Dorms begin to decorate for Christmas season

first_imgIt’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas on campus. Though there may not be snow on the ground, many dorms have already begun to get into the Christmas spirit by decking the halls with unique decorations.Rosie LoVoi From the outside, passersby can see Breen-Phillips Hall’s Christmas spirit shining through candles in the windows that are put out every year after Thanksgiving, Ashley Huffman — Breen-Phillips’ president — said.However, Breen-Phillips residents get more excited about competitive holiday-themed section decorating, Huffman said.“Each section will choose a theme, and everyone in the section decorates the whole hallway with that theme,” Huffman said. “We have judges come in and pick a winning section. … This year, we’re announcing the winner at a Christmas Party.”Past themes have included “Creaster” (a blend of Christmas and Easter), Harry Potter and naughty and nice. Most of the decorations are handmade, Huffman said.“The candles look really pretty when you see them on the quad, but [it’s] especially the decorations in the sections people really like,” Huffman said. “It’s cool to see, but it’s also cool to see all the sections because all the girls can work together and have fun doing that together.”Pasquerilla West Hall celebrates the holiday season with a tradition not to be found anywhere else on campus: a lighting and decorating ceremony of the bush located in the center of the roundabout in front of the dorm.“We have the ugly bush lighting ceremony every year around Christmas time,” Allison Huffman, Pasquerilla West’s president, said. “Everyone stands in a circle around the ugly bush, and we count down to the lighting of the bush. Once the lights are plugged in, everyone sings our ugly bush song to the tune of ‘O’ Christmas Tree.’ After singing, we go inside and have a memory night and look at all of the pictures from the past semester.”This year, Pasquerilla West will light the ugly bush Tuesday.“The ugly bush is unique to PW, so I think that a tradition only we have makes the girls in PW feel special and connected to something,” Huffman said. “It is also just a weird tradition, but it is fun and brings us all together.”The McGlinn shamrock shines as the dorm’s own Christmas star for the Christmas season. The shamrock was made by a student around 10 years ago to rival O’Neil’s signature “O wreath,” McGlinn president Madeline Petrovich said.“Around 10 years ago, a girl in McGlinn actually made it when she wanted to put something up for Christmas,” Petrovich said. “She made it with wires  and put the lights on. I guess it fell apart, but the workers who put it up fixed it, and they still put it up every year. … It goes up every year around Christmas.”Though the shamrock, made of garland, wires and lights in the shape of a giant shamrock, isn’t a traditional Christmas symbol, it has become one for the dorm over the years, Petrovich said. This year, the shamrock will be put up on Dec. 5.“Most people really appreciate it when you’re walking back from the library at an ungodly hour for finals and you turn around the corner on South Dining Hall and you see it,” Petrovich said. “It’s very nice, kind of calming. You’re like, ‘Alright, it’s Christmas.’”Tags: christmas, decorations, dormlast_img read more

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Top Adventure College Tournament – Final Round

first_imgWhat’s the best outdoor school in the Southeast and mid-Atlantic? We’re asking you to decide! The Blue Ridge Outdoors Top Adventure College Tournament puts colleges and universities in head-to-head matchups. The 32 schools were selected for their outdoor clubs and curricula, commitment to the outdoors and environmental initiatives, the quality of their outdoor athletes and programs, and their opportunities for adventure. Each week winners advance to the next round.Will your alma mater take the tournament crown?Vote Now: https://www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/best-adventure-school/last_img

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Colombian Troops Shut Down FARC Rebel Hospital in Bogota

