Prime Minister gets update on Baha Mar 50 occupancy 75M in bookings

first_img Baha Mar gets green light from PM Christie Recommended for you Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppBahamas, July 20, 2017 – Nassau – Baha Mar started accepting bookings on May 8th and now the resort is reportedly at 50% occupancy, and that is thanks in large part to the Commonwealth Youth Games where 1300 delegates are in country.   Baha Mar president Graham Davis was giving PM Dr Hubert Minnis a tour and an update and media was there.In statements following the Tuesday tour, it was explained that 2100 Bahamians are working at Baha Mar and the figure is expected to soar to 4,000 by the end of the year with the opening of the SLS lux brand.   SLS is scheduled for opening late October, early November which is the start of a high long stay arrivals tourism season.Davis said after 60 days of opening, the Baha Mar resort can boast of having $75M in bookings for definite and tentative stays and he described the staggered opening of the resort, on target.#MagneticMediaNews#BahaMarNassauBahamas#75millioninBahaMarbookings Related Items:#75millioninBahaMarbookings, #BahaMarNassauBahamas, #magneticmedianewslast_img read more

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Exxon Valdez litigation ends but spills legacy may be indefinite

first_imgNearly three decades after the disastrous Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989, the litigation for the remaining cash the state and federal governments could pursue from Exxon is at an end. A clause in the 1991 settlement said up to $100 million could be requested from Exxon for future unknown damage. It was called the re-opener.Download AudioExxon Valdez tanker aground. Off-loading of remaining oil in progress. Photo courtesy of the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Trustee Council.In 2006, then-Governor Frank Murkowski and the George W. Bush administrations went to court and demanded $92 million of the re-opener from Exxon. The company refused to pay. And in October, the Walker and Obama administrations decided to drop the claim.Former Marine biology professor Rick Steiner has been involved in the fight for compensation from Exxon since the spill. He says there’s no other recourse now.STEINER: In the end it’s kind of a bitter pill at the end of this long string of bitter pills that we the people and the injured environment have suffered through for the last quarter of a century here.Seafood processors picketing and protest at Exxon’s headquarters. Their signs read, “Exxon, don’t be lame, honor the cannery claims.” Photo: Alaska Office of the Governor. Accessed via Alaska Digital Archives.TOWNSEND: Was the re-opener language written in a way that made it sort of impossible to look at it in broad enough terms to say, ‘Well, there might not be lingering effects to this particular species… but certainly to this particular species.STEINER: The government attorneys — that’s the state attorney general’s office and the U.S. Dept. of Justice — assert that the re-opener language in the original settlement was so narrow that it was difficult to activate the claim later on down the road. However, if that’s the case, then that was a fraud initially in the settlement in 1991.TOWNSEND: Have we, as a nation, at least learned some lessons that are being applied going forward when there are these kinds of disasters?STEINER: I would hope that some of the lessons of the Exxon-Valdez and how to manage a disaster like this were applied in the Deepwater Horizon (spill). I was down there working on Deepwater Horizon for several years and some of those lessons were applicable — certainly the re-opener, that the debacle of the Exxon re-opener in Alaska foretold how to do it better in the BP Deepwater Horizon case. And so they did not allow BP any control over these future expenditures. Some of these lessons were applied. What were not, however — for years we pushed for a comprehensive scientific overview, or an audit, of the restoration process. Over the entire Exxon-Valdez, how restoration funds were spent — scientifically, for research, for habitat… what the difference between Exxon results were from the government research results — which were dramatically different… and the agencies opposed that. Many of the injured habitats and populations have not fully recovered. Some are listed as ‘not recovering at all,’ here 26 years later. Those include herring, pigeon guillemots, marble murrelets and the AT1 killer whale pod, which is actually expected to go extinct due to losses from the oil spill.TOWNSEND: Does it feel strange to be at the end of this decades-long fight?Exxon Valdez oil is transferred to the Exxon San Francisco. Photo: U.S. Coast Guard, 17th District, Photograph Collection. Accessed via Alaska Digital Archives.STEINER: Yeah, it does. You know, there were thousands of us who were involved in this in 1989 — actually before 1989! We saw there to be a risk for this sort of thing. Even a couple of years prior to the Exxon Valdez we tried to set up an RCAC (regional citizens advisory council) in Prince William Sound, which I still to this day believe that if we’d been successful, we would’ve seen the holes in the system and might not have ever had the Exxon-Valdez. But, there’s still more work to be done — both on lingering oil and on these larger habitat deals Bering River, Kenai Fjords, the subsurface deals in Prince William Sound and more ongoing monitoring and research that needs to be done. That will go on indefinitely. And we hope the habitat deals will get done this year. So while it’s over in one sense, it will never be over in another sense — simply from the fact that there will never be full recovery from the Exxon-Valdez oil spill. The other thing we’ve learned from this is how delicate these pristine coastal ecosystems can be to (recover) from one day, one wrong decision by a tanker captain. Here we are, 26 years later, still dealing with the fall-out from that, and still possibly with residual oil on the beaches that could be there for centuries. I guess that take-home message is, if we’re going to do these large-scale, risky developments in precious coastal areas, we have to do it with exceptional care. We aren’t there yet. We didn’t do it with the Arctic drilling (in the Chukchi) last summer, you know. Hopefully those lessons will be applied somewhere in the future. So we’re at the end of part of it… but in an interesting way, it will never be fully over.Rick Steiner is a marine scientist and longtime critic of the Exxon Valdez settlement terms.last_img read more

