Meet the Commissioners Selecting Candidates for SFs New Police Chief

first_imgThe Commission has in the past been criticized for backlogs of disciplinary cases.In its June report, the Blue Ribbon Panel on Accountability, Transparency, and Fairness found that the commission is grossly understaffed. In fact, just two people are on staff to assist the Commission with administrative matters.In recent months, members have been putting in overtime as the Commission spearheads the search for the city’s next police chief. With the help of a hiring firm that scoured some 61 resumes, the commissioners are now tasked with interviewing and vetting the candidates, before narrowing the pool of applicants down to three.  These names will be passed on to Mayor Ed Lee, who will ultimately appoint the new chief, in the coming weeks. The applicants’ names have not been made public and will not be released until a chief is chosen.  Here is some background on the commissioners.Photo by Lola M. ChavezSuzy Loftus, PresidentAppointed by Mayor Ed Lee in 2012Suzy Loftus has served as the Commission’s president since 2014, leading the panel through a time of growing community discontent after several high-profile police shootings.Since the December 2, 2015, police shooting of Bayview resident Mario Woods, Loftus has faced hostile crowds at community meetings. Meanwhile, she said, she has attempted to find a middle ground between police and community demands as the Commission signs off on policy reforms such as a general order regulating the use of force. “What we are endeavoring to do is reject this idea that [we are] either on the side of the police or the community,” said Loftus. “The police need a great relationship with the community, and community members want a great relationship with the police. We are endeavoring to build that.”Loftus called her role as commissioner a “full-time job” that often competes with her two other full-time jobs — she is the mother of three and general counsel to the California Department of Justice.   Loftus previously worked for Attorney General Kamala Harris and served as San Francisco’s district attorney.The monthly stipend allocated to the commissioners, she said, is a humbling reminder of “why we are here.”“We are doing this is a public service,” Loftus added.  As the commission’s president, she said she is often expected to put in over time. She is married to Tom Loftus, who works for San Francisco Government Television. She also shares her last name with former San Francisco Deputy Chief of Police John Loftus, her second cousin through marriage. The 41-year-old said she often finds herself clarifying the connection.  Loftus said her only connection to the police force is through her years of serving as a prosecutor. “People think that a prosecutor is closely affiliated with the police but it’s often – as you’ve seen in SF with our current district attorney — a tense relationship,” said the San Francisco native who currently lives in the Sunset. “You need to ask for things, you need to have an excellent product. You need to be sure there is integrity in the investigation.”Photo by Lola M. ChavezJulius M. Turman, Vice PresidentAppointed by the Board of Supervisors in 2011Current Police Commission Vice President L. Julius M. Turman has served on the commission since 2011 and is a labor and employment lawyer by day. Turman said he has no ties to the police department, but has a background in drafting and implementing policy as well as knowledge of labor standards and discipline that qualify him for the Police Commission.Turman attended law school at Rutgers University before clerking for Judge John J. Hughes in the district court of New Jersey. Turman then worked as Assistant U.S. Attorney for five years in New Jersey.“There is a significant crossover between what I do as a professional and what I do here at the police commission,” said Turman, now a Potrero Hill resident. Turman said he became involved with the Commission because he wanted to be involved in the “process to make change for the better,” adding that the current Commission “has fired more police officers for misconduct than any other commission.”In the search for a police chief, Turman said that he is looking for a reformer who will implement the recommendations made by the Department of Justice, the Blue Ribbon Panel, and the Office of Citizen Complaints. “I want someone who is going to come in and make widespread changes in a department that has existed for 150 years,” he said.Photo by Lola M. ChavezPetra DeJesus, CommissionerAppointed by the Board of Supervisors in 2005San Francisco native Petra DeJesus, who grew up in Bernal Heights where she currently resides,  became the first Latina on the Police Commission.A full-time attorney with Kaplan Law, she represents blue-collar workers and their families who have fallen ill or died due to asbestos exposure. DeJesus called her 10-year run on the Police Commission a “huge commitment.”In light of the ongoing search, DeJesus said that several meetings “have gone to midnight or one in the morning, and we are meeting outside of [regular] meetings with community.” Following a scathing review of the police