first_img BOGOTA — Government forces have succeeded in closing down clandestine FARC-run hospitals in the Colombian capital, and dismantling a section of the guerrilla’s support network otherwise referred to as Redes de Apoyo al Terrorismo (RAT). Two nondescript brick houses, in Bogota’s working-class district of Usme were put under surveillance by the National Police’s Criminal Investigation and Interpol Directorate (DIJIN) in the weeks leading up to the operation, known as “Republica 130.” DIJIN officers observed injured combatants being brought for treatment and recuperation to the house, which was run by FARC nurses known by the aliases of Tatiana and Viviana. “These women used their knowledge, working in a building that was conditioned not only as a depot for medications but also as a clinic to attend to injured guerrillas and for their rehabilitation,” said DIGIN’s director, Gen. Carlos Ramiro Mena. The raid followed an announcement Feb. 26 that the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia would no longer kidnap civilians for ransom. But Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos has insisted that the FARC stop the practice of kidnapping and all other acts of terrorism before the group begins peace talks with his government. Last November, government troops killed Guillermo Leon Saenz Vargas, also known as Alfonso Cano. FARC’s supreme commander, who was 63, died in a shootout in the mountains of Cauca department, in southwestern Colombia. Shortly after, President Juan Manuel Santos called Cano’s death “the most devastating blow this group has suffered in its history.” Under the command of Henry Castellanos Garzon, known as Romana, guerrillas wounded in action in the department of Meta — located south of Bogota with access to vast Sumapaz National Park — would be brought to Usme. There, the rebels, affiliated with FARC’s Ariari Front, would be nursed back to health. In early March, 12 members of the RAT support network were captured, and a small factory that produced military uniforms identical to those used by government troops was seized. These uniforms are said to have then been shipped south into conflict zones, where FARC militants — disguised as government troops — would set up false roadblocks near military installations for kidnapping and extortion purposes. While these raids in Usme and Meta have yielded significant successes, the information gathered in the operation serves to remind civilians and the government how close the FARC is to Bogota and the ease with which their rebels can reach the city. The district of Usme has long been problematic for Bogota’s police, as it backs onto a large, open high-altitude steppe just 19 miles from the capital. With altitudes ranging from 4,920 to 14,300 feet above sea level, and with entry points that descend from the Andean cordillera into lowland jungles of the departments of Meta and Huila, this is a tricky region to patrol — a fact not lost on Romana and FARC Secretariat member Mauricio Jaramillo, alias El Medico. Romana, who still eludes security forces, was right-hand man to Jorge Briceno Suarez, alias Mono Jojoy, the FARC’s former military commander. Mono Jojoy was killed in a September 2010 attack in Meta. Romana now oversees the same area as his former boss, and in turn is highly active in coordinating the so-called “urban militias” of the rebel group as well as supervising the transport of weapons, munitions and explosives into Bogota. While Romana remains at large in Meta, DIJIN forces did manage to capture a guerrilla subversive by the name of Jaider Henao Naranjo, alias Diego Guapuchon. In a press statement, DIJIN’s Mena said this subversive was “directly in charge of coordinating the trafficking of weapons, munitions and explosives for this organization into Bogota, most of which were negotiated through the sale of coca in various outlying areas of the town of Mesetas [in the department of Meta].” In a twist that shows the importance of the police and military operation, Naranjo — captured alongside his brother, Alexis Henao Naranjo — has direct links to Mauricio “El Medico” Jaramillo, the FARC secretariat member in charge of mobile guerrilla units. With the capture of these urban militias of the FARC, police say they have closed an investigation that has run since November 2011, when a grenade was detonated in northern Bogot·, given that Mono Jojoy, Romana and Guapuchon were among top FARC leaders with expertise in explosives. I believe we have to be very alert of President Chávez, because of all the public statements that he has delivered supporting the FARC for quite some time. Those who call themselves democratic with 7 foreign bases, in their own country. These are the real networks supporting UNIVERSAL terrorism. They use them to eliminate the ones that oppose their businesses of narco trafficking and laundering of their dollars, they are the mercenaries of their primary project, assassins. It is a shame that the people of Colombia are so poor and that misery leads them to sell their dignity. It is no secret that the guerrillas are in Venezuela, eating well. They are not at the foot of the Commander This writer Luis Morillo is a disgrace. His opinions about the leader of the Bolivarian revolution, a clean man, clear in his ideas, thinking and people. Surely Mr. Morillo unpatriotic. It is a shame of the Colombian drugpolitics. Uribe represents the most rotten of this policy. WE SHALL LIVE AND WE SHALL WIN! Very Interesting It is time that the PT from Brazil also closes offices and stops supporting those terrorists. Hypocrites! I want to be part of many of the fellows who are looking for a change for our country Good By Dialogo April 09, 2012last_img read more

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MBB : Raising his game: Jackson ‘makes name’ by becoming premier big man in final season at SU

