors may oppose the proposed plan for re-organization, a prepackaged filing means that affected creditors have already seen and accepted the plan prior to the time it is filed, so that it can proceed with little debate or negotiation, and can swiftly win approval from the court.The newspaper industry is undergoing a major transformation, exacerbated by the current recession, which is causing falling advertising, a slumping retail market and significant drops in classified advertising. About 80 percent of the company’s revenues are generated by advertising sales, and those sales will likely continue to be affected by the economic downturn. In recent years, the company has undertaken a number of strategic initiatives to improve operating cash flow and to reduce costs. But it became clear yesterday’s balance sheet couldn’t be sustained by today’s business environment.Even as the newspaper environment has badly deteriorated over the past three years, MediaNews newspapers have performed better than the industry as a whole.  Circulation of the company’s newspapers grew for the September Audit Bureau of Circulations 6-month reporting period, while industry circulation dropped 10.6 percent.  The growth included gains by the Denver Post after its primary competitor ceased publication.  Excluding the Denver gain, the company’s circulation dropped 4.8%, still well below the industry’s 10.6% decline.And the company’s innovative advertising sales initiatives have resulted in advertising declines lower than the industry as a whole. December quarter advertising results have shown substantially smaller declines than were experienced in the first nine months of the year.All but one of the company’s newspapers are profitable.”This reorganization does not come without pain,” Singleton said. “Current shareholders will be losing the value of their holdings. But we believe that adopting this plan will give us a far better platform from which to develop, grow and participate in the consolidation and re-invention of the newspaper industry.”Letter to Employees, from William Dean SingletonJanuary 15, 2009Dear MediaNews Group Employee:I have important and positive news about our company’s future.Today, our corporate holding company, Affiliated Media, Inc. announced that it has obtained the approval of its lenders on a financial restructuring that will sharply reduce debt, boost cash flow and give the company greater financial flexibility. The plan will be implemented in the near future through a “prepackaged” filing in United States Bankruptcy Court.Unlike previous filings by media companies, this one does not involve our newspaper or broadcast operations. Only our holding company, Affiliated Media, Inc., will be restructured. We expect all of our daily operations to continue without disruption, with employees receiving normal salary and benefits, suppliers being paid, advertising being placed and newspapers being printed and delivered as usual. No layoffs, sale of newspapers, facility closings or consolidations are anticipated as a result of the financial reorganization announced today.The prepackaged plan, structured in consultation with our senior lenders, is expected to reduce our debt of about $930 million to $165 million through a debt-for-equity swap by the senior lenders. The lower debt and interest payments will give us breathing space to create a new model for the newspapers we publish.There will be no management change or change in control of the company. I will continue as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of MediaNews Group and will continue to select a majority of members of the Board of Directors. Our management team will be authorized to own 20% of the company through stock and warrants. I and President Joseph J. Lodovic IV will control the company through our ownership of all of the company’s class A shares. Other stockholders will own class B and C shares.  Since our newspapers are not involved in this restructuring, you’ll see no changes in your operation. Our plan allows for trade and other business vendors to be paid in the ordinary course of business. The company is current on all vendor payments, and we expect to remain so. We have adequate cash to fund all of our operations in a normal fashion.Even as the newspaper environment has badly deteriorated over the past three years, you can be proud that MediaNews has outperformed the industry as a whole. Our total newspaper circulation grew for the September Audit Bureau of Circulations 6-month reporting period, while industry circulation dropped 10.6%. And our innovative advertising sales initiatives have resulted in advertising declines lower than the industry as a whole.  As you know, the December quarter has performed better than the first nine months of the year.  