US Open: Osaka dominates teenage star, Gauff

first_imgRelatedPosts Live stream Premier League, La Liga, Serie A on Showmax Pro this weekend Thiem claims his first Grand Slam title after thrilling fightback in US Open Naomi Osaka wins US Open women’s title Defending champion Naomi Osaka dominated rising star Coco Gauff 6-3 6-0 to reach the last 16 of the US Open. Gauff, the 15-year-old who became a household name for her exploits at Wimbledon earlier this year, was making her first appearance on court in the Arthur Ashe Stadium. But 21-year-old Osaka, back at the scene of her dramatic triumph against Serena Williams 12 months ago, handled the occasion far better. A Gauff double fault in her first service game gave her opponent a break and set the tone for a display peppered with too many unforced errors. A pair of aces eventually saw the younger player hold, and she then broke back before further breaks of serve were exchanged, Osaka finally holding to take the set. At the start of the second, audible groans went around Ashe when Gauff’s double fault brought up 0-30, and a second handed another break to Osaka. Three break points in the next game briefly raised hopes of a revival, but they were quickly snuffed out by Osaka’s booming groundstrokes. It was all over when a Gauff forehand went long, and Osaka rushed to console the tearful teenager as she tumbled out of her debut US Open in the third round. Gauff was persuaded by her opponent to stay for the courtside interview, and said: “She told me I did amazing. “She said would I do the interview, I said ‘no I’m going to cry’, but she encouraged me to do it. “It was amazing, I’m going to learn a lot from this match. She’s been so sweet to me.” Osaka took it upon herself to speak to Gauff in the locker room earlier in the week. But she said: “I don’t think I’m a mentor.”Tags: Arthur Ashe StadiumCoco GauffNaomi OsakaUS Openlast_img read more

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Wenger: Wilshere answered critics

first_img Former England and Manchester United star Paul Scholes has been the most outspoken in questioning why Wilshere’s development has stalled since making his debut in 2008. The 22-year-old issued the perfect response against the Barclays Premier League champions, reacting to Sergio Aguero’s opener by lobbing Joe Hart before teeing up a sublime volley for Alexis Sanchez. But Scholes was greeted by an irrepressible display that argued a watertight case for being involved in the advanced role favoured by Wilshere and Wenger. England coach Roy Hodgson has used him more defensively, but Wenger believes his strengths demand a different approach. “Jack was always a boy who was at his most dangerous in the final third. That’s why I prefer him to play higher up the pitch,” Wenger said. “One of his qualities is penetrating in the final third, but I’m not against him being defensive. He can do both because he is a good footballer. “For a long time he didn’t kick the ball well because of his ankle injury. “The big difference now is that he stays on the feet, whereas before for a while when he was not as confident to push on his ankle he would go down. “Now he has that solid aspect to the game he had before he was injured.” Wilshere took the diplomatic line by stating he is happy in either midfield role, but his words also made his preference clear. “Naturally I want to go forward more. In Arsenal’s formation it’s nice to play forward and in the England one it’s different. I’m happy to play either way,” Wilshere said. It was Wilshere’s first goal since January and the Arsenal academy product admits he needs to be more prolific. “I want to score more goals and my goalscoring record hasn’t been good enough,” Wilshere added. “In the formation we play I should be scoring more goals. We play with one holding and two going forward and I’m the one who gets forward. “I’ve had a few chances already this season and I should be scoring more. Hopefully that will be one of many.” Wilshere highlighted the new found spirit that ensured Arsenal would not fold after slipping a goal behind and City captain Vincent Kompany was impressed by what he saw. “They have definitely made progress. They are a better side. They have more quality all over the pitch,” Kompany said. “Obviously they played well but they didn’t have too many clear-cut chances. “They didn’t need too many to score twice, which is the sign of a strong team.” Martin Demichelis’ late header salvaged a 2-2 draw for City, but it was the dynamic Wilshere who really caught the eye. “The best place to answer critics is on the pitch,” said Wenger, who was forced to defend the unimpressive Mesut Ozil once again. “That’s what Jack did, but I don’t believe we can explain his good performance through the criticism of Paul Scholes. “But you have to respond to critics when you’re in a public job. You have accept criticism, go on the pitch and show you have the talent. “The most important thing is to go show how good you are. “Jack finished with his right foot and chipped a goalkeeper who knows him well. I’m very happy with that way he finished. “He looked dangerous in the first half as well because he has found his pace again. I’m very happy.” Debate has raged over Wilshere’s best position with Scholes highlighting the uncertainty before Saturday’s Emirates Stadium showdown in his role as analyser for BT Sport. Arsene Wenger insists Jack Wilshere silenced his critics by inspiring Arsenal’s fightback against Manchester City. Press Associationlast_img read more