department by the Blue Ribbon Panel that found systemic bias and a federal report that found the same, DeJesus has called for overhauls to the system — including the commission. “Maybe we should be more of an appellate board [and] just have hearing officers that … are actually employed,” said DeJesus in response to criticism by the Blue Ribbon Panel that the Commission is understaffed. She added that the panel’s semblance of being part of the police department — “we are on their website” — doesn’t help in reassuring the public that the Commission’s role is to hold the department accountable. “Right now perception is everything,” she said. “We are supposed to be independent, but the perception to the community is that we are not.”DeJesus started her career in poverty law, representing low-income individuals at the California Rural Legal Assistance, Mission Community Legal Defense, and the San Francisco Public Defender’s office.She served as senior trial attorney for the Public Defender’s office for over a decade before accepting a position as general counsel for EMT Entertainment network, supervising the startup’s legal matters. DeJesus’s younger brother, Luis DeJesus, is a police officer. The San Francisco Chronicle reported in 2005 that Luis DeJesus was among more than a dozen officers who were implicated in shooting unauthorized videos that were later posted on the internet .  DeJesus said she was new to the Commission when the incident unfolded, and was recused from her brother’s hearing. He remains on the force.Photo by Lola M. ChavezDr. Joseph MarshallAppointed by Mayor Gavin Newsom in 2004The longest-standing member of the Commission, Dr. Joseph Marshall has previously served as its president. This is the 69-year-old activist’s third search for a new police chief.  “The searches have to be very thorough and take a lot of time,” said Marshall. “I know to do it right.”Marshall said that the Commission did an “extensive service” by reaching out to the community as well as officers in an attempt to compile a list of qualities that both contingents would like to see in the next police chief.  “We had people tell us their thoughts and set up a search firm at the Commission and collected all that info in a document that was public,” he said.As an activist serving low-income youth from marginalized communities, Marshall said that a mind for reform and for accountability were priorities that he looked for while vetting candidates.Marshall is the co-founder and director of the Omega Boys Club/Youth Soldiers, a youth violence prevention organization, and the founder of the Alive and Free movement.“Historically, there’s been a gap between law enforcement and communities of color. [This gap] is exacerbated when you have incidents like we recently had in SF where the trust is fractured and broken,” said Marshall, referring to the recent shootings in the Bayview and the Mission.The St. Louis, Missouri, native began his 25-year teaching career at San Francisco’s Woodrow Wilson High School in 1969, but turned to anti-violence advocacy in 1994. Today, he is well-known for his work as an author, lecturer, and radio show host.  Marshall is also the father of three children.“Many of my former students ended up on drugs, selling drugs or dead — I went to so many funerals of former students I couldn’t take it any more,” he said, adding that he started the Boys Club as way of keeping connected to “my own students and keeping them alive and free.”Marshall said that when he first got to the Commission, he faced a backlog of about 80 officer disciplinary cases. Though that number has been reduced, Marshall said, the system is not perfect. “People don’t have any idea about how much discipline work commissioners do. The chief can’t fire anybody — if there is someone they believe should be terminated, it’s up to the commission.”Photo by Lola M. ChavezSonia Melara, CommissionerAppointed by Mayor Lee in 2014With over 30 years of experience in in social work, Commissioner Sonia Melara is the executive director of Rally Family Visitation Services of Saint Francis and is a part-time lecturer at San Francisco State University.Melara called her time on the commission “intense,” but attributed it to the circumstances. “We are trying to move as fast as we can — at the same time we have to ensure that the process is equitable and also very transparent in many ways,” she said, in reference to the search for police chief. From El Salvador, Melara grew up in the Mission for a majority of her childhood. Now a resident of West Portal, she is married with no children. She said her years of work on domestic violence recovery – she is the co-founder of La Casa de las Madres, California’s first shelter for survivors of domestic violence –  and her time on the Immigrants Rights Commission and the Health Commission have allowed her to bring a different perspective to the Police Commission.