All but one of our newspapers are profitable.We expect to quickly emerge from our reorganization with one of the strongest balance sheets in our industry. This transaction gives us a far better platform from which to develop, grow and participate in the consolidation and re-invention of the newspaper industry.As our co-founder and chairman-emeritus Dick Scudder told me as we sought ways to ensure the company’s future, “This is not about you or me; it’s about our newspapers, our employees and the communities they serve.”I couldn’t agree more!I think all of us believe, with good reason, that a financially viable and independent free press is imperative for our country’s democracy. We who actually work in the newspaper business have a direct interest in keeping newspapers healthy. But we also can see that the communities we serve rely on newspapers, not only to keep everyone informed, and to check government and corporate abuse, but also to provide a cohesiveness that our society very much needs. Our nation was founded by men who recognized the indispensable role of a vibrant press in building a truly democratic society. That great insight, fought for and defended vigorously for over 200 years, is one of the reasons we emerged as the leader of the free world and became a model and inspiration for people fighting oppression all over the world. Yet many of our citizens now take it for granted, and forget how precious it really is.As you all know, the business model that has supported newspapers in past decades is now in the middle of wrenching change. There is still no clear or certain vision for our future, nor is there a consensus on how to approach it. But our company is making real progress as we rebuild an out-dated media model and I am confident that we can continue to do so.As your chairman, I am personally committed to working with you to define the future of the newspaper industry that you and I love so much. I thank you for devoting your lives to a cause that is so important to maintaining the standards and morals of our civilization.  There are those who believe that our re-invention of the newspaper model will not succeed.  I know it will, and I trust you do too.I look forward to working with you as we take our newspapers into a changing but successful new media world.Enclosed with this letter is the press release that we issued today with our announcement.   We will keep you informed as we move ahead.Sincerely,William Dean SingletonChairman and Chief Executive OfficerQ & A for Employees of MediaNews GroupWhat is the news?Affiliated Media, Inc., parent of MediaNews Group newspapers, has obtained the approval of its lenders on a plan to sharply reduce its debt, boost its cash flow and give it greater financial flexibility.  The plan will be implemented in the near future through a “prepackaged” filing in United States Bankruptcy Court in Delaware under chapter 11 filing.What is a prepackaged plan?All filings involve the preparation of a “plan of reorganization” which describes how the claims of each class of creditor and equity claim is to be treated, and must be approved by those creditors entitled to vote. A prepackaged plan is one where the “plan of reorganization” is prepared and approved by the creditors before the action is actually filed. Therefore, there is certainty about the outcome and the time within the process is greatly reduced, and could be as short as 60 days or less.In this respect, the AMI filing is a simple balance sheet restructuring to reduce debt.  None of the operating subsidiaries or partnerships are involved. Further, except for our financial creditors (our senior lenders and subordinated note holders who will trade debt for stock), all holding company creditors will be paid in full in the normal course of business so there will be no impact on operations.  What does this mean for our business?There will be no change in our daily operations.  The whole point of the transaction is to let us address our balance sheet issues – simply put, too much debt for existing conditions in the industry and the broad economy – while avoiding any disruption to our daily operations.Will there be layoffs?No. Our decisions about staffing have always been – and will continue to be – in response to business conditions, not our finances.  So while there is no guarantee that advertising or circulation won’t deteriorate further and force us to adjust accordingly, there are no layoffs planned as a result of our financial restructuring.  We’re committed to maintaining the staffing we need to serve our readers and advertisers.Will pay or benefits be affected?No. Unlike with previous filings by media companies, this one does not involve our newspaper or broadcast operations.  All benefits, including pay and pensions, will continue to be paid in the normal course of business.  