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Sake comes good at Wexford

first_img Press Association In the absence of Georgia On My Mind, Faseeha was sent off the 9-10 favourite and took up the running more than three furlongs out. For Goodness Sake headed her before the furlong pole, though, and had enough in the tank to see off the rallying market leader by a length and a quarter, with her stable companion Pure Drama third. For Goodness Sake led home a one-three for John Murphy in the Irish Stallion Farms EBF Fillies Maiden at Wexford.center_img Murphy said: “I’ve always liked her and she’s improved with each run. It was probably a weak race and she should stay further.” Winning jockey Shane Foley followed up when High Kicker came off the reserves’ bench to justify 5/4 favouritism in the Ballaghkeen Handicap. Henry’s Girl has taken well to the Flat game and ran out a determined winner of the Forth & Bargy Maiden. The 7-2 chance got her head in front a furlong from the finish and kept it there, despite the late lunge of Kennady. Emmet McNamara steered Askmour to a breakthrough triumph in the Monart Destination Hotel & Spa Ladies Day Handicap. Deputising for the injured Niall McCullagh, McNamara sent the 8-1 shot into the lead at the top of the straight and she stayed on well to beat well-backed favourite Deor by a length and three-quarters. McNamara said: “I’m delighted but I’m also a bit gutted for Niall McCullagh. She’s his ride, he has done all the work with her and as everyone knows he got an awful fall yesterday so I want to wish him the best of luck and to get well as soon as he can. “She toughed it out well, she got there and she just kept finding and finding for me. “She’s a filly that could progress again going up in trip. She ran a bit in snatches but she hit the line well.” last_img read more

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Tennis News US Open 2019: Rafael Nadal Warns Fans, ‘Big Three’ Era Quickly Coming To An End