“The mayor is trying to put as much diversity on the commission as possible,” she said. “I have a completely different thinking than an attorney.” In the vetting of candidates who wish to head the police department, Melara said she is putting a lot of weight on experience, and whether they are receptive to reform. “As we interview potential candidates we want to see what their knowledge and experience is and whether they have been involved in similar changes in their departments,” she said. Considering the needs of the city’s different communities, she said, is an important aspect of the decision-making process.“My long-term involvement in women’s and Latino issues gives me a view as to the type of person that we need to bring in to head the department,” she said. “I’m very sensitive to the needs of all communities, not just one.”Photo by Lola M. ChavezVictor Hwang, CommissionerAppointed by the Board of Supervisors in 2014Commissioner Victor Hwang has built a career on some two decades of experience with criminal law. The criminal justice and civil rights attorney is currently vying for an open judgeship in the San Francisco Superior Court.The campaign is consuming much of Hwang’s time, about 60 to 70 hours a week, he said. Hwang is also the father of three and fiance of Ivy Lee, chief of staff to Supervisor Jane Kim.“That makes our lives all the more crazy,” said Hwang. He also runs his own law practice, which he is starting “to phase out.”“This morning I was at Glen Park BART station from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. talking to voters.  I will be out at 24 Street BART Station later to campaign; then I have to take my kids to the dentist,” said Hwang when asked to describe his day.A U.C. Berkeley graduate, Hwang attended the University of Southern California for law school and afterwards worked as a public defender in Los Angeles for five years. Hwang spent time on the San Francisco-based Asian Law Caucus, and has worked extensively in the Asian American community as a civil rights attorney. Effectively unseating former Commissioner Angela Chan, Hwang, a former prosecutor and public defender, came with the political backing of Chinatown leader Rose Pak, according to the San Francisco Chronicle. Hwang acknowledged that the Police Commission is not “set to perform the functions that we are set up to do because of overload.” Each commissioner, he said, puts in about 20 hours per week.  “There is no analyst, no director — we don’t have that kind of staffing,” he said. “All of us have other jobs.”Still, he said, the commission has effectively dealt with revising the police use-of-force policy, implemented body-worn cameras, and managed to review every candidate in its search for police chief.  “We have a very strong pool of applicants that we are looking at,” he said.Photo by Lola M. ChavezThomas P. Mazzucco, CommissionerAppointed by Mayor Gavin Newsom in 2007Thomas “Tippy” Mazzucco is the son of a San Francisco police inspector and is a former federal prosecutor experienced in white-collar defense, internal fraud, and grand jury matters, as well as commercial and corporate litigation. He currently works as an attorney for Murphy, Pearson, Bradley & Feeney, a law firm that specializes in professional liability practice. Mazzucco previously served as assistant U.S. attorney with the U.S. Department of Justice and is a former San Francisco deputy district attorney. The San Francisco native was renominated for his third term on the Commission by Mayor Ed Lee this year.While president of the Commission, Mazzucco in 2012 awarded six police officers involved in gunfights with the Gold Medal of Valor – the highest honor in the police department.  The Public Press reported that Mazzucco had then called the recipients “heroes.”One of the officers honored was Richard Hastings, who had been involved in the controversial 2011 shooting of 19-year-old Kenneth Harding. Hastings was recognized for detaining Harding for evading a Muni fare in the Bayview, an interaction that was fatal for Harding. Police later said Harding was wanted for questioning in connection to a murder in Washington. 0% Tags: City Hall • government • police • SFPD Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0% From approving policy on body cameras to firing police officers found guilty of misconduct, Wednesday nights are reserved for scrutiny of police practices at the San Francisco Police Commission.The seven-member civilian panel acts as the police department’s disciplinary body and officially meets once a week for a public hearing, usually at City Hall, to receive updates from department heads, set policy, and decide on disciplinary actions against officers. The Commission is also tasked with with overseeing the Office of Citizen Complaints, a separate city department that investigates officer misconduct reported by civiliansWith tenures ranging from 2 to 12 years, four of  the Commission’s members are appointed by the mayor and three more are selected by the Board of Supervisors.  Serving on the Commission is a volunteer position, and members receive a monthly stipend of only $100 and the option of health benefits.  In 2013, Hastings was accused of molesting a teenage boy and plead not guilty to 10 counts of child molestation and pornography possession. Hastings reportedly faced the Police Commission and resigned from the force. Mazzucco did not respond to requests for comment at press time. last_img read more