Pension plans will not be affected as the company intends to continue its sponsorships of all current plans.  Only our holding company, Affiliated Media, Inc., will be restructured.  Will there be a change in management or in who controls our company?No. There will be no management change and no change in control. William Dean Singleton will continue as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of MediaNews Group and will continue to select a majority of members of the Board of Directors.  Our management team will be authorized to own 20% of the company through stock and warrants.  Mr. Singleton and President Joseph J. Lodovic IV will control the company through their ownership of all of the company’s class A shares.  Other stockholders will own class B and C shares.  Will this affect any of the company’s newspaper partnerships or joint operating agreements?No. Our partnerships and joint operating agreements are owned at the newspaper subsidiary level and all are debt free.  Those subsidiaries are not affected by this restructuring.Does this affect The Denver Post?No.  The Denver Post is party to its own bank credit agreement, which was successfully restructured on August 26, 2009.  The Denver Post is not involved in this restructuring.Are there plans to sell or close any newspapers?No. The company plans to use the current platform as a base for growing the enterprise.You’ve said the announcement is good news.  How does this help us?Our reorganization, structured in consultation with our lenders, is expected to reduce our debt from about $930 million to $165 million.  In exchange for extinguishing the debt, our senior lenders will receive stock representing a major ownership stake in the reorganized company. The lower debt and interest payments will give us breathing space to create a new model for the newspapers we publish. We expect to have one of the strongest balance sheets in our industry. This transaction gives us a far better platform from which to develop, grow and participate in the consolidation and re-invention of the newspaper industry.Aside from this transaction, how is our business doing?During an extremely difficult environment for newspapers over the past three years, MediaNews has outperformed the industry as a whole. Total circulation grew for the September Audit Bureau of Circulations 6-month reporting period, while industry circulation dropped 10.6%. Our growth included gains by the Denver Post after its primary competitor ceased publication.  Excluding the Denver gain, our circulation dropped 4.8%, still well below the industry’s 10.6% decline.  On the advertising side, the Company’s innovative sales initiatives have resulted in advertising declines lower than the industry as a whole.  The December quarter, while still down substantially, has performed much better than the first nine months of the year. All but one of our newspapers are profitable.What should I say to readers or advertisers ask about our filing?Let them know that this is a positive development that will make us financially stronger.  They should also understand that the financial restructuring is a non-event for readers and advertisers.What if I’m approached by the media regarding the filing?If you receive any inquiries from the media or other interested third parties, please refer them to Seth Faison at 212-573-6100.SOURCE Affiliated Media, Inc. DENVER, Jan. 15, 2010 /PRNewswire/ —last_img read more

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Top Leadership of “Alta Guajira” Criminal Gang Dismantled in Colombia

first_imgBy Dialogo August 11, 2011 Colombia’s Criminal Investigation Directorate and INTERPOL struck their most crushing blow against the “Alta Guajira” criminal gang upon arresting Johan Alberto Caldera, alias “Cobra,” the organization’s chief leader, and Luis Ignacio Suárez Rosario, alias “Pantera”, its second-in-command. According to investigators, “Cobra” inherited the criminal structure from Arnulfo Sánchez González, alias “Pablo,” the top-ranking leader of “Alta Guajira,” who was arrested by the Colombian National Police in November 2010 in Bogotá. “Cobra” took control of guarding, warehousing, transporting, and embarking the narcotic substances shipped by drug cartels to the United States, the coasts of the Dominican Republic, and Costa Rica. For that purpose, he relied on alias “Pantera,” who was in charge of the drug stashes and of hiding the drugs until the vessels sailed for their final destination. “Pantera” was also responsible for administering all the criminal organization’s military material. At the same time, he extorted funds from retailers and threatened the indigenous population so that they would not be betrayed to the authorities. The “Alta Guajira” criminal