first_imgNew York: Rafael Nadal warns men’s tennis fans that the “Big Three” era is coming to an end very soon, and he’s not all that worried about it. The 33-year-old Spaniard, an 18-time major champion, will try to add to his trophy haul Sunday when he faces Russia’s fifth-ranked Daniil Medvedev in the US Open final.Together with 20-time Grand Slam winner Roger Federer and 16-time Slam champion Novak Djokovic of Serbia, Nadal has been part of a historic trio whose members own 54 of the past 65 Grand Slam men’s singles titles — including the past 11 in a row. Toss in Britain’s Andy Murray, a three-time Grand Slam winner who is making a singles comeback after hip surgery, and you have a fourth star of the times.But, Nadal warns, it’s getting time to close that chapter.”We don’t need to hold this era anymore,” Nadal said.  “We have been here for 15 years almost. Hopefully, but for my personal interest. At some point, these days, going to happen sooner than later that this era going to end.””Is arriving to the end. I am 33. Novak is 32. Roger is 38. Andy is 32, too. The clock is not stopping. That’s part of the cycle of life.””I’m not much worried about this because in tennis always going to be great champions.”There are rising stars. Fourth-ranked Austrian Dominic Thiem (25) lost the past two French Open finals. Number five Medvedev (23) is in his first Slam final. Germany’s sixth-ranked Alexander Zverev (22) and Greece’s eight-ranked Stefanos Tsitsipas (21) are charging toward the top as well.But the “Big Three” have dominated like no other generation in tennis, whether the 1960s era of Roy Emerson setting the record of 12 career Slam titles, or the American-dominated 1990s run of Andre Agassi and Pete Sampras, whose 14 Slam wins became the new standard.Nadal owns 12 French Open titles. Federer has eight Wimbledon crowns and six from the Australian Open. Djokovic has captured seven titles in Australia and five more at Wimbledon.Since Federer won his first Slam title to launch the Big Three era at Wimbledon in 2003, only five men’s major finals have been played without either the Swiss star, Djokovic or Nadal being involved.Djokovic, winner in four of the previous five Slams, went out in the US Open fourth round to three-time Slam winner Stan Wawrinka, a left shoulder injury forcing the Serbian star to retire. And Federer, who lost an epic five-set Wimbledon final to Djokovic in July, was ousted in the quarter-finals by Grigor Dimitrov, who had lost their prior seven matches.Federer was blunt when asked what it meant for tennis not having two of the Big Three in the US Open’s last four.”Not much,” Federer said.Federer said he expects to have more chances at Grand Slam titles even at age 38.”I don’t have the crystal ball. Do you?” Federer said.”So we never know. I hope so, of course. I think still it’s been a positive season. Disappointing now, but I’ll get back up, I’ll be all right.”Djokovic Seeks RecordDjokovic, the youngest of the trio, says he is planning a comeback in Tokyo and his aim remains going to the top of the career Grand Slam win list, potentially after Nadal and Federer have retired.”I have, of course, desire and a goal to reach the most Slams and reach Roger’s record,” Djokovic said. “But at the same time, it’s a long road ahead hopefully for me.”I hope I can play for many more years. I’m planning to. I mean, I don’t see an end behind the corner at all. Now it’s a matter of keeping my body and mind in shape and trying to still peak at these kind of events.”Time is on Djokovic’s side, but Nadal sees the journey as more meaningful than the destination when it comes to the all-time Grand Slam title record.”Of course, I would love to be the one who achieve more Grand Slams, but I still sleep very well without being the one who has more Grand Slams,” Nadal said.”You cannot be all day frustrated or all day thinking about what’s your neighbor have better than you. You have to be happy with yourself. You have to do your way.””If you are the one to achieve more, fantastic. If not, at least I give my best during all my career.”  For all the Latest Sports News News, Tennis News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps.last_img read more

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MBB : Raising his game: Jackson ‘makes name’ by becoming premier big man in final season at SU