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Harlem Park Rec Center Reopens

first_imgBy AFRO StaffOn Aug. 13, the Baltimore City Recreation and Parks (BCRP) reopened  the popular Harlem Park Recreation Center, at 700 N. Calhoun St., in West Baltimore. The reopening of Harlem Park brings the city’s rec center total to 44.In collaboration with the University of Maryland Medical Center, the center has been restored and renovated to include new lighting, books, games and sporting equipment, an upgraded multipurpose room, among other updates. Community members, partners and members of the press were among the attendees at the grand reopening. This is the first time the Harlem Park Recreation Center has operated since its closing in 2012.<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>“Returning this essential community asset to the residents of Harlem Park has been a priority of mine since I was City Council President and I am proud that as Mayor I will be able to return this jewel to the community,” said Mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young. “This new facility will be a gathering space for the neighborhood and a safe haven for its youth. Reflecting my commitment to rebuild our neighborhoods and provide positive recreational engagement for our residents.”Pop-up programs will take place beginning Aug. 14 and the center will operate Monday’s, Wednesday’s and Friday’s 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesday’s and Thursday’s 5-9 p.m. The center will be fully operational beginning September 2019 with youth and adult programs, volunteer opportunities, sports leagues, out-of-school learning, summer camp and much more. Starting Labor Day Weekend, all city recreation centers will operate Monday through Saturday.Harlem Park Recreation Center, Baltimore, MD (Screengrab YouTube) “The restoration of this center has been a long time coming,” said Reginald Moore, executive director of Baltimore City Recreation & Parks. “We’ve listened to the surrounding communities to not only bring back the Harlem Park Rec Center, but to provide recreational opportunities tailored to their needs. We are thankful to partners like the UMMC for the importance of enriching our communities through recreation and working alongside our dedicated staff to bring back one of its community staples.”last_img read more