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Developments in Development Streamlining and gossip

first_imgDevelopments in Development is a “weekly” column recapping real estate, housing, planning, zoning and construction news.Good news everyone! San Francisco is only the eighth least affordable city on the planet right now, according to a RentCafe study that compared incomes to rents in attractive cities around the world. The study found that the average San Francisco family spends about 41 percent of its income on rent. But if you’ve been feeling a bit of grass-is-greener-itis, consider that tenants in Mexico City spend about 60 percent on average on their rent, with Manhattanites close behind, spending an average of 59 percent of their incomes on rent.And yet, rental listing sites are pegging local rents above New York rents, regardless of whether they’re looking at just what’s on their own site or what they think the real average rent among all current renters for a one-bedroom might be, Curbed reports. 0% Tags: development • Developments in Development • housing Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0% As you might know if you’re a housing wonk (do any non-wonks read this column?), we’re at an interesting point in the statewide work toward housing affordability. Former District 8 Supervisor and now State Senator Scott Wiener’s proposal to streamline housing production in cities that aren’t meeting statewide goals has passed the Senate and now needs the Assembly’s approval.The streamlining only applies in situations where enough housing isn’t built and it distinguishes between below-market-rate and market-rate housing — so if a city is meeting its market rate production goals but not its below-market-rate ones, it would only have procedural delays removed for affordable housing at the moment. The law would reduce neighbors’ ability to stall projects through mechanisms like Discretionary Review requests — which two projects in the Mission just went through after several months’ delay.Luis Granados of MEDA and Erick Arguello of Calle 24, two groups that have repeatedly butted heads with the YIMBYs over gentrification and development in the Mission, co-wrote a piece in the Examiner opposing SB 35. They raise concerns that a statewide streamlining would take away opportunities to demand concessions from future developments as they did with repeated appeals and opposition to projects like 2000 Bryant Street, 1515 South Van Ness Avenue and 2675 Folsom Street, because projects that meet basic planning requirements would be approved as a matter of course.For a quick break from the affordability conversation, here’s some local planning-related gossip: Planning staff told the developer to clear up confusion about whether the existing building, which houses the nonprofit Mission Girls, also includes a dwelling unit. If it does, the staff advised the developer to figure out how to get approval for demolishing a housing unit. The letter also asks for some tweaks to the design, including adding a retail entrance from Balmy Alley, adjusting the look and height of the ground floor commercial space, and adding more rear yard space. I suspect this is related to the proposals for Fort Point Brewing Company to move in – At TimBuk2’s invitation, by the way – and create a brewpub in part of the space currently used for bag retail. You can read more about that plan here. But to be fair, planning records do indicate there were permits for that site to operate as an auto repair shop in the past.center_img Another one of the buildings damaged by the 29th Street fire last year is being repaired. Owners of 29-31 29th Street, next door to the severely damaged Graywood Hotel, have applied for a building permit to turn a three-story building with one residential unit into a four-story building with two residential units while also repairing fire damage.The environmental impacts of turning a former automotive sales office and smog check facility at 1500 15th Street into 138 units of group housing (184 if a state density bonus is applied). The units would be microscopic, clocking in at 198 square feet each per the environmental application, with a shared kitchen and lounge space on each floor.Building permits have now been applied for at 2610 Mission Street, formerly home to Anna’s Linens, to add four floors of housing on top of the first floor of commercial space to create 8 units of housing. A pet food store at 433 Precita at Harrison could turn into a restaurant called Doma if a building permit is approved. The conditional use permit is still pending so nothing has been decided.And finally, the Planning Department has completed its preliminary assessment of 3001-3021 24th Street, an entirely below-market-rate project at Harrison Street pitched by Mercy Housing. The 45-unit building would provide affordable housing for seniors. The Light House, the giant building inside a former church on Dolores Street across from the park, is facing its second code violation complaint in as many years. You might remember that someone lodged a complaint against one of the condo owners there last year for hosting meditation sessions. Now someone seems to believe that there is an office space operating there.The complainant claims that Hive, a leadership networking organization, is using the space, and lo and behold, if you search on Facebook Hive gives its location at the Light House. However, planners have not yet made a decision about the merits of the complaint – it’s still processing. At 20th and Shotwell streets, someone has filed a complaint about the TimBuk2 bag manufactory and shop, saying “the space was auto repair last and is not a trade shop – loss of PDR.”last_img read more