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on March 8, 2011 at 12:00 pm Commentscenter_img When his son was 11 years old, Rick Jackson Sr. took him to play Philadelphia basketball. It’s a different brand, a different style of play that hardens and toughens those who participate. Rick Jackson found that out soon enough.Rick Sr. watched as his son played against 16- and 17-year-olds in Philadelphia’s Chew Playground on 18th Street and Washington Avenue, near the family’s house.The younger Rick went up for a rebound. Soon, he met two elbows. One in the chest. One in the face. Knocked back, lip bleeding and flustered, the gangly preteen version of today’s Jackson sheepishly looked at his father.‘That’s the way you’re going to have to play,’ Rick Sr. told his son. ‘It’s hard. But you have to play that way.’The next play, Rick Jackson’s look turned to one of determination. He gave a shot right back at a player inside. Countless elbows, scratches and swings followed through the years. Jackson never looked at his father after another one of them. And he never looked back.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAs No. 11 Syracuse prepares for the postseason — which starts Thursday at 2 p.m. in Madison Square Garden with the quarterfinals of the Big East tournament — Jackson is the reason this SU team goes in primed to build off two straight Sweet 16 performances.Once an afterthought among Top 10 recruiting classes and loaded teams, Jackson quickly rose to become the conference’s top inside player this season. His path there was unlikely. But through what his closest friends and family say is a penchant for hard work, determination and that toughness, Jackson got to where he stands today.‘He’s the best two-way player in the league when you look at defense and offense,’ SU head coach Jim Boeheim said last week. ‘He’s by far the most influential player.’The ‘moment’Jackson’s ‘moment’ came with a trip to the doctor’s office.His moment was nothing like Andy Rautins’, who grew up with a Syracuse pedigree imitating famous basketball players on a Toys ‘R’ Us hoop. Jackson wanted to play football.Nothing like Arinze Onuaku, who displayed super strength as a child when he lifted a nine-pound milk jug at 10 months. Jackson was long and lean.So for Jackson, the moment that would influence the rest of his basketball career happened in a cramped Philadelphia hospital patient’s room. A simple checkup turned complicated when his doctor said Jackson was growing too fast. He wanted to give him a shot to slow his growth.Worried, his mother, Joyce Thomas, considered the option.‘Listening to this doctor, I got scared,’ she said. ‘I was saying, ‘OK. It’s not good? Slow it down then.”But when Rick Sr. heard of the possibility, his son said he ‘freaked out.’ At the same time, Dad put things in perspective. Rick Sr. stood at 6 feet 5 inches. His father was 6 feet 7 inches. No need to rush to a decision that could affect the rest of his son’s life.‘Here I am,’ Rick Jackson said. ‘Six-nine. It all worked out. I’m just glad that didn’t happen.’Rick Sr. put a basketball in his son’s hands at the age of 7. Four years later, he started playing in playground leagues. That’s about the time he met Scoop Jardine, who would become his point guard to this day.Together, they strayed from the path that took many of their friends to life in the streets, jail or worse. Together, they stuck to basketball. Together, they made a promise soon after they met.‘He kept saying it,’ Thomas said of her son. ‘‘Me and Scoop, me and Scoop. We’re going to the same college. Me and Scoop, me and Scoop.”The SummitThe 6 a.m. wake-up call came every day during the summer between Jackson and Jardine’s freshman and sophomore seasons at Neumann-Goretti High School.Sometimes, Aaron Abbott slept on Deborah Jardine’s floor to make sure her grandson Scoop and Jackson got up. Sometimes, Abbott, a Neumann-Goretti assistant coach, left his own house early to gather two or three other players in addition to the two Neumann-Goretti budding stars.Either way, they crammed into his burgundy 2000 Ford Taurus every morning by 6:30 and drove to The Summit, a training center.‘You didn’t want to do it,’ Jackson said. ‘It was almost a job. I hated it. But it made me better.’That summer, Jackson became the beast that eventually got noticed by the likes of Connecticut, Wake Forest and, of course, Syracuse.The routine was always the same. Get to The Summit by 7 a.m. Train for three hours. Lift for two more before grabbing lunch. Then back after lunch to repeat.‘It would be maybe four or five guys in my little car,’ Abbott said. ‘Rick was the biggest, of course. But they’d always fall asleep.‘We spent a lot of time sleeping and eating in that car.’Abbott called him ‘Rookie.’ Still does. That freshman season as an assistant at Neumann-Goretti, Abbott made ‘Rookie’ carry around the seniors’ travel bags. At the end of practices, he dumped and scattered basketballs all throughout the gym and made ‘Rookie’ pick every single one up. He never complained.He built confidence then. He built confidence over the summer. And after those 10-hour work days, Jardine and Abbott said Jackson, who played sparingly in his freshman season at Neumann-Goretti, knew he was going to start.Soon after, as a sophomore, he won the job over a returning starter and senior.