organization is active in the municipality of La Uribia and neighboring areas. During the operation, the investigators seized 8 rifles, 12 fragmentation grenades, 22 40-mm grenades, 7 mortars, 4,807 cartridges, 162 rifle magazines, and 3,200 kilograms of marijuana. “Cobra” was recruited at the age of 14 by the militias of the then-active United Self-Defense Units of Colombia. He started off as a foot soldier in the organization and worked his way up the ranks to become the right-hand man of Rodrigo Tovar Pupo, alias “Jorge 40.” Johan Alberto Caldera emerged as the highest-ranking leader of the “Alta Guajira” criminal gang following the arrest of the group’s head, Arnulfo Sánchez González, alias “Pablo,” late last year in Bogotá.last_img read more

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June 1, 2005 News and Notes

first_imgJune 1, 2005 News and Notes News and Notes Lewis B. Freeman received the 2005 Henry King Stanford Alumnus of the Year Award from the University of Miami. Barbara A. Eagan of Broussard, Cullen, DeGailler & Eagan spoke at the Orange County Medical Society/Florida Medical Association, Environmental Section Annual Earth Day Symposium: The Environment and Our Community. Bradley P. Blystone of Mateer Harbert was named chair of the board of directors of the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Central and Northern Florida for 2005-2006. John A. Grant, Jr., with Akerman Senterfitt was elected chair to America’s Board of the United Bible Societies. Glen J. Torcivia presented information regarding the Sunshine Law, the Public Records Law, and the Code of Ethics For Public Officials, to a group of elected officials and advisory committee members at the Florida League of Cities/Institute of Government Advisory Board Training Session for the City of Lake Worth. Tammy de Soto Cicchetti was selected Business Woman of the Year for 2004 by the National Republican Congressional Committee. She was also selected to participate in President Bush’s 2005 Tax Reform Workshop and join members of Congress for dinner with the president. Christopher M. Shulman of Tampa was awarded diplomate status in The Florida Academy of Professional Mediators. Gregory Mitchell was named The Florida State University College of Law’s Sheila M. McDevitt Professor of Law. Andrew P. Rock of Kingsford & Rock presented a workshop titled, “Appraisal Provisions in Property Policies” at the PLRB/LIRB 2005 Claims Conference in San Antonio, TX.Former Judge Steve Rushing was appointed by the Hernando County Commission to the Hernando County Fine Arts Council. Brian L. Tannebaum of Miami was elected president of the Miami Chapter of The Florida Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers. Michael Goldstein of Akerman Senterfitt addressed members of the Georgia Black Mayors organization on the topic of brownfields restoration and reuse. Beth Houghton was re-elected chair of the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute Hospital Board. Sidney A. Stubbs of Jones, Foster, Johnston & Stubbs was the recent recipient of the Palm Beach County Bar Association’s Professionalism Award. Janet C. Moreira of Lott & Friedland was a panelist at the 20th annual Winter Music Conference. Moreira discussed copyright issues in the digital age, including peer-to-peer technology, copy protection technology, licensing preferences, fair use, and international piracy issues. Darin I. Zenov of Buchanan Ingersoll received the “Put Something Back” Pro Bono Service Award from the 11th Judicial Circuit and the Dade County Bar Association. Paul Steven Singerman of Berger Singerman in Miami served on the faculty of the 31st Annual Southeastern Bankruptcy Law Institute Seminar held in Atlanta, GA. Donald Slesnick II, mayor of Coral Gables, was awarded the University of Florida College Of Design, Construction and Planning’s Beinecke-Reeves Distinguished Achievement Award. John W. Kunberger was honored by the Unemployment Appeals Commission under the Agency for Workforce Administration for his 15 years of service with the organization and his dedication to community service. Robert Rhodes, Audrey McKibbin Moran, and Barbara “Babs” Suddath Strickland are members of the inaugural board of trustees for Florida Coastal School of Law, part of the InfiLaw consortium of law schools. Paul A. Giordano of Fowler White Boggs Banker in Ft. Myers was recently elected the president of the Ft. Myers chapter of the Coastal Conservation Association. George W. Bush, Jr., of Fox, Wackeen, Dungey, Beard, Sobel and McCluskey was notified by the Legal Aid Society of Palm Beach, The Florida Supreme Court, and the Florida Pro Bono Coordinators Association that he is the recipient of a special commendation for his pro bono work in the year 2004. Juliette E. Lippman of