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City funding of youth gardening program nixed due to fiscal irregularities

first_imgThe San Francisco Sheriff’s Department and Public Utilities Commission abruptly terminated a $2 million grant to the Garden Project, a nonprofit that runs a program in which at-risk youth earn $15 an hour to work on city horticulture projects.Per the Sheriff’s Department, this is a result of “irregularities” in facilitating the $1.6 million from the PUC and $400,000 from the Sheriff’s Department.  Sheriff’s Department spokeswoman Nancy Crowley says both her department and the PUC are cutting ties with the Garden Project, and have instead been working with a different nonprofit called the Young Community Developers to run the summer youth program from July 16 to August 10. This came as a jolt to longtime Garden Project executive director Catherine Sneed. “They found contractual irregularities, and they are expecting me to tell my staff — who have to pay their rent in 30 days — to go,” she said. Mark Nicco, the Sheriff’s chief legal counsel, said that details about these irregularities are still under investigation and cannot be released to the public. Sneed said she doesn’t know what kinds of inconsistencies were discovered, either.The Garden Project, per Sneed, has 29 paid staff members. She is employed full-time by the Sheriff’s Department, but puts in 40 hours a week on the Garden Project, according to the nonprofit’s tax filings. She earned $153,067 in 2017, according to the city payroll.   Crowley said Sneed might have to be reassigned.  Last summer, the program employed 296 students; in the last five years, it worked with at least 1,000 young people.The project received funding in 2014, 2015 and 2016 of about $2 million a year. During that time, the money paid to the Garden Fellows, as the youth are called, dropped by 38 percent to $443,217, according to the organization’s Form 990 tax filings with the IRS. Sneed herself founded the Garden Project in 1992, when she was a special assistant to the sheriff. In 2004, she was asked by then-Mayor Gavin Newsom to train at-risk youth to landscape the Hetch Hetchy Reservoir and Crystal Springs Watershed through a contract with the Public Utilities Commission.In addition to the year-round Garden Project, Sneed in 2010 started a summer program to provide horticultural training for at-risk San Francisco children and young people from lower-income families. This program is ongoing. This year, it received 483 applications, including 37 teenagers from the Mission District and 18 students from Mission High School.The participants in the summer program will be working with new staff. Crowley says there will probably be some restructuring, but the goal remains the same: to train and teach young people the science and art of growing plants. Sneed declined to make further comments about the future of her organization. Subscribe to Mission Local’s daily newslettercenter_img Email Address,0%last_img read more