‘After our freshman year, he made up his mind that he was going to start,’ Jardine said. ‘I remember the hunger that he had that sophomore year. … I’m not going to lie. He really blew up, and he became a totally different player.’In his junior season, he and Jardine went head to head with Kevin Durant’s Montrose Christian team. Abbott remembers pulling Jackson aside midgame with a simple message.‘You’re playing like a punk,’ Abbott told him.The next play, Jackson — who is bigger and stronger than Durant — finally went up strong to the hoop in Durant’s face. Later, he put in a hook shot that put Neumann-Goretti up for good.‘He played like a monster,’ Abbott said. ‘He really took over the game. From that moment on, I knew he really wanted it.’‘The one guy you can’t take off the court’Mike Hopkins offers apologies to Syracuse guards Jardine and Brandon Triche and to forward Kris Joseph. That’s because to Hopkins, SU’s assistant coach, Jackson is the one player this Syracuse team can’t afford to lose.‘He’s the one guy you can’t take off the court. Ever,’ Hopkins said. ‘You have a lot of guys — if Scoop got hurt, or Brandon — they’re unbelievable players. … But he just means so much to what we do.’This season, Jackson has once again become the leading man at his program. In 31 games, Jackson averaged 13.1 points and 10.7 rebounds per game. He became a double-double machine.By the end of his freshman season at Syracuse, Jackson played single-digit minutes as the Orange limped to the NIT for the second consecutive season.‘By his sophomore year, he was ready to be rotting on that bench like a lot of players do,’ Thomas said. ‘He kept nagging Boeheim. He kept telling him, ‘Give me a chance. You keep yanking me out. You don’t even give me 15 minutes. Give me a chance to show you what I can do.”He finally got his chance his sophomore year against Memphis — albeit as a result of Eric Devendorf’s suspension. But for Hopkins, the game signified Jackson’s arrival.But Jackson had trouble staying in games. He played more than 30 minutes in just five of SU’s 31 regular-season games in his junior season. He struggled mightily in extended minutes in both Syracuse’s Big East tournament loss to Georgetown and its NCAA Tournament shocker to Butler, as SU played without its senior center Onuaku.Boeheim routinely pulls players aside in the locker room after games to point out individual successes or flaws. This one, though, Jackson didn’t quite expect. A few feet away from a sullen Onuaku, Boeheim sent his future star big man a message.‘We’re going to need you next year,’ Boeheim told him. ‘AO’s going to be gone. I need you to be the physical player that you can be — a guy that can go and rebound and bang for 40 minutes. I need you to be in shape to be able to play 40 minutes and just be an animal around the basket.’Within a couple of weeks, Jackson dumped cakes and cookies from his diet. He went back to the routine Abbott taught him. He shot hundreds of 15-foot jumpers, adding a new element to his game.It showed in perhaps the most important moment of the regular season at Connecticut, one of 13 games in which he’s played 38 minutes or more this season. The Orange was a loser of four straight.Minutes earlier, Jackson was embarrassed on a block by UConn’s Alex Oriakhi. With time winding down in the half, he took it right back to the teeth of the Husky defense. He pulled up for a hook shot, giving SU a 26-25 lead. It gave Syracuse its first lead in 133 minutes and 44 seconds of game time.‘The one thing about Ricky that’s huge is his consistency,’ Hopkins said. ‘He’s been consistent day in and day out. All. Year.’Making his nameWhen Thomas finished her daily 10-hour days as a SEPTA bus driver, she would come home and play basketball with young Rick. One on one, Mom usually won.‘You can’t beat your mom?’ Thomas teased her son. ‘You’re garbage!’For years, Jackson waited for revenge. Needless to say, Thomas can’t compete anymore. Last time they played, in a schoolyard across from their home, she laughed as Jackson dunked on her.‘That’s just the way he plays,’ Thomas said. ‘He’s going to want to play better no matter who he’s playing.’Last Saturday, Thomas and Rick Sr. watched that mentality in action from the stands as their son dominated on a Senior Day reserved solely for him. They stood by him as he received a plaque with a jersey that bore his number. They watched as he came out of a game for the final time at the Carrier Dome. They listened as the crowd chanted, ‘Thank you, Jackson!’For Jackson and Syracuse, his brand keeps the story going.‘I’m trying to make a name for myself,’ Jackson said. ‘A lot of guys come to college, and they’re just players. They don’t make a name for themselves. I don’t want that. I want to take over.’bplogiur@syr.edulast_img read more