Brinkley, McNerney, Morgan, Soloman & Tatum was appointed to the board of directors of the Unicorn Children’s Foundation. Bruce A. Blitman of Ft. Lauderdale was approved as a volunteer instructor for Florida Atlantic University’s Small Business Development Center. He presented “The Mediation Advantage: Getting Ahead by Getting Along in Business.” Additionally, Blitman presented, “Paralegals’ Primer: 10 Ingredients for a Successful Mediation Process” to the Broward County chapter of the Paralegal Association of Florida. Martin E. Segal of Sacher, Martini & Sacher wrote a book titled Preventative Law for Business Professionals published by the Thomson / South-Western Company. J.B. Harris of Motley Rice met in Dallas with business managers from the Southwest Regional Council of the Sheet Metal Workers International Association to discuss Vioxx pricing and welding rod litigation. Christine Rieger Milton of Jacksonville was recently elected to the board of directors of Baptist Medical Center Downtown. Patricia H. Thompson of Carlton Fields in Tampa was elected to the board of directors of the American College of Construction Lawyers. Bob Panoff of Miami was an invited guest and private sector conferee at the three-day U. S. Tax Court Judicial Conference in Farmington, PA. David Pratt of Pratt & Bucher in Boca Raton spoke at the Jewish Federation of South Palm Beach County Professional Advisory Committee Roundtable; his topic was “Estate Planning in the Current Environment.” Additionally, Pratt was the speaker at the West Broward Estate Planning Council where his topic was the “Anatomy of the (New) Federal Gift Tax Return.” Bob Wesley of Orlando was named the 2005 recipient of the Orange County Bar Association’s Liberty Bell Award. Carlos A. Kelly of Henderson, Franklin, Starnes & Holt was published in Opposing Viewpoints — Censorship. The article is an excerpt from Kelly’s previously published article, “The Pen is Mightier than the Sword or Why the Media Should Exercise Self-restraint in Time of War.” Dorothy Sims of Sims, Amat, Stakenborg, and Henry has recently presented lectures on cross-examining medical experts to organizations throughout the U.S. Additionally, Sims was honored in the Workers First Watch l0th Anniversary Special Edition magazine with a reprinting of her article on cross examining the psychiatric expert as one of the best articles written over the past 10 years. Jeff Vastola of The Law Offices of Vastola & Associates in West Palm Beach was re-elected to serve a third term as president of the Connor Moran Children’s Cancer Foundation in Palm Beach County. Deborah Martohue of Hayes & Martohue in St. Petersburg was elected vice mayor of St. Pete Beach. Jason R. Maughan of Sanibel Island was voted by the readers of the Island Reporter as the best attorney on Sanibel and Captiva Islands for 2005. J. Thomas Cookson, Daniel Jacobson, and William P. Heller of Akerman Senterfitt in Miami were honored at the 2005 “Best of the Bar” Breakfast hosted by The South Florida Business Journal. Robert L. Case of Stovash, Case & Tingley in Orlando was elected to the board of directors of Michelee Puppets, Inc. Tim Bailey will be installed as president of the Broward County Bar Association later this month. Robert Josefsberg spoke to the members and administrative assistants of the South Miami Kendall Bar Association on “Civility and Professionalism.” Dolores Henriquez co-coached the Henry W. Grady High School Mock Trial Team to win the Georgia State High School Mock Trial Championship at the Gwinnett Justice and Administrative Center. John D. Emmanuel of Fowler White Boggs Banker in Tampa was re-certified by the American Board of Certification in business bankruptcy law. Cynthia Crofoot Rignanese of Polk County presented “Advance Directives in Light of Terri” to the Florida Gulf Coast chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association. June 1, 2005 News & Noteslast_img read more

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Lyon shooting: Suspect admits attacking priest ‘over affair’

first_imgIt was initially feared that the wounding of an Orthodox cleric in Lyon was a terror attack.- Advertisement –last_img

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Perry defeats Allderdice to remain undefeated in closed gym