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ROYCE Simmons pulled no punches as Saints lost 34

first_imgROYCE Simmons pulled no punches as Saints lost 34-32 to Catalans at Langtree Park.Whilst praising the quality of the Dragons’ play to overturn a 26-8 deficit he questioned the officiating and bemoaned his side’s defending.“Things started to go wrong for us when we had four penalties against us in a row and that meant we didn’t have possession for long periods,” he said. “They had a lot of ball in our end of the field and we didn’t have that.“They played really well and chanced their hand, backed themselves and scored some tremendous tries from a very talented side who are well coached.“But at the end of the day they choked us to death in the first half and got round our necks. Any side who plays against us tries to stop James Roby from running – and they are good tactics – but you can’t turn those rules around in the second half to suit the opposition.“We got a couple of penalties in the first half, five I think and it should have been around 35. In the second half we got penalised and some of the things especially one of the incidents, I couldn’t understand why. I thought it was a very ordinary performance from the referee, but take nothing away from Catalans.”He continued: “In saying that we let in soft tries which were disappointing. We let points in this week and last week and we have to look at that as a team. We are trying to do things one out and not as a unit. We are trying our hearts out but are trying to solve them on our own. We come out of the line as individuals too many times and didn’t work as a complete unit. We need to be doing the same thing in defence.“For the first 40 we were fantastic, played well and defended pretty good. When we didn’t get the penalties in the second half, we didn’t handle that situation very well. But as I said, I will be ringing Stuart Cummings this week as some of those penalties were an absolute joke compared to the way we got hammered in the first half.”last_img read more

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SAINTS have announced their 19man squad for Satur

first_imgSAINTS have announced their 19-man squad for Saturday’s First Utility Super League clash with London Broncos.Anthony Laffranchi and Matty Dawson return the line-up.Nathan Brown will choose from:2. Tommy Makinson 3. Jordan Turner, 4. Josh Jones, 6. Lance Hohaia, 8. Mose Masoe (pictured), 9. James Roby, 10. Louie McCarthy-Scarsbrook, 11. Sia Soliola, 12. Jon Wilkin, 13. Willie Manu, 14. Anthony Laffranchi, 15. Mark Flanagan, 16. Kyle Amor, 17. Paul Wellens, 18. Alex Walmsley, 22. Mark Percival, 24. Gary Wheeler, 26. Matty Dawson, 28. Luke Thompson.Joe Grima will choose his London Broncos side from:3. Jordan Atkins, 4. Thomas Minns, 6. Ben Farrar, 7. Josh Drinkwater, 9. Scott Moore, 10. Olsi Krasniqi, 11. Michael McMeeken, 12. Matt Cook, 13. Alex Foster, 16. Nick Slyney, 17. Will Lovell, 18. George Griffin, 19. Erjon Dollapi, 21. Joel Wicks, 22. James Woodburn-Hall, 23. Denny Solomona, 30. Jon Wallace. 33. Joe Keyes, **. Oscar Thomas.The game kicks off at 3pm and the referee will be Tim Roby.Tickets for the fixture have sold out at Langtree Park, but are available from The Hive on matchday.last_img read more

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Man arrested for attempted bank robbery in Bladen County

first_imgCLARKTON, NC (WWAY) — A man attempted a bank robbery at a Clarkton BB&T bank Friday afternoon.The Bladen County Sheriff’s office says Neil Alexander Torrez wore face paint as he entered the bank at around 4:23 p.m. He handed the teller a note demanding cash but no weapon was displayed.- Advertisement – Another bank teller called 9-1-1 and reported the attempted theft. A deputy arrived on the scene within two minutes of the call. However, the suspect fled on foot before their arrival.The Bladen County Sherriff’s office and the North Carolina State Highway Patrol searched the area for Torrez. A state trooper apprehended him as he was laying in a wooded area, not too far from the bank.Torrez is being booked in Bladen County Jail.last_img