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Pedro (Pete) Lara, 86, Wellington: June 29, 1929 – Dec. 9, 2015

first_imgPedro LaraPedro (Pete) Lara, age 86, of Wellington, died Wednesday, December 9, 2015 at Via Christi St. Francis/Harry Hynes Hospice Unit in Wichita, KS.  He had worked as a machinist for Boeing for 35 years before he retired.Pedro Lara was born on June 29, 1929 in Mulvane, KS to Ramon Andres Lara and Juanita (Maldenado) Lara.  He served in the United States Army from 1951-1953.He married Priscilla M. Gonzales at St. Rose Catholic Church in Wellington on September 23, 1961.He enjoyed spending time with his family and friends.He was preceded in death by his parents; two brothers, Raymond and Victor and one sister, Theresa.Survivors include his loving wife of 54 years, Priscilla Lara of Wellington, KS; one son, Richard Lara and his wife Tracy of Wichita, KS; three sisters, Rachel Lara and Leonor Lara both of El Dorado, KS and Mary Henderson of Wichita, KS; three grandchildren, Richard A. “R.J.”, Jr., Pedro Andres and Kennedee Rene Lara all of Wichita, KS; and numerous nieces and nephews.A Rosary will be held on Monday, December 14, 2015 at 7:00 P.M. at St. Anthony – St. Rose Catholic Church.Mass of Christian Burial will be held at St. Anthony – St. Rose Catholic Church on Tuesday, December 15, 2015 at 10 a.m.  Father Hung Pham will be the Celebrant and Father Andrew J. Seiler will be the Concelebrant. Interment will follow the service at Prairie Lawn Cemetery in Wellington, KS.Visitation will be held at the funeral home on Monday, December 14, 2015 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.Memorial funds have been established with the Harry Hynes Hospice and Bishop Carroll Catholic High School Baseball Team in lieu of flowers.  Contributions can be left at the funeral home.Frank Funeral Home has been entrusted with the arrangements.To leave condolences or sign our guest book, please visit our website at www.frankfuneralhome.netlast_img read more

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State officials release data on ventilators, hospital capacity

first_imgDES MOINES — State officials say there 280 ventilators available for use in the state right now. Critically ill COVID-19 patients will experience respiratory failure and need ventilators to breathe.Iowa Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management director Joyce Flinn says the state hopes to get more ventilators.“We have some ventilators on order,” Flinn says. “I believe it’s a very small number because they’re very hard to find.”State officials are encouraging hospitals to use plans from the Centers for Disease Control and convert anesthesia machines into ventilators. Early last week, government officials indicated the number of ventilators in the state was confidential information because they’re part of emergency plans.On Wednesday, officials released those numbers, along with an estimate that there are enough doctors, nurses and other caregivers employed today to hospitalize about 9000 people in Iowa. Flinn says data on the number of face masks, gloves and other personal protective equipment currently available in Iowa is a constantly changing number.“We’re buying lots of gowns, lots of gloves, swabs, test kits,” Flinn says.Purchases are being made by the state as well as individual hospitals around the state, according to Flinn. Iowa National Guard soldiers delivered protective equipment for medical staff to more than 20 county distribution sites around the state on Wednesday.last_img read more