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on March 8, 2011 at 12:00 pm Commentscenter_img When his son was 11 years old, Rick Jackson Sr. took him to play Philadelphia basketball. It’s a different brand, a different style of play that hardens and toughens those who participate. Rick Jackson found that out soon enough.Rick Sr. watched as his son played against 16- and 17-year-olds in Philadelphia’s Chew Playground on 18th Street and Washington Avenue, near the family’s house.The younger Rick went up for a rebound. Soon, he met two elbows. One in the chest. One in the face. Knocked back, lip bleeding and flustered, the gangly preteen version of today’s Jackson sheepishly looked at his father.‘That’s the way you’re going to have to play,’ Rick Sr. told his son. ‘It’s hard. But you have to play that way.’The next play, Rick Jackson’s look turned to one of determination. He gave a shot right back at a player inside. Countless elbows, scratches and swings followed through the years. Jackson never looked at his father after another one of them. And he never looked back.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAs No. 11 Syracuse prepares for the postseason — which starts Thursday at 2 p.m. in Madison Square Garden with the quarterfinals of the Big East tournament — Jackson is the reason this SU team goes in primed to build off two straight Sweet 16 performances.Once an afterthought among Top 10 recruiting classes and loaded teams, Jackson quickly rose to become the conference’s top inside player this season. His path there was unlikely. But through what his closest friends and family say is a penchant for hard work, determination and that toughness, Jackson got to where he stands today.‘He’s the best two-way player in the league when you look at defense and offense,’ SU head coach Jim Boeheim said last week. ‘He’s by far the most influential player.’The ‘moment’Jackson’s ‘moment’ came with a trip to the doctor’s office.His moment was nothing like Andy Rautins’, who grew up with a Syracuse pedigree imitating famous basketball players on a Toys ‘R’ Us hoop. Jackson wanted to play football.Nothing like Arinze Onuaku, who displayed super strength as a child when he lifted a nine-pound milk jug at 10 months. Jackson was long and lean.So for Jackson, the moment that would influence the rest of his basketball career happened in a cramped Philadelphia hospital patient’s room. A simple checkup turned complicated when his doctor said Jackson was growing too fast. He wanted to give him a shot to slow his growth.Worried, his mother, Joyce Thomas, considered the option.‘Listening to this doctor, I got scared,’ she said. ‘I was saying, ‘OK. It’s not good? Slow it down then.”But when Rick Sr. heard of the possibility, his son said he ‘freaked out.’ At the same time, Dad put things in perspective. Rick Sr. stood at 6 feet 5 inches. His father was 6 feet 7 inches. No need to rush to a decision that could affect the rest of his son’s life.‘Here I am,’ Rick Jackson said. ‘Six-nine. It all worked out. I’m just glad that didn’t happen.’Rick Sr. put a basketball in his son’s hands at the age of 7. Four years later, he started playing in playground leagues. That’s about the time he met Scoop Jardine, who would become his point guard to this day.Together, they strayed from the path that took many of their friends to life in the streets, jail or worse. Together, they stuck to basketball. Together, they made a promise soon after they met.‘He kept saying it,’ Thomas said of her son. ‘‘Me and Scoop, me and Scoop. We’re going to the same college. Me and Scoop, me and Scoop.”The SummitThe 6 a.m. wake-up call came every day during the summer between Jackson and Jardine’s freshman and sophomore seasons at Neumann-Goretti High School.Sometimes, Aaron Abbott slept on Deborah Jardine’s floor to make sure her grandson Scoop and Jackson got up. Sometimes, Abbott, a Neumann-Goretti assistant coach, left his own house early to gather two or three other players in addition to the two Neumann-Goretti budding stars.Either way, they crammed into his burgundy 2000 Ford Taurus every morning by 6:30 and drove to The Summit, a training center.‘You didn’t want to do it,’ Jackson said. ‘It was almost a job. I hated it. But it made me better.’That summer, Jackson became the beast that eventually got noticed by the likes of Connecticut, Wake Forest and, of course, Syracuse.The routine was always the same. Get to The Summit by 7 a.m. Train for three hours. Lift for two more before grabbing lunch. Then back after lunch to repeat.‘It would be maybe four or five guys in my little car,’ Abbott said. ‘Rick was the biggest, of course. But they’d always fall asleep.‘We spent a lot of time sleeping and eating in that car.’Abbott called him ‘Rookie.’ Still does. That freshman season as an assistant at Neumann-Goretti, Abbott made ‘Rookie’ carry around the seniors’ travel bags. At the end of practices, he dumped and scattered basketballs all throughout the gym and made ‘Rookie’ pick every single one up. He never complained.He built confidence then. He built confidence over the summer. And after those 10-hour work days, Jardine and Abbott said Jackson, who played sparingly in his freshman season at Neumann-Goretti, knew he was going to start.Soon after, as a sophomore, he won the job over a returning starter and senior.