first_imgby Malik VincentPerry did what they needed to do to leapfrog the defending City League champion Allderdice.They beat them, at home, last Wednesday 74-67 behind senior guard Marcus Smith’s 22 points. In the process, they became the only team left in the City League with an undefeated 7-0  record.“Our team has been working really hard lately,” Perry coach Marco Corona said. “We have a lot of seniors and our goal is to obviously win the City and gain some momentum, heading toward the State playoffs.”Allderdice’s Justin Dobbs scored a game-high 23 points. Ben Mickens and Cameron Bailey were also in double-digits with 15 and 11, respectively.“Allderdice is a very tough team,” Corona added. “They won the title last year. This year, we have increased from two seniors on our roster to five. We look at it as our last opportunity at glory and they’re chomping at the bit that they don’t let it pass us by.Christian Perkins and Bruce Grover rounded out players for Perry in double-figures with 17 and 11, apiece.There were no fans, supporters, student section, or community—an odd occurrence at first glance. Last year’s game at Perry high school was packed to capacity, but this time around, the Commodores’ coach Marco Corona said that “25 people were there, tops.”Sources indicated that after the Perry and Carrick game that was played on Jan. 18, there were shots fired in the neighborhood of the North side school.“Some people thought that the person who fired the shots was at the Carrick game,” said Perry senior forward Greg McGhee. “I don’t think that is the case though.  I think it was someone else who wasn’t even there.”His coach, Corona, has a similar view.“I just think it was someone from around the neighborhood,” he said. “I honestly don’t think it had anything to do with our school in any way.”Nonetheless, school officials made the decision to close the game to the general public because of what Corona says was a “precautionary measure.”“It was our first night game of the year at home and I think that they just wanted to take precaution to the possibility of any problems,” he said. “They want everybody to be safe.”“They wouldn’t even let our dance team into the game,” McGhee said. “It felt very different to play under those circumstances.”A member of the band, honor roll student, and vice president of Perry’s class of 2011, Tiysha Harris really expected to be able to cheer her Commodores to victory.“It was really hurtful whenever (the administration) told us that we could not attend,” Harris, who attends every home game, said. “They were concerned about our safety and I respect that. But I’m not sure if I agree with not letting us be there. We care about the team. Maybe they could have moved up the time or something.”She also pointed out that she believes the shooting happened somewhere on Perrysville Avenue, not in the general area of the school, itself.“Perrysville is a long street,” she said. “It didn’t seem like it was that close.”(Malik Vincent can be reached at malikvincent@gmail.com.)OTHER GAMES:The games that were scheduled last Friday were all postponed and were rescheduled for Feb. 9.Wednesday, Jan. 191. Peabody beat Langley, 59-44, behind a game-high 16 points by Ted Bell. Dameon Arrington and David Brown were also in double-figures with 12 and 10, respectively. Michael Williams led Langley with 11 points.2. Schenley survived Carrick, 59-50. Brandon Johnson led all scorers with 18 points. Arthur Smith and Aaron Gale added on 16 and 10, each. Mike Talton and Lance Archer had 15 and 10 for the Mustangs.3. Westinghouse snuck past Oliver, 41-39, for its first conference win of the season. Gary Herndon (12) and David Pryor (10) led the Bulldogs. Devin Lyles had 18 to lead the Bears.STANDINGS:Team    Conf.    Ovr.1.    Perry    7-0    10-22.    Allderdice    6-1    8-43.    Schenley    6-2    9-54.    Carrick    5-2    7-45.    Peabody    3-4    4-56.    Brashear    2-5    3-97.    Westinghouse    1-6    3-98.    Langley    1-6    1-129.    Oliver    1-6    1-12GIRLS RESULTS:Wednesday, Jan. 191. Allderdice crushed Perry, 76-34, behind a game-high 24 points by Janay Bottoms. Three others were in double-figures for the Dragons: DaJai Beasley (15), Ashley Cox (14), and Lanise Saunders (14). Marritta Gilcrease led the Commodores with 16.2. Langley ousted Peabody, 48-34. Kayla Bartok and Jordyn Cunningham each led the Mustangs with 13 points. Semaj Pamplin and Teauthay Littleton had 11 and 10, respectively.3. Schenley pounded Carrick, 52-8. The Raiders didn’t score at all in the second half. Carla Reed and Taylor Smith each put up 20 points for the Spartans. Sara Nielson led Carrick with 6 points.4. Westinghouse cruised past Oliver, 58-32. Jasmine Myers (20), RoiShay Myers (14), and Kayla Key (12) each had double-digits for the Bulldogs. Tay’Rah Scott had 12 to lead the Bears.STANDINGS:Team    Conf.    Ovr.1.    Allderdice    7-0    9-32.    Westinghouse    6-1    9-43.    Brashear    5-2    6-44.    Perry    5-2    5-85.    Schenley    4-4    4-86.    Langley    3-4    6-57.    Carrick    1-6    1-88.    Peabody    1-6    1-99.    Oliver    0-7    1-9(Follow our continuing coverage and add your comments to our website at www.newpittsburghcourieronline.com.)last_img read more

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