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Liverpool front three ride to the rescue of an unsure defence

first_imgLiverpoolLiverpool, United Kingdom | AFP | Liverpool had to do the job twice over on Champions League upstarts Salzburg to get their defence of the competition back on track, but again relied on a prolific front three to cover over the cracks of an unsettled defence.Mohamed Salah finally secured a thrilling 4-3 victory with his second of the night at Anfield after the holders had let an early 3-0 lead slip to the free-scoring Austrian champions.However, the Egyptian’s strike partners were just as impressive as Sadio Mane opened the scoring against his former club and Roberto Firmino played a huge part in three of Liverpool’s four goals.“It was far away from being a perfect game, but it was a typical Liverpool game, very exciting,” surmised the Reds’ manager Jurgen Klopp.There was plenty to concern Klopp, who insisted  the whole world now knows what he already did — that a side crowned champions of Europe in June and on a 16-match winning streak in the Premier League remains a work in progress.Salzburg have scored 51 goals this season and while few teams may match the fearless attacking prowess of Jesse Marsch’s young side, Liverpool’s defensive frailties were too easily exposed.Joe Gomez endured a torrid night deputising for the injured Joel Matip, stand-in goalkeeper Adrian nearly had another horror moment as an attempted pass out from the back was charged down, and even the normally flawless Virgil van Dijk was left floundering on the floor by Hwang Hee-Chan for Salzburg’s first goal.“Everyone wants to panic and stress and maybe look for all the negatives but we shouldn’t,” said Van Dijk.“There’s no reason for panic at all, we just need to relax, have a look at what can be better.”– Reliable strikeforce –Klopp will hope to have Brazilian number one Alisson Becker and Matip back for the rest of the group stages to restore the solidity to a defence that kept five clean sheets in six Champions League games at Anfield last season.But with their team in need, after a 2-0 defeat to Napoli on matchday one, the ever-reliable trio of Salah, Mane and Firmino stepped forward to ensure a nervy night for the hosts did not turn into a nightmare. Mane made his name in European football at Salzburg and did not celebrate his goal in front of the travelling fans, but that was the only sign of grace he showed his former employers.The opener owed just as much to Firmino’s cushioned pass into the Senegalese’s path and after Andy Robertson finished off a flowing move to make it 2-0, all of the front three combined seemingly to kill the game off.Mane’s cross was headed goalwards by Firmino and after Cican Stankovic parried his effort, Salah gratefully slotted home the rebound.“That was some of the best football we played so far (this season),” added Klopp on Liverpool’s opening blitz.Perhaps even more impressively, Liverpool steadied themselves with half an hour to go when all the momentum was in Salzburg’s favour.Salah’s speed of movement and thought to anticipate a headed knockdown from Firmino put him through on goal and he smashed past Stankovic to Anfield’s relief.“It’s a little bit tough because the human mind thinks a little bit ‘OK, we’re going to win and score again and again,’” said Salah of how Liverpool lost control.“When we were winning 3-0 we needed to score a fourth and fifth and number six also.”Liverpool have yet to lose a two-legged European tie under Klopp, reaching three finals in the past four seasons.Should they sort their defensive issues out to see off Napoli and Salzburg for a place in the last 16, the holders will back their firepower to take them all the way again to Istanbul next May.Share on: WhatsApplast_img read more

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Senior Men’s Amateur – Day Two: Attoe and Smith tied as pack prepare to pounce