‘After our freshman year, he made up his mind that he was going to start,’ Jardine said. ‘I remember the hunger that he had that sophomore year. … I’m not going to lie. He really blew up, and he became a totally different player.’In his junior season, he and Jardine went head to head with Kevin Durant’s Montrose Christian team. Abbott remembers pulling Jackson aside midgame with a simple message.‘You’re playing like a punk,’ Abbott told him.The next play, Jackson — who is bigger and stronger than Durant — finally went up strong to the hoop in Durant’s face. Later, he put in a hook shot that put Neumann-Goretti up for good.‘He played like a monster,’ Abbott said. ‘He really took over the game. From that moment on, I knew he really wanted it.’‘The one guy you can’t take off the court’Mike Hopkins offers apologies to Syracuse guards Jardine and Brandon Triche and to forward Kris Joseph. That’s because to Hopkins, SU’s assistant coach, Jackson is the one player this Syracuse team can’t afford to lose.‘He’s the one guy you can’t take off the court. Ever,’ Hopkins said. ‘You have a lot of guys — if Scoop got hurt, or Brandon — they’re unbelievable players. … But he just means so much to what we do.’This season, Jackson has once again become the leading man at his program. In 31 games, Jackson averaged 13.1 points and 10.7 rebounds per game. He became a double-double machine.By the end of his freshman season at Syracuse, Jackson played single-digit minutes as the Orange limped to the NIT for the second consecutive season.‘By his sophomore year, he was ready to be rotting on that bench like a lot of players do,’ Thomas said. ‘He kept nagging Boeheim. He kept telling him, ‘Give me a chance. You keep yanking me out. You don’t even give me 15 minutes. Give me a chance to show you what I can do.”He finally got his chance his sophomore year against Memphis — albeit as a result of Eric Devendorf’s suspension. But for Hopkins, the game signified Jackson’s arrival.But Jackson had trouble staying in games. He played more than 30 minutes in just five of SU’s 31 regular-season games in his junior season. He struggled mightily in extended minutes in both Syracuse’s Big East tournament loss to Georgetown and its NCAA Tournament shocker to Butler, as SU played without its senior center Onuaku.Boeheim routinely pulls players aside in the locker room after games to point out individual successes or flaws. This one, though, Jackson didn’t quite expect. A few feet away from a sullen Onuaku, Boeheim sent his future star big man a message.‘We’re going to need you next year,’ Boeheim told him. ‘AO’s going to be gone. I need you to be the physical player that you can be — a guy that can go and rebound and bang for 40 minutes. I need you to be in shape to be able to play 40 minutes and just be an animal around the basket.’Within a couple of weeks, Jackson dumped cakes and cookies from his diet. He went back to the routine Abbott taught him. He shot hundreds of 15-foot jumpers, adding a new element to his game.It showed in perhaps the most important moment of the regular season at Connecticut, one of 13 games in which he’s played 38 minutes or more this season. The Orange was a loser of four straight.Minutes earlier, Jackson was embarrassed on a block by UConn’s Alex Oriakhi. With time winding down in the half, he took it right back to the teeth of the Husky defense. He pulled up for a hook shot, giving SU a 26-25 lead. It gave Syracuse its first lead in 133 minutes and 44 seconds of game time.‘The one thing about Ricky that’s huge is his consistency,’ Hopkins said. ‘He’s been consistent day in and day out. All. Year.’Making his nameWhen Thomas finished her daily 10-hour days as a SEPTA bus driver, she would come home and play basketball with young Rick. One on one, Mom usually won.‘You can’t beat your mom?’ Thomas teased her son. ‘You’re garbage!’For years, Jackson waited for revenge. Needless to say, Thomas can’t compete anymore. Last time they played, in a schoolyard across from their home, she laughed as Jackson dunked on her.‘That’s just the way he plays,’ Thomas said. ‘He’s going to want to play better no matter who he’s playing.’Last Saturday, Thomas and Rick Sr. watched that mentality in action from the stands as their son dominated on a Senior Day reserved solely for him. They stood by him as he received a plaque with a jersey that bore his number. They watched as he came out of a game for the final time at the Carrier Dome. They listened as the crowd chanted, ‘Thank you, Jackson!’For Jackson and Syracuse, his brand keeps the story going.‘I’m trying to make a name for myself,’ Jackson said. ‘A lot of guys come to college, and they’re just players. They don’t make a name for themselves. I don’t want that. I want to take over.’bplogiur@syr.edulast_img read more

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