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A blast from the past

first_imgThe plays in the second week of Bharat Rang Mahotsav seem to have been painted in vivid colours. The first few days showed metaphysical themes and legends, where as plays staged mid week gave a history lesson to the audience. On Wednesday, five plays were staged. The play Balkan Women takes us to the time in history when Yugoslavia was undergoing partition. A bloody civil war was taking place between Christians and Muslims in Bosnia. Amina and her daughter Samira are interrogated by Lt. Blako, a Muslim-hater and subordinate of col. Herak who had once been involved with Amina and was Samira’s biological father. Worried about her daughter’s safety, Amina asks Herak for help and he employs Samira as a housekeeper at his residence. Over time the two develop a warm relationship, until one day Samira receives news about the brutal killing of her father and brother, and other atrocities against the Muslim community. To avenge this, she gives poisoned coffee to col Herak. Amina tells a shocked Samira that col Herak is her biological father. A repentant and grieving Samira is looked upon as a daughter by a dying col. Herak. Both mother and daughter are later killed by the new chief of the camp. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Assamese play Nokiyampo was set in the Tirap District of Arunachal Pradesh, where there is a tribe called Nocte. In the recent past the Noctes had a unique marriage tradition in which before marriage young girls had to prove their fertility by giving birth to a child by co-habiting with a male member of their society. After the child was born, as per their rituals, it was killed and the girl was given in marriage to someone chosen by the members of society and the family. This tradition continued among the Noctes until 1962, when for the first time such a child was allowed to be brought up in the society in lieu of fine imposed by the society. Despite this, the unmarried mother and child had to face various socio-religious difficulties because of the customs and rituals of the tribe. This is the situation that Nokiyampo aims to recreate and explore. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixSet in the backdrop of Ramayana, play titled Indrajit  is a chapter from the battle between Ram and Ravan. On hearing about the death of both Kumbakarnan and Ahthigayan, Ravana vows revenge. Mandodhari, Ravana’s wife enters receives the news of her son’s death. She mourns and asks Ravana not to wage war against Rama, but he doesn’t listen to her. She then tells her son Indrajit to stop his father, and Indrajit tells him that he will go to war field instead of him.  When Rama comes to know that Indrajit is coming to wage war against them he sends Lakshmana to face him. The performance looks at events as they enfold, from Indrajit’s putting of Brahmasthiram on Lakshmana, the episode with the Sanjeevi leaves, Indrajit’s Nikumbala Yagam, and finally his death at the hands of Lakshmana. The play, Thana Theke Aschhi which sees sub-inspector Teenkori Halder come knocking of industrialist Chandra Madhab Sen’s door to enquire about the suicide of a girl, unfolds a day ahead of Modi’s trip to the city to address a business meet. Based on JB Priestley’s famous play, An Inspector Calls, Thana Theke Aschhi has been adapted for both stage and celluloid before. The backdrop of the play is 2013. Set in a family of industrialists, it also shows how Modi’s visit gets the business circles buzzing. With an eye on next year’s parliamentary elections, the businessmen are seen excited about the prospect of meeting Modi –the poster boy of development. What is unveiled through the play is the insecurity of working in the private sector. The girl, who takes her life, was also faced with a similar crisis.Play, Untitled Phrase-02 is about parallel structures and their chaos are being questioned, broken and rebuilt repeatedly at every moment in our understanding and in our way of dealing with them. That is why they have the possibility of unpredictability and remain a source of potential hope of us.On Thursday three plays were staged, Hayavadana, A Kind Of True Story and Dharti Aaba. The  play Hayavadana, concentrates on the theme of ‘incompleteness’ and the superiority of mind over body.The human desire for completeness represented by Padmini ends in a fiasco as the transposition of heads gradually proves that it is the mind that rules.  After the transposition at the Kali temple, complications arise.  Initially, Devadatta, or rather the head of Devadatta, on Kapila’s body combines with it and reverts to his nature, while the other combination is  Kapila’s head and Devadatta’s body. But there is a difference.  Devadatta stops writing poetry while Kapila is haunted by the memories in his body.  Padmini, after the exchange of heads, feels that she has the capacity for complete experience.The play, A Kind of Love Story traces a year in the lives of eight people living in Mumbai. Their story is told from the perspective of the struggling writer, Sameer Sheikh, who is writing a script about these eight characters, including himself. It explores the characters’ interpersonal relationships, as well as their personal and professional struggles on a daily basis. The story is set in a middle class suburban building society that is going through the process of redevelopment.The structure of the play is non-linear with a mix of real and unreal situations. The play deals with the groups’ perception of ‘reality’, as ideas are broken and bared intermittently, until the audience is left questioning and revisiting truths usually considered absolute.The music is a mix of Western and Indian; there is live singing on stage and actors speak in both Hindi and English.‘I will return…soon I will return from my forests, on my mountains…I will return again amidst my Munda people…we have primeval blood. This is the blood of black people. It has been made by the coming together of hunger, accusation, insult, pain, ands sorrow. It from this blood that the fire of ulgulaan burns. This fire will never stop burning…never. I will return soon.’ This dialogue by BirsaMunda is the crux of DhartiAaba, which is based on the life and works of BirsaMunda, the leader and hero of the Munda tribal community.Birsa’s life was full of struggle. He first left school in protest against the derogatory treatment meted out to Munda students by the missionaries. Constantly troubled by the problems of those living in the forests, he eventually succeeded in taking his fellow community members towards a better socio-religious situation. Gradually he was able to instill the hunger and confidence to resist the feelings of slavery that the Mundas had internalized within themselves. Under his leadership the already existent rebellion of the Sardar Mundas was transformed into a struggle against foreign rule.last_img read more

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Low sunlight exposure increases cancer risk

first_imgPersons residing at higher latitudes, with lower sunlight exposure and greater prevalence of vitamin D deficiency, are at greater risk of developing cancer, including leukemia, a type of blood cancer, new research reveals.Analysing data on leukemia incidence rates in 172 countries, the researchers found that people living in higher latitudes are at least two times at greater risk of developing leukemia than equatorial populations.“These results suggest that much of the burden of leukemia worldwide is due to the epidemic of vitamin D deficiency we are experiencing in winter in populations distant from the equator,” said Cedric Garland, adjunct professor at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine in the US. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Leukemia rates were highest in countries relatively closer to the poles, such as Australia, New Zealand, Chile, Ireland, Canada and the United States. They were lowest in countries closer to the equator, such as Bolivia, Samoa, Madagascar and Nigeria, the findings showed. “People who live in areas with low solar ultraviolet B (UVB) exposure tend to have low levels of vitamin D metabolites in their blood,” Garland said. “These low levels place them at high risk of certain cancers, including leukemia,” Garland noted.The findings were published online in the journal PLOS One.last_img read more

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