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I140 Wilmington Bypass ribbon cutting tentatively set for Friday

first_img The DOT says it will depend on a number of factors as to whether the road will open after the ribbon cutting, or whether work will need to continue for a couple more days.Last week’s wet weather set work back and impacted sign installation, installation of pavement markings throughout the project, and the final concrete pour, all of which resumed today, according to NC DOT Spokesman Brian Rick.The almost eight mile stretch of road will connect the section of bypass already open in New Hanover and Brunswick Counties.Related Article: Highway Patrol identifies driver killed in fiery FedEx crashOnce the road opens, lane closures will be necessary until early Spring to complete the cleaning and painting of the structures.Rick says Friday will start the final chapter of the approximate 20 mile, $411 million project that began in 2000. BRUNSWICK COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — The final leg of of the Wilmington Bypass project is almost ready for drivers.On Friday, the NC Department of Transportation hopes to hold a ribbon cutting ceremony to celebrate the final phase of the project, unless weather forces a delay.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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Wrightsville Beach crosswalk crackdown gets mixed reaction

first_img While others understand why police did it.“I watched the police out here a couple weeks ago. They had a police officer in uniform push the button. And people would wiz right on through it even once the light had turned red,” a resident, Colin Eagles, said.Wrightsville Beach Police Chief Dan House said residents asked them to crack down on drivers who don’t adhere to the pedestrian crosswalks. Chief House said they pulled over almost a dozen people in one day, after residents asked them to enforce the crosswalks.Related Article: Wrightsville Beach 12 brace for Florence to fully make landfallThose who live on the island think it’s okay to enforce the law like this, as long as it promotes safety.“I cross the street here two or three times a day. I walk the loop everyday. I try to walk my dog a couple times a day over here. I cannot tell you the number of times I’ve had cars just shoot through the red light. The more the police want to work this, the happier I’m going to be about it,” Eagles said.Chief House said this was a one time thing, unless they get more complaints.For those unfamiliar with how the light works: press the button and that will activate the system. The traffic lights will turn red, signaling for drivers to stop. Then pedestrians can cross. Once the traffic light starts blinking, drivers may proceed if the road is clear. WRIGHTSVILLE BEACH, NC (WWAY) — The red light at a crosswalk means stop. To drive that message home, a Wrightsville Beach police officer recently triggered the light at the intersection of Causeway and North Channel drives. Officers watched and pulled drivers who didn’t stop at the High Intensity Activated Crosswalk, or HAWK. It was a tactic some question.“If the officer was standing, pressing the button without anybody trying to cross, then that certainly seems like entrapment cause there’d be no other reason to cross it,” a resident, Melanie Ellers, said.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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Whiteville man charged with indecent liberties with a child

first_imgCOLUMBUS COUNTY, NC (WWAY)– A Columbus County man is in jail under a $250,000 bond on child sex crime charges.The Columbus County Sheriff’s Office arrested Lorenzo Reyes Salas, 63, on 5 counts of indecent liberties with a child.- Advertisement – Columbus County Sheriff’s Office Spokeswoman Michele Tatum says the incidents occurred from October 15 to November 29.The warrant states that he unlawfully, willfully, and feloniously did take and attempt to take immoral, improper, and indecent liberties with the child who was under the age of 16 at the time, for the purpose of arousing and gratifying sexual desire.The alleged crimes happened at his Whiteville home.Related Article: WPD: Snoring leads to stabbing at Wilmington hotellast_img

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Pender High athletic director stepping down assistant takes over

first_img Stokes said Matt Davis will take over as athletic director. David is currently Pender’s head volleyball coach, head girls soccer coach and assistant AD.Stokes is the second athletic director to leave a Pender County high school in the last week.Last week Barry West announced his resignation from Topsail High School amid an investigation into the handling of an ineligible player that cost the Pirates baseball team a trip to the state playoffs. PENDER COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — Pender High School’s athletic director is stepping down and will be replaced by her assistant AD.In an e-mail to WWAY Bevin Stokes said she is stepping down effective June 30. She did not give a reason for her departure.- Advertisement – last_img

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