first_img Ian Attoe heads into the final day of the English Senior Men’s Amateur Championship tied for the lead with Andrew Smith and still harbouring hopes of a third title on the spin.On a blisteringly hot day at Woodhall Spa Golf Club in Lincolnshire, fast-running and bouncy conditions on the Bracken Course made scoring extremely tough for the competitors.Attoe – winner in 2018 and 2019 – shot a three over par round of 75 in the morning on the Bracken Course and saw his name climb steadily up the leaderboard as the day progressed and the mercury climbed to 33 degrees centigrade.The Worplesdon Golf Club member was joined on a two-round total of level par by Royal Ashdown Forest’s Smith.Smith started the round on four-under par after shooting 69 on day one on the Hotchkin Course. On day two he carded a round of 76 and climbed up a place in the rankings.A measure of the conditions was shown by the fact only one player in the field broke par.That honour fell to Torquay Golf Club’s Peter Bicknell who made three birdies in a one under par round of 71. The only blot on the scorecard was a double bogey on the par five, 14th hole.Attoe – who also won this event in 2015 – admitted this was a day where pars were golden and it was all about minimising damage rather than pushing for birdies.“The pins were tucked away and could have been for the Men’s Amateur last week and not the seniors this week,” confirmed the 61-year-old.“It was difficult to get an approach close and you were relying on some long first putts.“I think I said there might be some good scores in the tournament, but not on that course. Scores will be made on the Hotchkin.“It’s playable, but you need the first putt close and then tap it in for par“My putting was hit and miss yesterday and was worse today. The long game’s still good and I’ll be glad to get on the Hotchkin.“I’ve still got one hand on the trophy!”Local knowledge proved useful for the Woodhall Spa duo of Paul Wharton and Les Toyne.While others grew frustrated with quirky bounces and tricky, sloping greens Toyne and Wharton knew that scores in the mid-70s were not to be sniffed at and the equivalent of breaking even on a treacherous day for scoring.Both men shot 75 to finish the day on totals of one over par – just a shot adrift of the leaders and with all to play for in the final round back on the Hotchkin Course.Joining them on +1 is England international Rupert Kellock from Sunningdale (pictured above). A round of 76 has kept the former Welsh Open winner in the hunt for his own national title.First round leader Gareth Bradley couldn’t recapture his form from day one and fell down the order with a round of 80However, the Cheshire county captain starts the final day only three shots back and with good memories of six birdies from his opening round on the Hotchkin.It was also an interesting day on the Bracken for Tim Cooper from Bolton Lostock Golf Club. His approach to the 17th got stuck up a tree and son Ed had to come to the rescue. Fortunately for Cooper senior, the double bogey seven didn’t stop him making the cut.There are nine players within four shots of the leaders with 60 golfers making it through to the last day after the 36-hole cut fell at 13-over par.Details of the second round along with Saturday’s tee times can be found on the English Senior Men’s Amateur Championship homepage.Photography: Leaderboard Tags: Andrew Smith, English Senior Men’s Amateur Stroke Play Championship, Ian Attoe 7 Aug 2020 Senior Men’s Amateur – Day Two: Attoe and Smith tied as pack prepare to pounce last_img read more

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FH Council Wants Contact Info for Business Owners

first_imgBy John BurtonFAIR HAVEN — An ordinance proposed by the Borough Council last week would require business owners in town to check in with borough officials every year.If approved by the council, the ordinance introduced at the Oct. 24 meeting would require those who hold a 50 percent or larger stake in a Fair Haven business to register with the borough and provide contact information for at least one owner of the business in case police, fire or other municipal officials need to contact them.Mayor Michael Halfacre said last week there have been numerous instances where situations have arisen with local businesses but town representatives have been unable to get in touch with business owners.“Shouldn’t you come to the town and ask, ‘Aren’t there any special rules?’” Halfacre offered as an explanation. He also said, “Our goal is to make it as simple as possible.”Once businesses file the necessary information they would be contacted annually to update the information, which would have to be done by July 1 of each year. There wouldn’t be a charge to the businesses for the annual update, but a $25 fee would be imposed if businesses fail to update their information by Sept. 30 of each year.“I think it’s a good thing,” this week said Michel Berger, president of the Fair Haven Business Association.Berger, who owns and operates Front Line Media, a computer software firm, said the association has also discovered “how difficult it was to reach out to all the businesses when there’s a need to communicate information.” He believes having contact information for business owners on file at Borough Hall would help the association as well.The association, which has approximately 65 members, has discussed the matter at past meetings and the overall consensus is to support it, especially since there is no fee attached, Berger explained.last_img read more

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